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Discussion Starter #1
Hey this is my first post!
My husband and I have a female basset hound that is a year and a half. I will let her outside to use the bathroom when I get home from work, but when my husband gets home from work she's excited and cant get to him fast enough to greet him. She wants her belly to be rubbed and will just loose control of her bladder and pee sometimes a big puddle. Its becoming such an issue that we cant let her on the furniture without her peeing. We love all over her and just cant figure out why she's doing this. She doesn't pee when I go to rub her belly, so is this a dominance issue?
 

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no excitement urination sort of on the lines of peeing when you cough or laugh. general as they get older they grow out of it but not always. That said peeing like this can be a submissive gesture as well. When was she spayed? Spay incontinence may be playing a role and a medication like "Proin" might help talk to your vet.


 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hey this is my first post!
My husband and I have a female basset hound that is a year and a half. I will let her outside to use the bathroom when I get home from work, but when my husband gets home from work she's excited and cant get to him fast enough to greet him. She wants her belly to be rubbed and will just loose control of her bladder and pee sometimes a big puddle. Its becoming such an issue that we cant let her on the furniture without her peeing. We love all over her and just cant figure out why she's doing this. She doesn't pee when I go to rub her belly, so is this a dominance issue?
no excitement urination sort of on the lines of peeing when you cough or laugh. general as they get older they grow out of it but not always. That said peeing like this can be a submissive gesture as well. When was she spayed? Spay incontinence may be playing a role and a medication like "Proin" might help talk to your vet.


We have not had her spayed yet. We were thinking about her having one litter of puppies
 

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I’m sorry to hear this . I would check for uti first

unfortunately I just gave back a puppy at 14 weeks because of this . We couldn’t even bend down to touch him or put him on my bed to cuddle without peeing . I spoke with my vet who said it’s submissive peeing and most don’t outgrow it

wanted a Bassett my whole life but this made puppy training near impossible
 

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I will talk to our vet about it, thank you for your response! We love her and she really is the best dog besides the peeing issue
 

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spoke with my vet who said it’s submissive peeing and most don’t outgrow it"
It is stupid crap like this, which is why you don't rely on vets for behavioral issues unless they have specific training which 99.99% do not. Submissive urination is fairly common in puppies and in most case they grow out of it. and if not it is correctable with behavior modification. The procedure for this is outlined in the links I previously posted.

Treatment
Puppies can outgrow submission urination with a little patience from their owners. If not, veterinarians will first ensure that there’s no medical reason for the behavior and only then begin to suggest ways to address the problem. Here are a few steps veterinarians may offer their clients to help alter the behavior.
Identify the triggers to this behavior. Find the actions that elicit submissive urination in your dog and alter the circumstances. If your dog urinates when you greet him or her at the end of a workday, ignore your dog for a few minutes as soon as you get home. This will help your dog stay calm when you arrive, and you can greet your dog calmly when he or she approaches you.

Avoid punishment. When your dog urinates submissively, do not punish him or her or express frustration. Either ignore the behavior and walk away or calmly take your dog outside and reward him or her for urinating outdoors.
Avoid aggressive or dominant gestures. Speak calmly to your dog, avoid direct eye contact, kneel at your dog’s level rather than leaning over from the waist, and pet your dog under the chin rather than on top of the head. It can also help to approach your dog from the side rather than head on.

Reward confident behavior. Provide your dog with alternatives to submissive behavior and reward his or her efforts. For example, if your dog normally cowers when you arrive, ask your dog to sit, and then reward him or her with a treat. Keep rewarding good behavior throughout the day to build your dog’s confidence.
Prevention
The key is to build a dog’s confidence with positive reinforcement and avoid all punishment. Scolding or punishing a submissive dog only worsens the problem by eliciting more submissive behavior.{/quote]
 
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