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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
We've been looking for a friend for our 22-month-old Basset Hound for months. We wanted an adult rescue, but we never found a good fit. My heart has been with corgis since we lost our last one, so we recently purchased a corgi pup. Our Basset LOVES him, but she's very pushy, to the point of getting on the puppy's nerves. She'll push him over, nibble on him, and cut him off when he's running. She pins him down and engulfs his neck with her mouth. She doesn't bite, though, and we separate them when she does this. The puppy is very sweet, but he responds with going after her and biting her ears and her skin. If Basset doesn't bully, they play wonderfully together. I've read they need to work this out themselves, and I've also read we should separate them. The puppy is nine weeks old and will be heading into the strong biting phase. I'm concerned it's going to get a lot worse. What should I do?
 

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We've been looking for a friend for our 22-month-old Basset Hound for months. We wanted an adult rescue, but we never found a good fit. My heart has been with corgis since we lost our last one, so we recently purchased a corgi pup. Our Basset LOVES him, but she's very pushy, to the point of getting on the puppy's nerves. She'll push him over, nibble on him, and cut him off when he's running. She pins him down and engulfs his neck with her mouth. She doesn't bite, though, and we separate them when she does this. The puppy is very sweet, but he responds with going after her and biting her ears and her skin. If Basset doesn't bully, they play wonderfully together. I've read they need to work this out themselves, and I've also read we should separate them. The puppy is nine weeks old and will be heading into the strong biting phase. I'm concerned it's going to get a lot worse. What should I do?

Without seeing exactly what's going on, this is going to be fine balance between letting them sort themselves out (and bitches normally rule) and it deteriorating to the point one of them, or both, is injured and ends up with the vet. Corgis are a herding breed and the instinct to do that, nipping the back of the legs of cattle, is strong. If this continues, I'd be stepping in so the puppy at least, starts to learn who is the boss in your house. If he gets silly excited, yes, call a time out - and using a crate is a valuable aid although should never be used as a place of punishment.


Both have to learn how to work with each other but to be honest, she's probably doing this to protect herself (puppy teeth are sharp). I'd always correct the puppy. Once she sees you reacting to perhaps his unwanted behaviour, things should calm down.


Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you, that's very helpful. Here's just a hint of the bullying from Ellie. Corgi wants to explore, but Ellie won't let him and it started to turn into a thing. Not high quality videos, just taking some for my mom who's housebound and wants to see the puppy and Ellie.
 

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Hum. To me she's being a bit rough - getting a bit carried away. Given how small that puppy is and if she were mine, I think I'd stop her from chasing the puppy when he sets off to explore. Just my opinion but given her weight, she could so easily cause injury.


His facial colour does intrigue me - never seen a Corgi with those markings.
 

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Ok, that's what my gut was telling me.
The corgi has a mismark. Too much white on his face to show, so no one on the breeder's long waitlist wanted him. We think it just makes him more interesting. ; )
 

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According to my experience, I suggest you should introduce them to get along well by positive reinforcement. Reward good behaviors and ignore unwanted behaviors.
What's more, it's important to treat each one fairly and not scold your older basset because most adult dogs will show dominance to a new doggie visitor. A blamed dog would feel down and get more aggressive to the weak dog.
1. Going to a dog-friendly place (like a park and beach) can distract their attention and allow them to acclimate each other. Remember to leash them before going outside. Make sure they do well on a leash without pulling. Two ill-trained and unfriendly dogs pose a huge threat to you.
2. Feeding them with different bowls and using different dog beds allow them to have their private space.
3. Obedience training your older dog might help you control his behaviors and have a great influence on training the little corgi.
 
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