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Our year-and-a-half old female recently started having some behavioral problems. She's been getting more aggressive about our yard and barking at passers-by, especially men and people with other dogs. We bring her in and kennel her for a time-out...or, at very least, bring her inside for a while. Twice this week, we've brought her in, told her to "go to bed," and had her refuse. When we've reached down to lead her in by her collar (an action she's never been bothered by before), she hunkers down and bites us. Both my husband and I have been badly bitten at this point. These are all things that have happened before. The only change is the biting.

She's a very mild-mannered and intelligent Basset (from what I've read from stereotypes). Aside from barking at people going past the yard, she doesn't display any obvious aggression. She is happy to lay around the house most of the time and is very tolerant of our children and even affectionate.

But I do daycare and cannot risk her hurting someone. I'm smart enough to know that there's not a quick-fix here. But I'd take some suggestions anyway...
 

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She's been getting more aggressive about our yard and barking at passers-by, especially men and people with other dogs
This is to be expected. She has learned from past experience this behavior causes them to leave. So it is contently being rehersed and reinforce.

Step one is preventing this behavior in the first place which means Se is not allowed in the Fenced yard by herself, or the fence be changed to one that she can not see through.

Step two is desensititization and counter conditioning to those thing that she has shown fear toward. ie other dogs and men.

Twice this week, we've brought her in, told her to "go to bed," and had her refuse. When we've reached down to lead her in by her collar (an action she's never been bothered by before), she hunkers down and bites us.
contrary to what Cesar Milan teaches but is clearly understood if you actual watch his shows with the sound off is that trying to physical manipulate a dog that is in a fearful or aggressive state is going to lead to a human getting bit. You need to allow the dog to calm down first or use a device that keeps you a safe distance away.

The very fact the dog has caused a serious bite, meaning when it feels the need to bite it does not inhibit the bite (lacks bite inhibition) makes this dog much more dangerious to work with than a dog with bite inhibition. Which is why I stress the importance of teaching this to puppies. Once the dog is over 6 months old It has been shown the trying to teach bite inhibition is unreliable. however before this age it is quite successfull. Given the nature of the problem and the potential dangers involved You really need professional help in creating a behavior mod program for the dogs and even then it may never be completely reliable. You need to keep this in mind given the fact you do have children in the home.

some resources for finding a certified animal behaviorist to work with

search for a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists

Consultant Locator IAABC

Directory of Certified Applied Animal Behaviorists

In the rare event there is not one located near you a number of vet schools have a remote consulting service but they can nevery be as good as having some one actual observe the dog, because a remote consulting service is limited by the biasis you bring to the observation, so while not without merit they are a second choice to having a hands on consultation

PETFAX Behavior Consultation
PETFAX is a remote consulting service for the Tufts Animal Behavior Clinic

another resource that has been helpful to many is the follow yahoo groupAGBEH
The Aggressive Behaviors in Dogs group, [Agbeh], is an educational forum offering discussions of modifying the behavior of dogs that exhibit aggressive behaviors toward dogs and/or toward people. Founded in April 1996, before we moved to Yahoo, the group today includes 3307 members from all around the world having an interest in canine behavior and training. In the group are 726 experienced dog trainers, 2581 pet owners.

Aggressive behaviors oftentimes arise from dogs' fears or anxieties. Harsh training and physical punishments are not advised for they may make the problems worse.

The good news for all is that dogs' behaviors may be modified. We teach people how to reduce tensions so as not to exacerbate the problems. Trainers and dog-behavior consultants give suggestions for safe home management and for using positive-reinforcement clicker teaching methods, including targeting, for teaching new skills. Detailed information is also provided about desensitizing and counter conditioning (D/CC) a dog to various stimuli to change the dog's emotional responses. Only "dog-friendly" recommendations are permitted. No physical punishment-based methods are advocated. No choke chain corrections, no prong collars, no electronic shock collars!
some articles that you may find helpful


Explains why she does not listen to you when in a fearfull/aggressive state


Lowering Arousal: How to Train Impulse Control


Calming Signals

CANINE STRESS SIGNS

Management and the Aggressive Dog

Tying Dogs Out

Your Dog Barks Out of the Window? That Could Lead to Aggression
Barrier Frustration can occur if a dog is behind a window, fence, or on leash and is not allowed to interact with the environment. After a while, she may get frustrated and aggressive. One indicator of Barrier Frustration having a part in aggression is if a dog barks behind barriers and is calm around dogs when off-leash, but is very aggressive behind a barrier or on-leash.
Working with a Difficult Dog
 

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I also have for many years mixed dogs and daycare. Its challenging but I believe an esential part of raising the next generation to be responsible pet owners.

A couple of things that will help you get through the days until you can get professional assessment and assistance. (It is worth the money you pay!! and I agree with Mickey T "Given the nature of the problem and the potential dangers involved you really need professional help in creating a behavior mod program for the dog." )

1. Use the tried and true childcare approach of distract!! Find a strongly scented treat for bribe/reward to get her where you want her instead of using her collar.

2. Always have a short lead dragging when she goes out so you can grab it not her collar to control her.

3. If you have trained your dog to spray bottle, your hose will do the same thing with more distance for outside use.
 
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