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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello. I am interesting when bassethound stop growing in heigh and start fills up. Is normal for a basset to have 14 inches (in shoulder) in 5 month of life?

Thank you.
 

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14 inches tall at 5 months? Wow, are you sure he is a purebred basset?
 

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the best reference I have found on this is


Large and Giant Breed Growth by royal canin


The ADG[average daily gain] peaks in largebreed and giant-breed puppies between 3 and 5 months. By month 5, weight gain is slowing down and the rhythm falls even more noticeably from month 8.​


looking at the growth chart at 5 month a large breed puppy is 65 -70% of it adult weight

I believe toughy was about 14" at that age he finishe up at or just above 15 inchs wich is the cut of height for the breed to participate in conformation and field trials.
If you are concern about the hieght of the dog and it is not spayed or nuetures you want to refrain from doing so spaying and nuetering delays growth plate closure and results in a taller dog on average about 1/4"
 

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I had a basset in the early 90's that grew that fast. He ended up having lameness issues. I'd be careful that he doesn't go up and down stairs and stuff until he finished growing.
 

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Learn something new every day; I still have a lot to learn about bassets!
 

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Virga stopped growing about 6 months I think. In height and length that is. She's definitely put on weight though and her chest is starting to deepen.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
14 inches tall at 5 months? Wow, are you sure he is a purebred basset?
Why the sarcasm? I just wondered. In my country there is no basset forum..I ask you guys here. Our vet told us that that is ok and that they should stop growing in height only start filling up...and I noticed that my basset is very skinny now and not so rounded&hung as 1-2 months ago and don't eat too much despite I try to make my best in quality feeding diet. I am careful with stairs, we always take elevator. :)
http://www.dishydog.com/images/wither_dog.jpg

red line is - 10.6 and black line is 14 inches. Did I measure ok? Ty for infos.
 

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The largest pure-bred basset I ever saw was 90 lbs, and not because he was overweight. He was the father of a group of puppies I was looking at. If I hadn't seen his AKC, I would have thought he was half blood hound. He was certainly not show quality, but he was all basset.
 

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NO! form the stand point of bone structure bassets are a large breed with short legs. The suffer the sam sorts or orthopeadic problems of large breeds not that of small and medium. OFten times the weights don't dictated but from a structural and growth stand point they are much more similar to large and giant breeds than small and medium breeds.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
NO! form the stand point of bone structure bassets are a large breed with short legs. The suffer the sam sorts or orthopeadic problems of large breeds not that of small and medium. OFten times the weights don't dictated but from a structural and growth stand point they are much more similar to large and giant breeds than small and medium breeds.

ty ...btw my basset looks now like that one on your avatar. Her sister is also more athletic type...but her brother is heavy chunky type.
 

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btw my basset looks now like that one on your avatar. Her sister is also more athletic type
HE may have competed in agility but no own would ever consider him athletic. He was not "worlds slowest agility dog" for nothing:rolleyes:


The athelete have been the females Macey who is more of a conformation build was a lot more athletic.

Buford and Macey
macey is second basset


and the real athlete @ 7
Mariah
 

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can someone explain, uh, what are the advantages of large breed puppy food over regular puppy food? and also, what are the advantages over adult food?

merci.
--Worm
(we just bought a new bag of large breed puppy food today, so were curious...)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I am also interested when bassethounds stop growing in height and start filling up?
How tall is your bassethounds and how long are their legs?
 

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can someone explain, uh, what are the advantages of large breed puppy food over regular puppy food? and also, what are the advantages over adult food?

merci.
--Worm
(we just bought a new bag of large breed puppy food today, so were curious...)
It has to do with bone growth. A 7 pound puppy that will top out at 10 pounds doesn't have to put on as much strong bone as a 7 pound puppy that is heading to 60 pounds.
 

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I was told with my rottie to NOT use large breed formulas because it makes them grow too fast and can cause problems later on. Was that wrong info? It was from my vet. It has been years though so don't know if that still applies.
 

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Was that wrong info? It was from my vet. It has been years though so don't know if that still applies.
yes it was wrong an keep in mind nutrition is not part of the training of most vets. Large bread formulas have reduced caloric content than regular puppy food so it does just the opposite but the most important control is how much food you put in the bowl and keep the dog thin from the American Rotti Club If it was years ago there was no large breed puppy food so the choice was between high calorie puppy food and lower calorie adult food under those conditions the adult food was generally a better choice but thing have changed with large breed puppy food.

Dog Diet Do's and Don’t's
According to Dr. Tony Buffington, Professor of Clinical Nutrition, Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine, your puppy can be fed a regimen of specific caloric intake compared to his body condition score (BCS), using a simple one to five scale, from overly thin to obese. Using manufacturer feeding recommendations as an initial starting point, feed your puppy to a score of two and maintain this weight until he's fully grown.


Feed whatever amount is necessary to maintain a BCS of two during the growth period, realizing that dogs have varying growth rates and activity levels. Once his adult stature is achieved, you may allow him to reach a score of three.


...2 = Thin - Ribs easily palpated and may be visible with no palpable fat. Tops of lumbar vertebrae visible. Pelvic bones less prominent. Obvious waist and abdominal tuck.
There was once a theory that too high a protein level lead caused to much muscle growth and size. This has been proven to be false. The problem is simply over nutrition to much caloric intake which is easly controlled by what is put in the bowl.

The biggest adjustment of large breed puppy food vs puppy food and adult food is calcium levels and the calcium and phosporus level. Puppies can not control blood calcium levels. To much calcium lead to a buch of orthopeadic problems in large and giant breed from ocd, hod etc It was once thought that they need more calcium but they actual need less.

Optimal feeding of large breed puppies

Large breeds of dogs are predisposed to these problems because they have the genetic potential for excessively rapid growth. In rapidly growing, large breed puppies, maximal growth, and therefore increased body weight, can cause stress on the immature developing skeleton. Large breed dogs have decreased bone density compared to smaller breed dogs at this stage (Dammrich, 1991). Additionally, fast bone growth results in structural defects of bones that are in turn unable to accommodate an increased body weight (Dammrich, 1991).


...Many breeders and dog fanciers advocate calcium supplementation for growing pups. Calcium supplements should never be recommended for dogs eating commercially available diets designed for growth. Excess calcium is potentially very detrimental to the development of a healthy skeleton. Unlike adult animals, puppies appear to have inefficient mechanisms for regulating how much dietary calcium they absorb from the food. This can result in absorption and retention of more calcium, especially when the dietary calcium is high (Hazewinkel et. al., 1991, Tryfonidou, 2002). The excessive calcium may result in skeletal malformation (Hazewinkel et. al. 1985). Excess calcium can also cause deficiencies in other nutrients, especially zinc (Wedekind, et. al. 1998). Feeding a diet with too little calcium is equally problematic. Many home prepared diets for pets are lacking in calcium. In this case, the skeletal system must provide the calcium for the rest of the body, and brittle, malformed bones are the result



...The common practice of feeding commercially available adult dog foods to puppies can also be detrimental. The broad category of adult canine maintenance foods contains diets with a wide range of nutrient profiles, caloric densities, and mineral contents. Some foods marketed for adult maintenance have passed AAFCO feeding tests for growth, but some have not. Regardless, in some instances, these diets provide more calcium per calorie and/or have more calories per cup than growth diets designed for large breed puppies. A large breed growth diet that has passed AAFCO animal feeding tests should be fed at least until the puppy reaches about 80% of the expected adult weight, and it will not be detrimental to keep a healthy, lean puppy on growth formula until full adult size is achieved. Above all, remember to feed a large breed growth formula in sufficient quantities to maintain a lean body condition, and avoid additional supplements.

Feeding Large Breed Puppies


Food For Thought™ Technical Bulletin No. 72R


. Research has shown that
  • dietary protein levels from 15 to 32% have no adverse effect on skeletal development. 1
  • Body condition decreases as protein gets too low.
...Several studies have shown increases in developmental bone problems when a diet was overfed. 2, 3

...The rumors that large- and giant-breed puppies need extra calcium are untrue! Excess calcium has been shown in several studies to increase the chances of developmental bone problems. 4, 5, 6Plus, puppies cannot control intestinal absorption of calcium as well from diets containing high levels.

Our large breed diets are formulated with 0.8 to 0.9% calcium and 0.7% phosphorus which is deliberately less than the amounts in all of our other puppy foods.
Nutrition in Large Breed Puppies
By far the most important influence on the skeletal development of large breed puppies is total calories. Excess calories leads to more rapid growth and excess body weight, and these are associated with increased incidence of hip dysplasia, OCD, and elbow dysplasia.[4-8] Lower calorie diets do not reduce the ultimate stature a dog will achieve, but they reduce the rate of growth so that this size is achieved smoothly over the growth period rather than in a rapid burst.[9] This slower, more steady growth leads to fewer developmental orthopedic problems. he appropriate number of calories needed for optimal growth is different for every individual and depends on many factors. The best guideline for how much to feed is body condition. Several scoring systems are available

...As with most nutrients, there is an optimal range of calcium levels for growing dogs. Both too much and not enough calcium can lead to developmental bone problems. For large breed dogs, this optimal range is narrower than for other breeds, and excessive levels of calcium cause OCD and other bone disorders earlier and with more severe consequences. While not all studies agree, the majority show a strong link between high calcium levels in the diet and bone problems, even when the levels of calories and other nutrients are the same. Though the level of calcium which increases the risk of skeletal problems varies with age, a calcium level of 210-540mg calcium per kilogram of body weight per day appears safe for large breed puppies of all ages. It is also important not to add vitamin and mineral supplements containing calcium to properly balanced puppy diets as this is very likely to increase calcium intake beyond safe levels. [2,5,10-12]

...Many breeders and pet owners, as well as some veterinarians believe too much protein can contribute to developmental skeletal disorders in large breed puppies, but this is incorrect. An early study [5] observed orthopedic problems in dogs fed diets high in calories, protein, and calcium, but subsequent studies clarified that protein is not a risk factor for any of these problems.

...
The best way to meet the optimal dietary requirements for large breed puppies is with a commercial diet specifically designed for this purpose. Though many people recommend feeding an adult food, with the idea that it is lower in calories than regular puppy food, adult diets vary widely in calorie content, so this is not automatically true. Additionally, adult diets are not usually appropriately restricted in calcium content. It is also important not to add vitamin and mineral supplements containing calcium to properly balanced puppy diets as this is very likely to increase calcium intake beyond safe levels.





 

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Thanks Mikey :) Like I said, it was years ago (that dog passed away in January actually). Since someone asked about the large breed puppy info figured I would ask about it too! My vet is also pretty "old school" and isn't necessarily up to date on all the fancy testing and such. I hate to leave my vet but after my rottie passed away, I think any major issues will be sent to the vet 20 miles away. I bet my vet retires in the next couple of years anyway but he is sooooo good and kind with animals, even when they are growling at him lmao!
 
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