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Discussion Starter #1
Last night Penny the Staffie got real nasty and started growling at Buddy and ended up biting his ear. It wasn't until about a half an hour later that I saw she actually drew blood. I didn't see any behavior in either of them that could have triggered this. Last night they slept for a while on the same bed and today everything is just fine. I've cut back on Penny's food and was wondering if this is making her a little cranky. Or maybe this is just a dominance thing. We've had her for a year now and she can be a bit bossy with the boys; however there have never been any major issues. Has anyone been through this?
 

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Isn't Buddy an older guy?He's probably no match for her as far as defending himself- I don't think I'd trust her alone with him from now on for fear she'd hurt him badly- :( .
 

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Yogi, who's much older than his beloved little puppy-girl (~11 years vs. ~11-12 months), will growl and even feign snapping when his little puppy doesn't mind his manners - ie, if she tries to sit on his head while he's napping (I've seen it with my own eyes :blink: ) or the like.

I can see that Yogi could miss and accidentally actually bite his puppy because it sounds so ferocious. But that's never happened and, in general, it just seems to be a case of an oldster reprimanding a youngster.

Is it possibly Penny didn't mean to bite and was only reprimanding, but missed?

If not, is it possible Penny doesn't feel well? If she's older, could she be cranky from arthritis or something?
 

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Well, we may not know the 'why' of the act of agression,which had physical impacts, but we do know it happened and I concur to not leave them alone together if at all possible.
don
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Noonie is our older guy at 11, Buddy is 7. Penny is 4 and a bossy little girl. When we first brought her home there was some growling/snapping with her and the boys as they were becoming acquainted. It really didn't take too long before everyone was happily living together. Life with the pack has been fairly uneventful until the other night. It all happened so fast, maybe she didn't mean to do it. I still can't help wondering if cutting back on her food has anything to do with her change of mood. Here lately she's been running the others off when I'm in the kitchen cooking. A trip to the vet may be in order. And of course they will be monitored.
 

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You might consider adding filler to Penny's food, like green beans or canned pumpkin. The addition would help her to feel fuller and less hungry, but not add many extra calories.

Agree with the suggestions for monitoring.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the suggestion Betsy. She's been snacking on raw carrots, but I'm sure a filler like pumpkin would be a good idea.
 

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A trip to the vet may be in order.[/b]
Ehile not the most likely It is alway best to rule out a medical causes. For instance Hypothyrodism would acount for both a weight gain and moodness/aggression

Is your dog hypothyroid?

Hypothyroidism and Dogs
This decreased cell function causes a number of physical changes in a hypothyroid dog. Nearly half of such dogs gain weight (with no change in diet). Over a third become lethargic and mentally dull, and just under a third show hair or skin abnormalities.

...Some veterinarians also suspect a link between behavior problems and hypothyroidism. Increased aggression is the most commonly suspected behavior change, but some veterinarians speculate that a few hypothyroid dogs may develop anxiety- related or compulsive behaviors. If your pet develops a sudden behavioral change, have your dogs thyroid status examined.[/url]
 
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