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I have a basset that is a duffus and stresses my wife out. He is around 75lbs and able to reach up and sniff around o our kitchen table/ counter tops. He isn't trying to be malicious but is constantly underfoot (wanting to be part of the fam) and he adds stress to my wife in her dealing with three kids.

In search of advice on what to do next? I don't want to just "get rid of him" like she wants to, but I also want to distress her life a little.
 

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I don't really understand the issue here, this isn't a Basset thing, this is just a dog thing, and not even a bad dog thing. Maybe train him to go to his bed on command and use that when he's being annoying? Don't leave stuff on counters he can get because that reinforces it. Walk through him (don't kick him, just move through him and not around to get from A to B) to teach him to get out from underfoot.

You're really considering getting rid of him because of this?

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I am not considering it, but if my wife had her way, he would have been gone long ago... basically, looking for advice on dealing with a stressed wife that doesn't care for the dog.

To be fair, he does need to be bathed more than I do it- which would cut down on the oily dog smell but wouldn't touch the shedding...
 

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I am not considering it, but if my wife had her way, he would have been gone long ago... basically, looking for advice on dealing with a stressed wife that doesn't care for the dog.

To be fair, he does need to be bathed more than I do it- which would cut down on the oily dog smell but wouldn't touch the shedding...
That really seems like an issue with her more than the dog. Not sure how that can be fixed, sounds like she just doesn't like dogs.

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"which would cut down on the oily dog smell but wouldn't touch the shedding..."


it would cut down on the shedding for a day or two

Clearly you wife is not a dog person you need to create a confined space for the dog that is bigger than a crate but keeps out of the wife's way and is dog proof area he does not need constant supervision. Best if in an area where the dog is still part of the goings on. If in a room it which it can not see the family but hear them barking is likely to become an issue. This is an idea situation for an X-pen the normal light weight one would need a method of secure such as attack at point one or more panels to the wall. The heavy duty e-pens by best pet are much more stable and secure free standing but evn better if they are secured as well https://www.amazon.com/BestPet-Hammertone-Playpen-Exercise-40-Inch/dp/B003XU0H9I/ref=br_lf_m_r2zkdd27v5k4p5u_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&s=pet-supplies


Benefits of Dog Play Pen for Outdoor and Indoor Use

https://bestdogcratesandbeds.com/dog-playpens-must-have/

Long Term Confinement


the advantages of the pen is this. It allows the dog to remain apart of the family while at the same time relieves the pressure on the wife of constantly having to supervising the dog
 

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Oh this is just soooooo sad! And I'd have to agree that the reason why your wife has problems with this poor dog is because she has more than enough to cope with already. It's easy to be wise after the event but if your wife already has 3 small kids to take care of, adding any dog, never mind a Basset, was probably always going to be step too far. So how many questions did his breeder ask of you before letting you have one of her Basset puppies I wonder? Letting a puppy, again of any breed, but especially a Basset, go to a home with kids of under at least 5, wasn't anything I'd have done. Knowing what a full-on job looking after a Basset pup was going to be.

Yes, they can have a houndy smell, for the uninitiated but constant bathing and so shedding, shouldn't have been needed, or done. And the correct diet may help with this problem.

Is there a breeder around still because this is who you should approach for help, or if it comes to this, taking him back to find him a permanent home where he will be loved, and understood.

Now is probably not the time for your family to have a dog. Sorry.
 

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Grooming wipes will help with smell. Also teach the dog to "place or settle". Get a small rug or I use a folded fuzzy throw I can wash. When the dog is hungry, use some treats....feed him several in a row to get attention. Now put the rug/throw in an out of the way spot in the room. Chances are good he will go check it out...say YES! Place! and give a treat. Call him over to you and repeat....don't help him figure it out, really it will take a bit of time at first but he will but it together. Associate getting a treat with the throw. At first reward when he goes to the throw, but eventually make him figure the treat comes when he is ON the throw. Keep this up in short sessions daily, and add a verbal "Place" or "Settle" command. Really....this will work. You can also move the "Place" on the floor next to your chair. Reward him for staying on it. When he is in the way...tell him to Place and off he will go. Might even work on the kids.... You can google this....about the dog that is not the kids....
 

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A major consideration owning any dog/hound, is whether it's really wanted & included as a cherished member of the family.
There's been a very interesting post (on another place) about researching, asking those in the breed for finding the right dog/breed that suits individual circumstances & families, all have different traits & personalities. There's so much more to choosing a breed other than it's look, so sad when owners are attracted to a pup or breed without thinking whether it will suit their expectations, needs or even wanted by everyone. AND just as importantly if not more so, whether the dogs needs are considered, they are sentient beings, not some household purchase.
Basshole :( joke term or other, would think of him first & find a loving home with someone whose has the time, experience & where his needs will be considered.
 

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The saddest thing here is what's bothering the wife isn't even a breed thing, it's barely even a training thing (although training can mitigate the behavior if you don't like it). This is a dog thing that like 90% of dogs do, even well trained ones.

I'm willing to warrant she'd have the exact same complaint about virtually any other dog or dog breed, unless it was a stuffed dog perhaps. And I'm willing to bet if it wasn't this same thing it would be something else minor that dogs do. I don't think this is a case of "this isn't the right dog for the family", this sounds like "this family shouldn't have dogs at this point in time, if ever". What will happen to this pup if it develops an actual behavioral issue, or health issue, or just gets old? If the line in the sand is behaviors that most dog owners wished was their biggest problem, what happens when bigger problems arise? Sorry to sound harsh but that's what I'm getting from the posts.

Overall I think it might be better to find another home for the pup while he has a higher chance of being adopted. A breed specific rescue is a great option if the breeder is not in the picture. Hell, I'd take him if I could convince my father, sounds like a very well behaved pup to me.



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I also just want to add that I'm not trying to diss your wife, it just sounds like she isn't really a dog person, and that's perfectly understandable. If she really doesn't like the dog though, I think it's unfair to the hound AND her to keep one in the house. This is why one of the first questions reputable breeders and rescues ask is if EVERYONE in the family is looking at, and excited about, getting a dog. It's a huuugeee reason why dogs end up in shelters or returned to breeders/rescues.

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Can I suggest that if you do have to rehome your baby, try to find a basset rescue. Most areas have one close. We have one in Las Vegas and dogs go very fast and most go to people who already have a Basset or hound in their home. It’s very sad, but sometimes you have to do what is best for the whole family.

I have a 7 month old Basset and I am finding ‘place or settle’ the hardest thing to teach. He is so bonded to me that I don’t even get to go to the bathroom alone. He has even jumped in the tub with me!

My husband got a Springer Spaniel when my son was 4 and it was a nightmare! That dog was my nemesis! Hyper and loud and stole everything off the counter. He chewed up everything. He didn’t settle down until he hit about 3. We get along and I love him, but he will never be my favorite nor I his. He is 7 now and he is great with my son and with his little brother Basset. Sometimes, if you stick it out, they can be really worth it.
 

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How old is your Basset? Have you had him since he was a puppy?

Nothing you describe is at all unusual for any breed. If this behavior drives (and your wife) to distraction, it might not be an ideal fit for you to be dog owners.

Dogs do need and want boundaries. You need to be the "alpha". If this isn't in your personality or doesn't fit your lifestyle, please find a basset rescue that will find a suitable home for him. Do the right thing for you,your family, and the dog.
 
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