Basset Hounds Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Basset Hound Mix that is 6 months old. I also have a Maltipoo who is 14 human years old. The two do not get along. My 5 pound Maltipoo, Brooke, keeps trying to get control over my 6 month, 45 pound, Marley. Marley keeps on trying to sit on or lay on Brooke. I have tried numerous things but nothing has worked. Now, Marley has chosen to eat Brooke's poop not her own mind you....just Brooke's poop. I have tried meat tenderizer, pumpkin and now something called Forbid which the vet gave me. Nothing is working. I am thinking it is more like a dominance type thing???? Any thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,847 Posts
I. Poop eating is normal dog behavior and yes dogs are more likely to eat other dogs poop than there own. Nothing added to the diet stops the behavior, Okay, So Some Dogs Eat Poop

2.
My 5 pound Maltipoo, Brooke, keeps trying to get control over my 6 month, 45 pound, Marley
this is also normal dog behavior especial if marley is not spayed or neutered The Puppy License and its loss "
Puppies up to 4 ½ to 5 months of age appear to have something called a ‘puppy license’ – something that allows them to be an absolute pest to older dogs without repercussion. You see puppies being down right rude in dog terms doing things like jumping on older dogs, stealing food and toys from adults, barking right in the face of an adult or worse still humping them – and the adults just seem to put up with it, and even expect it – at least well socialised dogs do (dogs with good dog communication and social skills).

However at about this age the license expires as the puppies hormone levels change and they develop psychologically. Adult dogs now start to insist on the puppy controlling their behaviour and being more respectful in their interactions – and this comes as a shock to many puppies who ignore the more subtle signs until an adult dog (maybe their best pal at home, a friend at the park or a total stranger) snaps back – figuratively and sometimes literally. The adult dogs might:

· Bark (roar) at an adolescent displaying inappropriate behaviour.

· Plant the adolescent’s face into the dirt with a well placed paw (something my boy was doing to other younger and over the top puppies at only 12 weeks of age – and which caused some distress until I figured out what was going on).

· Knock the adolescent with their muzzle or mouth.

· Snap at them.

The messages might be relatively peaceful and quick or they might appear and sound like a major scuffle if not full out fight – and the adolescent will generally be doing the majority of the screaming. But if there are no wounds then do not panic – now or the next time you see or meet this adult dog or any adult dog, or your adolescent will pick up this fear from you and act on it. This does not mean that you should put up with inappropriately socialised/skilled adult dogs or other adolescents bullying and picking on or terrifying your pup – so if you are concerned, if blood is drawn or punctures made then seek professional help.

Adults will also tend to self-handicap themselves less and instead play with more of their cunning, strength and brute power – now they might knock the adolescent over, pin them or stand over them. Any of these can cause the adolescent to scream or run from the scene giving high pitched yelps that cause us humans concern and often end in sanctions for the adult so that the conversation between adolescent and adult dog is not completed but rather interrupted by us with the adolescent getting off lightly – and sadly not learning the lesson as quickly as they would have if these interactions were monitored but only intervened in when either dog is in likely physical danger. The adult dog is also more likely to then try to get in and teach this cocky adolescent a lesson more quickly next time, therefore escalating the situation needlessly. If the adult dog gets the blame and is therefore removed from the dog park, class or home needlessly, removing a well socialised dog with clear communication skills from the social group and therefore reducing the number of well socialised dogs that other puppies, adolescents and dogs are likely to come across and learn from.

It is critical that the adolescent dog gains experience with adult dogs and learns to control himself, communicate clearly and interact in a socially acceptable way. Without this experience the pup grows to become an under-socialised dog – one that is likely to attract or cause altercations in the playground (park, footpath or any where else they meet or come within sight of another dog). "
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for your advice. All the yelping is coming from my older dog because Marley is so much bigger and the older one ends up underneath the younger one. I am going to start taking her to a socialization behavior class to see if it helps.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top