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My new 5 1/2 month old Basset "Annie" is in heat at such a young age...it's been 11 days now...when will it end...? how long will it last???...I have to have her on the leach 24/7 ...I've had dogs all my life but they were pretty much all males so I'm not used to this :huh: she used to be a little angel and now seems her whole character changed from being house trained to now peeing on my daughters bed...here is a pic of the little devil..we were waken up at 1:30 in the morning from stray dogs roaming the yard..sorry to vent but just anxious to get it over with...oh forgot to ask..how will I know her heat is finished ? by counting days or ???
 

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My new 5 1/2 month old Basset "Annie" is in heat at such a young age[/b]
Um no while not the average it is not that far removed and quite common,



...it's been 11 days now...when will it end...? how long will it last???...[/b]
Imedately if you have her spayed. Yes it can be done when she is in heat.
If natures runs it course typically 3 weeks but basset are often atypical Also false pregnancy and other commplications can be fairly common as well.
 

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It usually lasts about 3 weeks. Peeing on the be seems to be quite common when they are in heat (at least in this breed). And yes, many experience hormonal temperament changes.
 

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Yikes!! Yes, Soundtrack and Toughy know what they are talking about.

I had the same thing happen to Hazley, first heat before 6 months. Be aware she may go into heat again, faster than you think! Hazley went into heat again at ~9 months, which is when she was spayed. We didn't get her in before the first heat, because I was recovering from ACL surgery. The second time, was entirely my fault. I'm still kicking myself. Apparently the chances of mammary cancers are dramatically lower the earlier they are spayed ( the fewer heat cycles they experience.)

Get thee to the vet! And good luck, she's a cutie!!
 

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Apparently the chances of mammary cancers are dramatically lower the earlier they are spayed ( the fewer heat cycles they experience.)

Ge[/b]

FWIW the mammary cancer rate is dramatically less in bitches that never went into season vs those that experienced 1 orheat cycles, The difference in cancer rate between those that experience 1 heat cycle vs 2 or more while less is still significant. Those that expeirece two or more cycles there is a dramatic decrease in cancer rates.

Canine Spay
A female dog spayed before her first heat will have a near zero chance of developing mammary cancer. After the first heat, this incidence climbs to 7% and after the second heat the risk is 25% (one in four!). It is easy to see that an early spay can completely prevent what is frequently a very difficult and potentially fatal form of cancer.[/b]
Mammary Cancer
The development of benign mammary tumors, not malignant tumors, has been linked to the female reproductive hormone, progesterone. Despite this, however, spaying a female prior to 2-1/2 years significantly decreases risk for both benign and malignant mammary tumors. Spaying after this time reduces risk for benign tumors but appears to have no advantage for prevention of malignant tumors. These results would indicate that hormones do not have a direct mutagenic effect on mammary cells. Rather, it is believed that hormones, through their promotion of cellular growth, increase the number of cells that may be susceptible to malignant transformation. This is consistent with the finding that benign growths are susceptible to becoming malignant. Early spaying may therefore, reduce occurrence of malignant lesions because the procedure removes the source of the hormones that cause some mammary cells to lose growth control, which puts these dividing cells at high risk for mutation and malignant transformation by environmental carcinogens.In fact, recent reports have identified activation of a specific oncogene in a number of canine mammary tumors. Interestingly, pregnancy and
lactation appear to have no influence on mammary cancer risk, however, evidence suggests that females bred extensively beginning at an early age have a slightly lower risk for mammary cancer.

Approximately 50% of malignant mammary tumors in the dog have receptors for either estrogen or progesterone. This means that the presence of these female hormones promotes the growth of these tumors. Benign tumors also have female hormone receptors and can also be stimulated by hormonal cycling of the female dog. This means that spaying is important even if a tumor has already developed; in one study, female dogs spayed at the time of mammary tumor removal or two years prior lived 45% longer than those who remained unspayed

Risk Factors

There are few cancers that are as easily prevented as mammary cancer in dogs. The risk of breast cancer is almost eliminated in dogs that are spayed before their first heat. The risk of malignant mammary tumors in dogs spayed after their first heat increases significantly, but if an owner waits to spay their dog until after their second heat, the risk increases to 25%[/b]
 

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Discussion Starter #6
My new 5 1/2 month old Basset "Annie" is in heat at such a young age...it's been 11 days now...when will it end...?[/b]

to keep you updated...my Annie is NOW going through a false pregnancy...I thought it was loose skin when a friend touched her teets and milk skirted out...I've contacted my vet and says nothing much can be done but to keep an eye on her if any hard lumps dont go down to bring her in for antibiotics...
Anybody elses basset go through this :huh: I do plan on having her spayed but will she do this at every heat?
 

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to keep you updated...my Annie is NOW going through a false pregnancy...I thought it was loose skin when a friend touched her teets and milk skirted out...I've contacted my vet and says nothing much can be done but to keep an eye on her if any hard lumps dont go down to bring her in for antibiotics...
Anybody elses basset go through this :huh: I do plan on having her spayed but will she do this at every heat?[/b]

false pregnancy is not in uncommon in all breeds of dog I don't think bassets are any more prone then the general population. You have to watch out for Pyometra But it is usually occur in middle age and older bitches.
 

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My girls seem to nearly always have false pregnancies, to some degree.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I am anxiously waiting for her teets to get back to normal so I can have her spayed :mellow:
 
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