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Here she is standing, sitting and kinda walking. As you can see, the left front is relatively straight, pointing only slightly outward, whereas the right front is markedly crooked and pointing more sharply outward.

When we first noticed the limp we had our vet check her out. He found some tenderness and guarding in her right shoulder and prescribed Anti-Inflams, which reduced the limp after a couple of days.

She was fine until she grew some and we noticed the crook. She sometimes limps. Sometimes doesn't. Usually right after she wakes up and when she's been exerting herself (She and the cat love to chase the red dot). Sometimes she'll even spin out on the right leg, while doing a drift around a corner. No real indications of significant pain, and the limp can come and go.

She is still young, so her chest hasn't filled in yet. We did get her spayed at 6 months. Why would that amplify any genetic issues? Or is it a hormonal thing? In any event, she's smart as a whip. Was housebroken in a couple of weeks. Learned to "sit" for treats in a few days. We wouldn't give her up for the world, just want to know what we can do to limit any discomfort, especially as she ages.
 

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The loss of sex hormones delay growth plate closure early nuetered/spayed dogs average 1/4" taller than intact. some Growth plates start to close before six months of age. Spaying at this time is thought to have an adverse effect on bone pairs. like in the forearm and lower rear leg and lead to or exacerbate incongruities (ie bone pairs of unequal length)
It is well documented that early spay increase incidence of Hip dysplasia and CCL ruptures. as compared to intact dogs.

In the first picture it she is likely Knuckled under in addition to the point pointing to far out. It has been my experience this tends to create bigger problems than turning out with limp and long term.

Knuckling over is caused by excessive laxticity in the carpal (wrist) tendons. There is no surgical fix supporting the area with a brace may help and lessen chances of arthritis developing. and pain in the near term



this is a pretty sever example.

Think of the front leg of the dog as your arm. the paw =your hand. Joint closest to the ground is called carpal joint (wrist) next is the elbow. Note the in this dog the Carpal joint(wrist) is far forward and in front of the paw. ie knuckled over The entire paw should be forward of the wrist

some threads from the forum on this issue

http://www.basset.net/boards/general-basset-hound-discussion/12875-odd-leg-posture-normal.html

http://www.basset.net/boards/general-basset-hound-discussion/45193-advice-knuckling-over-front-leg-brace.html

http://www.basset.net/boards/general-basset-hound-discussion/13740-doggie-leg-braces.html

http://www.basset.net/boards/general-basset-hound-discussion/12297-question-about-my-bassets-legs-feet-2.html

Knuckling over in basset hounds
Standard Disqualifications | Basset Hound Club of Southern California | BHCSC
 

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It doesn't appear to be knuckling over, as in the bend being fore and aft. Looks more to be angled out to the side. Up and down is relatively straight.

And looking at our 8 year old, Dee Dee's, front hocks, they both are angled out, like Baileys right one. She has a very full chest, nestled comfortably between her front legs. So maybe it's Bailey's "normal" looking, straight left leg with the "deformity". :p
 

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I revisited this thread as I saw it had moved up the list. Just to say, leaving aside the crook situation, knuckling over is more likely to happen if the shoulder assembly is TOO FAR FORWARD, putting too much weight on that knuckle joint. If the shoulders are back where they should be, there should be no knuckling over.

And again the Breed Standard, wherever in the world you are, does NOT call for a degree of elbow dysplasia. The front should curve around the chest meaning there will be a SMALL degree of turning out of the front legs. This is not elbow dysplasia.
 

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" The front should curve around the chest meaning there will be a SMALL degree of turning out of the front legs. This is not elbow dysplasia. a SMALL degree of turning out of the front legs. This is not elbow dysplasia. "

and just how does this happen? The crook in the foreleg is the result of Uneven length between the radius and ulna this is know as Elbow incongruity, which is one of several disease/bone adnormalities know as elbow dysplasia. A small amount of incongruity is helpful and required a large amount can be a problem but most often is not as well. That said because it is a problem at a young age it is much amore likely to be a problem as the dog ages.


as for knuckling as the leg turns out more that is going to change the plane of the knuckling, knuckling is caused by lacticity of the Carpal tendons not shoulder placement,

See attached photo . Pay particular attention to area in circle, note how dog on left it appears the wrist joint is forward of the turned out foot. If it were an ankle it that the dog is beginning to roll it. Note on the dog on the right this is not the case even though the feet are turned out even more, This lacticity in the carpal area that allows the foot to be rolled over IMHO is a bigger issue than the turn out,. Often these two things accompany one another but not always,
 

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I really don't want, or need to get into all this again. Suffice to say I do not believe, and can't, that any Basset Breed Standard actually calls for elbow dysplasia. If this was the case, our poor Bassets would be condemned to a later life of pain because 'dysplasia' often means arthritis eventually. What I'm seeing in the examples shown on this website, is far from how a correct Basset front should be. And yes, to a large extent with dwarfism might lead to this form of severe abnormality. But again, NO Breed Standard for the Breed calls for that.

And if you think about it properly, if the shoulder placement is correct there should be no strain on the area that could produce knuckling over.

I've often wondered why, given such a similar construction in fronts, there isn't more of this going on in Dachshunds. Perhaps it's because they aren't so heavy!!
 
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