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We recently adopted a 4 year old female basset whom was recently spayed. She is a great dog and has given us very little trouble with the exception of one thing...

When visiting others homes (with other dogs) she has had instances where she will urinate in the home we are visiting (territory marking?). She does not do this at home.

For background, she came to us from foster care, prior to which she was in a shelter. She has been moved around a bit so I don't know if it could also be a bit of insecurity? How to fix this embarrassing problem?
 

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where she will urinate in the home we are visiting (territory marking?).
possible but not likely keep in mind scent marking has actual little to do with claiming territory, Scent marking involves very little urine if ther is a puddle of any size it is not scent marking

here is an example of why scent marking in homes with outrher dog could be occuing especial if the other dogs are about
Scent Marking in Dogs pART ii
NOTE: TALKING ABOUT DOGS ENTERING A DOG PARK
Here’s the part I find most interesting: Entering dogs, as we all would predict, were often swamped by ‘residents’ doing AG investigation. We all know that this is a potentially tense situation for the entering dog…i.e, everyone wants to know everything about you, but they have to get their nose under your tail to find it out. Anneke found a strong tendency for dogs who were subjected to AG investigation to trot a few feet away and urinate. The residents would then sniff the urine (rather than the dog) and the close contact would terminate. Dr. Lisberg has speculated that urine marking is a good way for dogs to convey social information to other dogs while breaking off the tension involved in the close body contact involved in AG investigation between strangers. Sort of chemical Facebook page that prevents too much intimacy too soon
The think you must realize about dog and how they lear is very different than humans. Once humans lear something the try and find as many other way to apply what they learned. That is they generalize the behavior to other situations as well. Dog on the other hand look to what makes the situation unique why it is different than others they are poor generalizer and excellent discriminatiors. It is never a good idea to assume that a dog that is house traine in your house is also housetrained in any other because it is unlikely the case unless the dog has 100 or thousands of experience of not going indoor in other locations.
Generalization and Discrimination: Fraternal Twins

the Sit Test
Even minor changes in routine can produce dramatic decreases in reliability. For example, it is easy to demonstrate that an OTCh dog doesn't really know what "Sit" means. Dogs are extremely fine discriminators. If the dog has been taught to "Sit" for supper in the kitchen, or to heel-sit and front and finish in obedience class, that's precisely what the dog learns -- to sit in the kichen and in class. The same dog may occasionally not sit in the obedience ring, while playing in the park, or while greeting visitors at the front door. The dog must be trained in an infinite number of situations for it to generalise the "Sit" command to all instances. (This is in marked contrast to people, many of whom will generalise at the drop of a hat - sometimes from a single experience).
 
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