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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The weather is finally warming up in Idaho and we decided to take the kids and dogs for a 4 miles bike ride. Emma who just turned 7 months just couldn't make it. We were barely out of our subdivision (1mile) and she went flat on us. In the end I had to drag her home while my husband, kids and other dog Oscar continued. I know bassets are probably not the best hiking companions but Emma is so laid back and literally I was pulling her the whole way back!!! Do you think their stamina can improve through training? Or it's just a breed thing? We are nervous to take her on more adventurous hikes now because we don't want her to go flat in the middle of it. She loves to play but overall I think not super active for a puppy. She'll rather eat or sniff around. And she's lean and really healthy. I wonder if its a personality thing or we can train her to be a biking companion.


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They can get more stamina when full grown, but we aren't talking about sled dog. When they have enough, they will flat basset. I had one who did it so often that I put a folding luggage cart in my backpack. Felt silly rolling along like that, but it was easier than carrying him.


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Maddie's never gone 'flat basset' on a walk, but when she's ready to stop, she turns towards home and it's pretty much a done deal for going in any other direction.
 

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My goodness, she's only 7 months and she hasn't been conditioned for a long hike! That's kinda like dragging your 12 year kid old off the couch and expecting them to do a marathon.

Most people are going to want to bike too fast for the average basset to do extended periods. However, once they've been conditioned and built up endurance there's no reason they can't handle a hike on foot.
 

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Our boy is not too bothered about running fast he just enjoys sniffing EVERYTHING. Our walks take so long because of the sniffing so I have to get up extra early in the mornings to give him a good walk before I head out to work x


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just like any exercise you have to slowly build up to it but a basset should be able to go all day. Ours went hiking with us all the time 10-15 miles a day no problem
 

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just like any exercise you have to slowly build up to it but a basset should be able to go all day. Ours went hinking with us all the time 10-15 miles a day no problem
You do indeed - have to slowly build up :D And I suggest you take heed of what she's telling you ..... at 7 months you should only just be starting on getting her muscle-tone building up so her heavy bone and immature joints are properly supported. A mile is plenty enough for a 7 month old puppy, who probably hasn't yet done anything like that much exercise either.

4 miles at 7 months? :eek: Perfect way to end up at 12 months with an unsound Basset. For sure, once over a year, and with those muscles there, then she'll be good to go, as far or as little as you want to do with her.

ps The weather may be improving, but remember not to expect her to walk in the heat of the day - early morning/late evening. Heat stroke is all too easy to strike and I've seen it a couple of times, in dark-coated dogs. Believe me, it wasn't pretty. Also Bassets prefer to 'sniff around' rather than go on organised walks, usually.
 

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as for the bike ride we modified one of the pull behind two child bike carts. Snuggy love going for a bike ride toughy on the other hand would jump out as soon a the bike moved,
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you everyone for your advice! We do 1-2 miles walk all the time and she's great with that. That's why we thought we can see if she can push a little more and go further. Apparently not. Oh well we'll just have to do more of the leisure walks and dog parks stuff with her instead. Yes she'll rather sniff everything along the way than a focused walk. It's good to know its possible to build up her stamina over time.....


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at 7 months you should only just be starting on getting her muscle-tone building up so her heavy bone and immature joints are properly supported.
I disagree in that by having and building muscle throughout the developmental stage it the way to prevent abnormal orthopeadic problems.

Nutrition also plays a big part for endurance actives nothing beats fat for an energy source for dogs. and it has been shown that even in unconditioned dogs a high fat diet help

http://www.hilarywatson.com/athletes.pdf
 

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http://www.tualatinkc.org/pdf/Optimal%20Nutrition%20for%20the%20Exercising%20Dog.pdf

Although an increase in dietary fat is important to exercising canines, the type of fat also
provides critical benefits that can translate into optimal performance. Polyunsaturated fatty acids
(PUFA) like omega-3's, particularly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid
(DHA), are largely derived from fish and have important nutritional benefits. EP A has been
shown to serve as a substrate for COX-2 enzymes and is considered to be a less-inflammatory
fatty acid compared to omega-6 fatty acids like arachidonic acid. Nutrients like EP A,
glucosamine, strong antioxidants and increased protein intake can all contribute to optimizing​
performance by promoting a healthy skeletal system

...
Also, feeding a performance diet all year long will assist in maintaining the
dog's metabolic capacity, even when not in training or exercising, and contribute to maintaining
lean body condition and optimal health. This can be achieved by reducing the feeding portion
during the off-season or periods of reduced activity to complement the caloric needs to maintain​
proper body condition.

 

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Feeding for Performance :: Purina Pro Club

"Exercise metabolism for a hardworking dog is best when fat is used for producing energy for muscles," Zanghi says. "Fat promotes and supports endurance exercise, which is what most hardworking dogs require for optimal performance."
Nutrition studies have shown that feeding dogs a food with higher levels of fat will result in more fatty acids in the blood before exercise. These fatty acids, important for hardworking dogs that perform endurance-based exercise, can contribute 60 percent or more energy during the first two hours of exercise. The increased fatty acids continue even after exercise compared to foods with lower fat and high carbohydrates. More fatty acids in the blood mean more nutrients to promote endurance metabolism.

...Generally, performance dogs should be fed a minimum of 10 to 12 hours before exercise," Zanghi says. "It is best to feed the night before a trial that is scheduled the next morning. When dogs are fed six hours or sooner before exercise, the body's fat burning enzymes are not optimized, which contributes to reduced endurance and energy generation. Studies have shown that endurance performance can be as much as doubled when dogs run on an empty stomach compared to having eaten four or less hours before exercise."
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Oh and I have to correct myself too. Only the kids and my husband were on the bike. Emma and I walked. So I should say she really doesn't even want to walk for more 1-2 miles. We always do a variety of stuff with them and I think her fav is to just run and sniff freely in a big enclosed dog park. Even when Oscar does all the fetches, she couldn't care for the ball.


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@franksmum:

At 7 months, we were limited with ours due to her joint problems but we did 'work up to' longer walks.

we increased it gradually and she did well with that.

@PB--- that's adorable!
 

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I disagree in that by having and building muscle throughout the developmental stage it the way to prevent abnormal orthopeadic problems.
Once again. We are talking about 4 mile hikes for a 7 month Basset here, which is way different to doing all this gradually!! Of course a puppy needs to be able to run around so the muscle build up starts from an early age. Unlike the obvious false ideas you seem to have about what's going on in the UK with Bassets, mine were not wrapped in cotton wool for the first months of life :rolleyes: It's just all about using common sense. When a Basset goes into the Basset flop, it helps to recognise that just maybe he's being asked to do more than he can/should physically be asked to do. Big bone, and substance, needs bringing along with care - fact. Those hounds that do not have the desired big bone or substance stand less chance of picking up an injury in the early months.

I am rather worried that much of your links/quotes do appear to cover dog breeds in general (not always) and this can be misleading as Bassets are unique, and as such it's unwise to bring them on exactly as with any puppy. I'm not talking molly-coddling them, but being sensible. There's no doubt that if a Basset is put together right, it should stay right, with sensible rearing. Looking at some of the examples on here, cute as they may be, this is obviously far from the case (some are not right, from the get-go)

Very rarely have we had a crippled Basset bringing them on as we have always done - which over 40+ years, should suggest I'm not totally wrong
 

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am rather worried that much of your links/quotes do appear to cover dog breeds in general (not always) and this can be misleading as Bassets are unique, and as such it's unwise to bring them on exactly as with any puppy. I'm not talking molly-coddling them, but being sensible
that is were we disagree If the breed must be treated differently than other breeds then it is too exagerated and one need to look at what is being prodiuced rather than telling everyone else to modify how it is raised , This is not a basset issue but goes for all breed such as for brachi's dogs lile pugs and bulldogs. If you start making the face so short it can't breath properly you have gone to far, 4 miles for a 7 mnth puppy is not too far if it is conditioned to do so, 4 miles is to far if it has only gone a mile or so before. The biggest risk of injury are not from conditioned athletes but from weekend warrior that do nothing all week then over do it for a day or two. So Yes there is some common sense and reasonablenss that needs to apply but a single uniform rule that does not take into account other circumstances is useless and borderline dangerious, you advice on basset is much like telling a human chile to wait till they are 18 and an adult before doing any sports not realistic and not helpful,

I would suggest this is because they are never asked to be dog as adult or as puppies and as such they are very limited. and for the record I could say the same thing except its more like 25-30 years Antidotal evidence only gets you so far, and in the case is pretty useless. that said the scientific evidence is scant to non exsistent as well so maybe in 20 -30 year we will know who was right maybe not At this point I feel compelled to use what knoweledge there is on the importance of exercise in species other than dogs to suppliment thw lack of know we have in dogs,

Exercise in Puppies-Are there rules? | The SkeptVet Blog
"The research evidence, then, really does not provide anything like a definitive answer to questions about the effects of exercise in growing puppies. Common sense suggests that forcing a dog to exercise heavily when it does not wish to is not a good idea. Likewise, puppies sometimes have more enthusiasm than sense and can exercise to the point of heat exhaustion, blistered footpads, and other damage that may be less obvious. Therefore, a general principle of avoiding forced or voluntary extreme exercise is reasonable, but specific and absolute statements about what kind of exercise is allowed, what surfaces puppies should or should not exercise on, and so forth is merely opinion not supported by objective data. Such opinions may very well be informed by personal experience, and they may be reliable, but any opinion not founded on objective data must always be taken with a grain of salt and accepted provisionally until such data is available."
 

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Mikey T - selective quoting can be very misleading too. :rolleyes: And although of course some of what you say in your latest is true, not all of it. Again a Basset IS unique and with or without exaggeration, common sense should be exercised when it comes to early exercise, forced exercise (as in road work). The trouble is many people buying into the breed for the first time don't use 'common sense', drag their hounds everywhere from a very young age which is why, I suggest, novice owners need to be advised to take it easy with this breed, as puppies. Again IF they have the heavy bone and substance called for, which makes a Basset a Basset, then care needs to be taken early on, so they reach maturity still sound.

And again, from some of the pictures I've seen here (and the questions too), it's evident that you cannot treat a Basset puppy as you would, say, a Jackie puppy!!

The protocol (not over-exercising a puppy until it's at least 6 months, and then gradually building it up until it's a year old) isn't something new by a long way as I've already written (relevant quotes). Even when the UK Basset was far from heavy and 'overdone' this was the norm.

I'm afraid you are not going to persuade me otherwise - and certainly not by suggesting the Basset (puppy) should not be treated differently to most other breeds

Edit. I was checking at what age a Foxhound is able to start hunting

"Bitches are normally 'put to' early in the New Year so that the puppies are born in the spring. Puppies will be weaned at 10 to 12 weeks and sent out to 'walk' with local farmers and/or hunt supporters. They will remain at walk for as long as possible into the following autumn/winter before returning to the kennels. In the spring they will be integrated into the main pack as they are walked out twice daily.
During their second summer they will be brought to fitness for hunting by daily hound exercise. It is during this process of 'walking out' and 'hound exercise' that they will learn to respond to the calls of the huntsman.
The young hounds, as they are called, will start hunting in their second autumn aged approximately 18 months."
And this is with a hound who is not as 'structurally challenged' as the Basset.
 

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common sense should be exercised when it comes to early exercise, forced exercise (as in road work).
certainly I agree the difference lie in what is actual common sense. The same is true of any exercise that can cause trauma such as jumping. It is why jumping in agility with puppies is limited to elbow height till the growth plates are closed. Just saying the 5 minute per day every month a pup is old is arbitrary depending on what has ocured previously in the dogs development it could be way to little or even way to much exercise. and as such I do not think it is not a usefull concept. Wer have puppies out in the field hunting an hour or more at six months even earlier with no ill effects but they have been conditioned to it and are off leash, no compulsion.

"The protocol (not over-exercising a puppy until it's at least 6 months, and then gradually building it up until it's a year old)" nothing wrong with that protocol . I would go so far as to say you should never Over-exercise your dog. But the devil is in the details and what constitutes over-exercise. A walk at a baseet hounda typical pace is hardly exercise at all. Now if the puppy is required to keep up with a jogging human it is totally different, thats the point. It is not about no exercise it is about appropriate execise for that particular dog based on the exercise it has had and its development there is no one size fits all solution,
 
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