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I was wondering if you heard how your friends dog is doing after the rabies vaccine problem- I hope everything turned out OK-
 

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Oh, the little pup is fine now. Our doctor friend told her to get Benadryl and an anti-inflammatory in her as soon as possible, then make her some chicken soup or something. She did, and the pup stayed conked out under her bankie most of the day, then came to that evening and was back to her old self.

In other words, sounds like she had an allergic reaction to too many shots being given at once.

Now they're busy planning her birthday party, at which she'll wear a tiny sombrero and enjoy pinatas filled with dog treats. Pastels de carne (meatloaf) will be served. :lol: :lol: For real! I've been invited, but i don't think i can get across the border in time. :rolleyes: :lol:
 

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when the wife and i were in Puerto Vallarta we were talking to the taxi drivers and they were telling us about the dogs just running around,no leash laws ,shots, license nothing.seen a few nice looking dogs dead on the road,drivers told us they see at least one hit a day.right after he tells us this we almost got one.
 

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Yea, Billy, it's true. Cora (the pup in question) is a former street dog, and the veterinary care down there is not great, which is how the pup got into trouble in the first place. It's sure not the U. S., where a lot of dogs get much better health care than people. :unsure:
 

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A long time ago, when Lightning was only a year or so old, he had a reaction to a vaccination. It happened really fast--he started rubbing his face (which was very quickly swelling up) on the carpet maniacally and throwing up everywhere. Luckily I lived very near the vet's office and got him right back so they could give him a shot. He's never had another reaction since, but I still stay at the vet's for awhile after he gets his shots just in case.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
A long time ago, when Lightning was only a year or so old, he had a reaction to a vaccination. It happened really fast--he started rubbing his face (which was very quickly swelling up) on the carpet maniacally and throwing up everywhere. Luckily I lived very near the vet's office and got him right back so they could give him a shot. He's never had another reaction since, but I still stay at the vet's for awhile after he gets his shots just in case.[/b]
As I said in my reply to biscuit's original post, Murray's had strange rections to vaccinations and I always dread it when he needs them.

We titre now, and stagger the shots over 2 visits when he needs them, but I'm always a wreck worrying about what might happen. Staying at the vets for a while after the shot is given is something I do too.

I'm glad the Mexican doggie is OK
 

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Not trying to hyjack the thread, but...what does it mean when you say you titre now? I tried to Google it, but I was unsuccessful.

On another note I'm glad to hear that the Mexican dog is doing well.

~Heather
 

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Not trying to hyjack the thread, but...what does it mean when you say you titre now? I tried to Google it, but I was unsuccessful.

On another note I'm glad to hear that the Mexican dog is doing well.

~Heather[/b]

My vet has Murray on a 3 year protocol for vaccinations, and has used the titre test after the 3 years for vaccinations other than rabies. According to this article linked below,"Nearly all previously vaccinated adult dogs are immune to parvovirus and distemper, and the titer test isn't going to give you any useful information." so the titre would probaly not be useful for most folks, but because Murray is a therapy dog I have to provide documentation showing that he is up to date on all his immunizations, and the pet therapy organization accepts the titre results as proof that he's immunized. I can't get around the rabies vaccine, he has to have that every 3 years regardless.

Anyway, when I googled 'canine vaccinatin titre', this is what I found:

Link to article:

http://www.caberfeidh.com/CanineTiters.htm

Quote:

"What Is a Titer Test?

A "titer" is a measurement of how much antibody to a certain virus (or other antigen) is circulating in the blood at that moment. Titers are usually expressed in a ratio, which is how many times they could dilute the blood before they couldn't find antibodies anymore. If the lab was able to dilute it two times, and then didn't find any more antibodies, that would be expressed as a titer of 1:2. If they could dilute it a thousand times before they couldn't find any antibodies, that would be a titer of 1:1000.

Titer testing is usually done in dogs for the most common and deadly canine viruses, parvovirus (CPV) and distemper (CDV). Rabies titer testing is also done, usually for purposes of travel to foreign countries that require it. Some viruses have unusual antibody patterns (such as FIP in cats or HIV in humans), but we do not have vaccines for any diseases of this type in dogs. Also, bacterial antibodies differ from viral antibodies in a number of ways, and bacterial titer testing is typically done in veterinary medicine as a means of diagnosing acute illness, not monitoring vaccine response or ongoing immunity.



So, should you test your dog's titers? Probably not. Nearly all previously vaccinated adult dogs are immune to parvovirus and distemper, and the titer test isn't going to give you any useful information. You cannot make an immune dog more immune to a virus with additional vaccination, as the previous immunity will wipe out the virus in the vaccine. There will be no increase in immunity and no benefit to the dog. (Schultz, Ronald D., "Current and future canine and feline vaccination programs", Veterinary Medicine, March 1998.) If a titer test will give you peace of mind, or help you make a vaccination decision about a puppy or a dog of unknown vaccine history, then it's worth considering. But for most owners of well-vaccinated adult dogs, neither re-vaccination nor titer testing for parvovirus and distemper are necessary."
 

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Okay, thank you for the clarification.

~Heather
 
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