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Discussion Starter #1
I am familiar with Tri-color, red/white, and Lemon. But I have never seen or heard of a Black basset. Is this a true color for the breed? If so, what per centage of the breed are black?:)
 

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Back before I got my Gibbs I had an application filled out to adopt a dog named Maximillian from BROOD. He was all black with 1 little tan patch on his chest...a very handsome boy. He's the only one like it I'd ever seen.

~Heather
 

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I have never seen an all black one,, our Zatarra is mostly black, tan around the eyes, on the muzzle, and all four paws, and white on the nose and chest, but the rest is black.. even the tip of the tail.. Which I found very unusual. He is the first basset or beagle I have ever seen that didn't have a white tipped tail.
 

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He is the first basset or beagle I have ever seen that didn't have a white tipped tail
That is not all that uncommon but contrary to popular belief are hounds puropsely bred for white tail tip it is a natural phenonenom of pigment cell migration from the nural crest allong the spine. It is why it is typical for a dog if it is to have white to be on the chest, muzzle tip of the tail belly or feet. These are the furthest point form the nural crest. Unlike much of coat color genetics cell migration is effected by the environment such as temperature. So it is possible for two Identical twins to end up with different marking based only on where they were in the womb.



zephyr a black blanket tri did not a a spect of white on the tail as well. A trait that is more common than many think. also a white tip on the tail is not a coat coloring requirement of the basset hound in which any type markings is acceptable.
 

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Unlike much of coat color genetics cell migration is effected by the environment such as temperature. So it is possible for two Identical twins to end up with different marking based only on where they were in the womb.
Wow, that is interesting, that means breeders could have identical dogs and not realize it (or have any way to really tell without genetic testing) because the tip of tail, muzzle and feet may be marked different.

But as far as not being bred for the white tip, or flag, I'm not so sure about that. I have just been reading that there are to genes that affect the number of pigment cells in dogs. So having not having enough pigment cells to migrate all the way to the tail could be bred for.
 

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So having not having enough pigment cells to migrate all the way to the tail could be bred for.
That would result in piebald or open tris or bi color ie one with more white rather than one with white in a specific area. It is not a matter of not having enough cells to migrate but rather how far they travel.
However there are some genetic causes for diferential pigment cell migration as well and much is still not clearly understood.


Coat Color Mutations, Animals​

For example, in animals heterozygous for a loss-of-function mutation at
Ednrb, which encodes a receptor on melanoblasts that helps stimulate migration and proliferation, every cell in the animal has reduced gene dosage for Ednrb, which lowers the threshold for additional factors ± environmental, genetic, or random ± that may cause the death of an individual melanoblast. Thus, animals with identical Ednrb mutations have different amounts of spotting, and their spots are located in different regions of the body.

...While most white-spotting mutations produce localized deficiency of melanocytes in an irregular pattern that varies among genetically identical animals, mutations that produce a regular and stereotypic pattern of spotting are easily recognized in certain species, e.g., panda bears or weasels



 

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Discussion Starter #10
Black basset

Thanks for the answers. I was really curious as there is an ad for a black basset. When I read it I figured it was a basset mix not pure. Thanks again and for the info on the white tail tips, etc.
 

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Black bassets are not unusual

A solid black basset is not common but there are plenty of "Black Bassets". My Bubba was a very beautiful black-blanket tri show dog ,his color made him that much more stunning. I am sold on this color but I want a conformationally sound dog as well. There are a few lines in conformation that are producing black-tri puppies quite often. I had posted Bubba's memorial site a little while back which is found at" Basset Hound Countries of the World" click on memorials. If you have never seen a black basset he is there. I think they are a striking color.:cool:
 

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Have you seen pictures of Brunas in the photo gallery? He looks black-white with a tinge of brown. Black and whites are stunning. Of course, I've never seen an unattractive basset!
 

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I saw a silver basset at 'Bark in the Park' this past weekend. They told us it was a Basset/Lab mix...didn't look at all like a lab....just a silver basset.
 

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You said,
"It is why it is typical for a dog if it is to have white to be on the chest, muzzle tip of the tail belly or feet. These are the furthest point form the neural crest."

Then you said,
"That would result in piebald or open tris or bi color IE: one with more white rather than one with white in a specific area. It is not a matter of not having enough cells to migrate but rather how far they travel."

so the white is in a specific area because it is the furthest from the neural crest, but limiting the amount of pigment cells to make sure a dog has some white, doesn't result in the white still being in that same specific area. That is contradictory. Certainly it would not be a sure thing, but I cannot believe the white tail flag cannot be bred for.
 

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Hmm... I have a primarily black basset however she has browned out more so as she has aged and has a bit more brown on her head, shoulders and hips. Otherwise she is a black blanket pattern with white points and ticking.



Her father is very black as well so that's where she gets it from.

 

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Basset color

Basset coloring is a funny thing and unless you have studdied genitics of how the coloring is passed from parent to pup it can be very confusing. Many pups born black will begin to develop brown/tan hairs along the ears and face and on the sides by the time the dog is full grown a puppy that started as black has a tan head and brown/tan along the body with only a blackish stripe down the back. At a very young age,even at just weeks old these tan hairs can be seen but to the untrained eye the pup will still look black. There is ,unfortunately,a blue gene in some bassets,usually not the well bred ones,that gives the coat a silver or steel blue coloring which could be why the Lab/mix coat shined silver. This paticular coloring(blue) also carries with it coat and possible skin problems as in the white dobermans.
 
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