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My two girls bark more than any other bassets that we have had! They are also kind of aggressive toward people who have dogs or say they love dogs. This is strange because they will cuddle and be very lovey to those who do not like dogs. I don't get it! Any suggestions how to deal with this would be great!
 

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This is strange because they will cuddle and be very lovey to those who do not like dogs. I don't get it!
very easy to explain People that do not like dog try to avoid eye contact. do not move toward the dog etc the act in a very non threatening manor. People that love dog come up to the hug them etc. Hugging a dog , approaching a dog straight on,. making direct eye contact are all threatening gestures. This happens all the time.


They act kind of aggressive? My guess is that they don't act aggressive at all it, rather it is just a misinterpretation on your part what is going on. See the following three articles

He Just Wants To Say "Hi!"
Aggression or appropriate response to rudeness? Far too many dogs suffer because handlers & trainers don't know the difference between the two.


hugging your dog


Dogs Use Non-Aggressive Fighting to Resolve Conflicts
Perhaps a more useful term to describe growling at a potential bone thief or the interaction between Denny and Meadow is “agonistic behavior.” Ethologists, who often use this term when studying nonhuman animals, define agonistic behaviors as those that occur between individuals of a particular species in conf lict situations. Examples of agonistic behaviors in dogs include threats like muzzle-puckering and growling; submissive behaviors like crouching, lowering the head and tucking the tail; offensive behaviors like lunging and snapping; defensive behaviors like retracting the commissure (lips) while showing the teeth; and attacking behaviors like biting. With the exception of biting that results in punctures or tears, none of these behaviors necessarily indicates intent to do harm. They simply reveal emotion (e.g., anger or fear), communicate intention (e.g., to maintain control of a resource or to avoid an interaction) or function as a normal part of play fighting (e.g., growling, snapping or inhibited biting). To determine if an interaction meets the criteria for “agonistic behavior,” an observer must focus on an objective description of the communicative patterns displayed rather than automatically jumping to judgments associated with the use of the term “aggression.”

It is my experience that females tend to bark more than males and there is a great disparity between individual dog in how much they bark. That said without any explaintion of when, under what situations you believer the dog are barking excessively there is know way to help you with that.
 
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