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Hi all. I am due to pick up my Basset boy at the end of this month. We currently have an 8 year old Boston Terrier who will be new bassets pal when he comes home.

I work from home and so am around a lot for pup.

Are there any tips and tricks or things I need to know to help my Basset to settle in nicely?


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Basset Pups are natoriously hard to house train. IMHO it is because compared to other breeds they take much longer to gain necessary sphincter control than other breeds so it is not a matter of willful disregard but simply the inability to hold it so you need to be much more diligent in managing the puppy to get them outside before accidents occur. Never seen a basset that was what I would called house trained before six months of age. Keeping in mind a lack of accidents is not a measure of housetraining but a measure of management control necessary to actual housetrain. See http://www.clickersolutions.com/articles/2001/housetrain.htm

"He should not wear a collar when he is inside, as he may get tangled in it and injure himself. I have seen puppies get their lower jaw hooked on a collar, or foot stuck through a collar. It is too great a risk.

Do not rely on a puppy to tell you when it's time to go out. That is expecting too much responsibility and communication at too early an age. It is up to you, the adult human, to know when he needs to go out. Watch his activity level and the clock.

A 12 wk puppy who is busy playing may need to urinate every 15-20 minutes, whereas a resting puppy might go for an hour, and a sleeping puppy can go 8 hours at night. Activity makes urine! Activity makes urine! Repeat this 10 times, slowly. This is a very important lesson for new puppy owners."

for basset puppies cut the time in 1/2

"The behavior behind this training: Dogs develop substrate preferences for eliminating. By substrate, I mean what they feel under their feet. In their first few weeks of life they need their mother to lick them to stimulate elimination. Around 4 weeks of age they begin to control this themselves. It is a self-rewarding behavior because it feels good. They associate this good feeling with the environment they are in at the time. This is about the same time they are walking well enough to go outside. If they are taken outside enough, several times a day, during this period of development (4 through 8 weeks) they will associate the good feeling of relieving themselves with the grass under their feet, the sky above, and all the smells and sounds of the outdoors. The tactile experience, the texture under the feet, becomes the cue.

If your puppy does not already have this outdoor experience, then you can provide it for him now, to retrain the "substrate preference" he has already learned. Take the pup out about once per hour. This is after play, eating, sleeping, etc. If the puppy can't hold his urine from the crate to the back door while walking, carry him for the first week or so. After a busy play session, take the puppy out, even if it's only been 15 minutes since he last went out. Physical activity produces urine. Inactivity slows the production of urine. This is why a puppy can sleep all night without wetting in the crate, but will urinate on the floor as soon as you let him out of the crate."

This is why management is so important. If they develop a sustratate preference for say carpet inside. it is now going to take more than twice as long to housetrain because the must unlearn this preference in addition to learning a new one. "

Putting the dog on a schedule for food water sleeping and play. will make when the need to go much more predictable and therefore easier to manage and avoid accident.

Franksmom is from UK and can offer UK specific advice if such a thing exists.
 

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don't know how old the puppy is but something to keep in mind as it reaches 16-24 weeks of age.

http://labrescueblog.blogspot.com/2010/02/puppy-license-and-its-loss.html

"uppies up to 4 ½ to 5 months of age appear to have something called a ‘puppy license’ – something that allows them to be an absolute pest to older dogs without repercussion. You see puppies being down right rude in dog terms doing things like jumping on older dogs, stealing food and toys from adults, barking right in the face of an adult or worse still humping them – and the adults just seem to put up with it, and even expect it – at least well socialised dogs do (dogs with good dog communication and social skills).

However at about this age the license expires as the puppies hormone levels change and they develop psychologically. Adult dogs now start to insist on the puppy controlling their behaviour and being more respectful in their interactions – and this comes as a shock to many puppies who ignore the more subtle signs until an adult dog (maybe their best pal at home, a friend at the park or a total stranger) snaps back – figuratively and sometimes literally. The adult dogs might:

· Bark (roar) at an adolescent displaying inappropriate behaviour.

· Plant the adolescent’s face into the dirt with a well placed paw (something my boy was doing to other younger and over the top puppies at only 12 weeks of age – and which caused some distress until I figured out what was going on).

· Knock the adolescent with their muzzle or mouth."

https://rufflyspeaking.wordpress.com/2009/03/04/puppy-license-and-adult-behavior-stop-separating-play/ "My general rule when the dogs are sane is that if blood isn’t flowing, I don’t interfere. This is because of the following great truth:

When we interfere, we screw up a lot more dog interaction than we ever fix.

Humans are REALLY bad at reading what’s happening with dogs. We ignore really bad stuff and we stop, even punish, perfectly normal behavior. This is true even when you’re really experienced; I have spent thousands of hours studying this stuff and I am more convinced that I am an idiot when it comes to dog behavior than I was when I began. Maybe when I’m sixty I’ll start interfering, but right now I know perfectly well how dumb I am.

One of the reasons we screw up interactions has to do with the fact that, just like we humans do, dogs have communications that have beginnings, middles, and ends. The beginning is the series of behaviors that initiate the interaction, the middle is the interaction itself, and the end is when the dogs resolve or end the interaction and move back away from each other.

That entire cycle is VERY important. If it is not completed, the next time the dog or dogs tries to interact the “transaction” won’t go as smoothly. Some of the social lubrication will have been lost."
 

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Bassets are highly social and therefore prone to a behavioral issue known as Separation Anxiety, This is especial true with stay at home owners that a bit to much doting on the puppy. It is important to practice alone time with the puppy early on for short periods of time. If left to there own devices a basset will follow every where you go,

https://www.sfspca.org/sites/default/files/dog_behavior_separation-related-problems.pdf

"What You Can Do
Prevention is the best way to head off separation-related problems, and it’s a must for puppies, young dogs, and newly adopted dogs. Again, dogs have to learn to handle being alone.

Here are some guidelines:
Arrange many brief absences. Puppies and newly adopted dogs are at higher risk of
developing separation-related problems if they are smothered with attention their first few days home. It is much better to leave for brief periods (from a few seconds to a few minutes) extremely often so the dog’s early learning about your departures is that they are no big deal and predict easy, tolerable absences: “Whenever she leaves, she comes back.”

Break up the day. A normal workday for us is an eternity for a dog. If everyone in your home works full time out of the house, consider hiring a dog walker or enrolling your dog in a doggie daycare. This breaks up your dog’s day and leaves him nice and tired when he gets back.

Exercise mind and body. Give your dog both physical and mental exercise. Not only does
problem solving increase confidence and independence, it is mentally tiring and therefore increases the likelihood your dog will rest quietly when left alone. Teach him to play hide-and seek with his toys, teach him tricks, get him involved in a sport like flyball or agility, let him play with other dogs, feed him all his meals in KONG® toys or other food-dispensing toys, or teach him how to play fetch and tug. The more activities and toys are incorporated into his life, the less he will depend on human social contact as sole stimulation."
 
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