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I got a basset hound because when I did research..most books/websites said they were lazy slugs and were good for small homes and it would be hard to get them going. But my Basset is completely the opposite!
She is a year and a couple of months old. She chews. She jumps on counters and steals food. She is very distructive. She leaps on people (ignoring doesn't work...niether does kneeing her) and springboards off furniture. It's a nightmare.
And now she has started Peeing on my bed. So we banned her from the bed and have her sleeping in a crate (which she spends 8 - 3 during the day in too while we are at work...because she can't be trusted in the house). But she was dashing into the room and peeing on the bed anyway. So we are keeping the door shut. BUT last night as we led her into the room to go in the crate she lept on the bed and Peed AGAIN before we could catch her.
This is getting ridiculous.
I personally would ban her from the room altogeather. But my fiance thinks that is no better than having her in an outdoor kennel and won't hear of it.
I put her through obediance class...our teacher was worthless and told us not to expect too much since it was a basset. And it's true that getting her attention to listen to me is very difficult. Treats don't work. Yelling doesn't work. Squirt bottles don't work. Clicker training didn't work.

So here are the steps I am taking....
We are taking her to the vet this weekend to check for a UTI.
We have checked out a different obedience class for "troubled" dogs.
We even emailed a dog behaviorist to see if that might help.
We are also researching Doggie Day Care to burn some energy maybe since she can't be outside during the day. It's outragiously expensive around here though...so we could probably only afford 2 to 3 days a week.

What else do I need to do? What works for these dogs? Why is she not a slug like everyone said she would be?

Here she is with one of the cats. She is great with other dogs and cats. She is very sweet...just crazy. It's like someone put a bordercollie in my basset's body! Oh and nevermind the ugly couch...she ate it so it's gone. We replaced it with a hopefully harder to distroy leather couch.
 

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That's a sweet picture. Please don't kill her.

Anyway... my basset is the same way only without the pee'ing. She's a little pistol, totally opposite from what I expected. You have to be stern with her, train her and when she pee's, take her outside and say "potty" (this worked for me). Don't rub her nose in the pee in the house, she doesn't understand and doesn't like that (not saying you do that to her, but would you like someone to rub your nose in pee?).

I'm sure other, more "seasoned" basset owners can give you better advice than me. My girl is only 3 so I don't have a lot of years behind me when it comes to bassets.
 

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Bassets are hunting dogs at heart. Let me repeat: bassets are hunting dogs at heart.

Bassets were bred to be independent thinkers and led by their noses. They're also athletic creatures, despite the extremely misleading stereotypes about them on various commercials, etc.

They're also very smart and pretty easily bored.

They need exercise. They're not going to be content being locked up in a house for 8-10 hours a day unless they're also getting some kind of vigorous activity for a goodly length of time every day.

They're stubborn because they were bred to be stubborn and because they're independent minded.

And, yes, they can jump. I once watched in astonishment when Biscuit sized up the height of a rock retaining wall that was about 4-4 1/2 feet tall, then took off running, cleared the top of the retaining wall and went on a 1-2 hour jog about town. How do I know it was a 1-2 hour jog? Because I immediately took out after him---it took me 1-2 hours to find him and he was still running when I finally did, just happy as he could be.

If you decide you can't handle the reality of the basset, please contact a local rescue as soon as possible.
 

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I put her through obediance class...our teacher was worthless and told us not to expect too much since it was a basset. And it's true that getting her attention to listen to me is very difficult. Treats don't work. Yelling doesn't work. Squirt bottles don't work. Clicker training didn't work.
I agree that teacher was worthless. Every dog can be trained well, you just need to figure out how. It's part of their job to help you figure that out.

Every puppy is high energy. The only difference is what degree of high energy. In the future if you want a "slug" you should consider adopting older dogs that already have their puppy energy out.

Our dogs were both adopted by us at about age 8 and are definitely slugs. But lovable slugs. We wouldn't have it any other way. We are a quiet and lazy household and they fit well.
 

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Oh my she's sure got that, "Look at me, I'm a perfect little angel baby face. Why I haven't done any of those things" look down pat!! Patience & exercise will work. Just before PB was about 6 mos old I wanted to sell her to the gypsies for peeing her own bed. It was every single day so we constantly had a dog bed in the washer! Now if it was my bed... I can't say she'd be really a gypsy dog but I would have way more grey hair!! She just turned four & she did settle down. So go pet her belly, tell her how much you love her, & that if she doesn't stop peeing the bed you will sell her to the gypsies!
 

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Aw don't kill her.

I understand where you are coming from completely. My Penny loves pooping on carpet, she pees when she gets excited or meets new people, has chewed on my couch,, scratched my bathroom door, jumps on people, tries to run off when we go on walks, and doesn't like having to listen in order to get treats. Penny, is, however, a special needs dog. She was abused, abandoned, found, and then had to be rehomed with us after only a year of living with her previous owner. She is terrified of someone holding something bigger than her (brooms, guitar, etc) and tucks her tail whenever someone bends over to pet her instead of kneeling.

She needs a lot of love and attention and I didn't realize that at first.
Your girly needs the same thing.

Firstly, Bassets are not the lazy dogs everyone wants to believe. They like to smell things, they like to explore things, they run pretty fast for having stubby legs, and and have high energy (especially one as young as yours).

Some solutions that I came up with for Penny that might work for you:

-Kong chew toys. They're a gift from God. Put some treats/peanut butter in it and it provides something for them to do.
-Long walks. It tires her out and is good exercise for her.
-Taking her out to potty FREQUENTLY. I try to make sure her bladder is always empty. That way if she does meet someone new (we live in a college apartment so it happens every day) she doesn't pee on them. It also keeps her from peeing on furniture and having accidents while she's home alone.
-Limiting her water intake. Dogs need about an cup of water per 5lbs of their body weight. Take into account how much time she spends outside a day. We also cut off water after 9pm with her.
-Talk to her/be with her. I swear Penny understands human talk (I attribute that to bassets being very smart), but I've come to find most dogs just like your company and want to be acknowledged by the humans they live with. Belly rubs are a wonder.
 

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Housetrain 101

I can not over emphysis the importantace of a schedule that it rigourly adhered and this does not mean when you take the dog out no. It mean when the dog is fed when it has acess to water when it plays and when it sleeps. When you do this the dog is going to be a lot more predictible on when it needs to go so you can prevent accident form happen. Keep in mind the prevention of accident is not the end product but only the first step to housetraining.

see housetraining Pay particular attention to substrate training. Because what has happed is this dog preffers the feel of sheet and something soft under it feet wich could also mean it own dog bed carpet etc as well I have found that dog that soil a human bed tend to do the same thing to their own as well. This can often bee the result of being rated too long for the dog to hold it and the pee the bed. It is a "plesurable experpeirience" the loss of pressure on the bladder etc so it becomes self rewarding it happens a few times and the dog begins to seek theese type of surfaces out to pee on. The problem is once this occurs you must be extra dilligent to prevent it. can the dog go 8-3 without soiling the crate consitently in not you need to make arragment to let her out sooner hiring a pet walker, coming home for lunch. etc. and be dillegent to prevent accidents on such surface because now you must first over come this substrate prefference before teaching a new one will work. The second think is your explaination brings up a couple more points.
1. Why was the dog not taken outside before going to bed where it would have relieved it self

2. When you need to control the dog use a leash it is fine to use a leash in the house Had the dog been leashed it would never had been able to get on the bed in the first place.

3. Fustration is actual good for training in this way. It is a powerfull motivator. If you were not fustrated the motivation to changes the dogs behavior would be far less.

Say yes training reminders
Whenever frustration sets in remind yourself that “YOUR DOG IS A MIRROR IMAGE OF YOUR ABILITIES AS A TRAINER”. Only when you take ownership of your dog’s shortcomings will you be able to turn them into attributes.


 

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What else do I need to do? What works for these dogs? Why is she not a slug like everyone said she would be?
Lets take the last question first because you did not ask people that actual own and know the breed the would have never told you a basset puppy is a slug because that is far from the cas. Even as adults they are not slug the do hoeve adjust better to most to the activity level in the household and active household and the dog will be active a quite household and the dogs will be quite. but this is the breed average or norm, in any population there are individuals that fall outside the norms by choosing a particular breed for the atributes and personality you want and match that breed you have a better of chance of getting those but it is no guarantee.

2 what works for basset works for every other breed as well but you need to know a few thing I high suggest reading Hard to Train?
A look at "difficult-to-train" breeds and the reality of what shapes these canine minds

Basset were not bred to work under the direction of humans like heard and aand sporting breed they are not bidable, willing to please. They are not going to do something because it makes you happy. There need to be the reasonalble expectation on their part that there is something in it for them Fort the typical basset and all dogs for that matter the answer is food. Ya ya I heard ya and I answer that latter.


This dog is basical confined for 16 hours or more a day so when not it is going to need extensisve exercise both physically and mentally the rest of the time. For the mental end you can do some of that while confined in a crate with stuffed kongs or other treat dispensing toys. Give you discription I would think You have limit acess to wide open space that it would be safe to let the dog run or play. So you need an exercise that wourks in a small area. An no walking the dog is not exercise especially at a basset sniff pace. it is mental stimulation for the dog but that is about it. The is really only one game that is going to work for you

Tug of War
Dog owners have been admonished for decades to never play tug of war with their dogs because of the risk of it increasing aggression and/or dominance in the dog. Even many dog resource people such as breeders, trainers and veterinarians caution against this game. This is partly a failure to discriminate between agonistic behavior (conflict resolution & defensive aggression) and predatory behavior. Also, many people have issues about witnessing intensity. Intensity is not aggression, however.
Played with rules, tug-of-war is a tremendous predatory energy burner and good exercise for both dog and owner. It serves as a barometer of the kind of control you have over the dog, most importantly over his jaws. The game doesn't make the dog a predator: he already is one. The game is an outlet. It’s intense, increases dog focus and confidence and plugs into something very deep inside them. The big payoff is in lowered incidence of behavior problems due to understimulation and a potent motivator for snappy obedience.

Not what I highlited in bold but pleas read both articles in this pdf.

http://www.4pawsu.com/tugofwardog.htmTO TUG OR NOT TO TUG:
SERIOUSLY, THAT'S STILL A QUESTION

In 2002, a study was done to determine whether or not playing tug increased the incidence of aggressive or "dominant" behaviors. The researchers concluded that tug games had no negative effects on the relationship between the dog and human.

Ok let end the negativity now, yes you can teach that dog any dog to tug see

How to create a motivational toy



Tug It Training Toy​

Finally there's a training device to teach a dog to tug that makes the process both fun and easy! The Tug It! is made out of nylon/polyester mesh so it automatically delivers food reinforcement as the dog clamps down on it. The harder the dog mouths the toy, the more food reinforcement the dog gets.​

Training tip from Clean run Magazine Feature my dog Macey


If image is too small to read baisicly take string cheese or your dogs favorite treat in a paper back then twist it. When whtn the dog grabs for the back start pulling. Let the dog shred the bag and eat the contents.​
 

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The original instructor *was* useless. Any decent instructor knows not to dismiss a dog's ability to learn based on its breed, good trainers know how to adapt and improvise to the dog they are working with.
She is NOT a troubled dog. She is a normal, high-spirited adolescent desperately in need of more exercise and proper training. I suggest finding an experienced trainer who has a record of success working with "non-obedience" breeds. Any trainer who says not to expect much because she's a basset is to be avoided.

As stated above, this is a hunting breed, meant to go all day. While most do become more sedate (at least in the house) as they mature (particularly if the household is rather sedentary), many do not. My 10 year old Rosie still bounces off the walls (she is not called "Crazy Rosie Roo" for nothing).

For the chewing: she needs to be supervised at all times when loose (just like housebreaking). She *can't* chew things she shouldn't if you are watching her - as soon as she starts, stop her and give her an acceptable chew toy (that she likes).

For the jumping, you need to teach an alternate behavior (sit) which she must perform in order to get the attention she is looking for. Once you have a decent trainer and she understands that "sit" is not optional, you can use that before she starts jumping and give her attention for a behavior you do want.

You may also find "Nothing In Life Is Free" useful for helping to teach her self-control. Google the term and you should come up with good links.

For the peeing on the bed, checking for a UTI is good, another thought is that if she is not spayed yet she may be coming into heat. The leash as suggested is definitely recommended.

As for the counter surfing and stealing food, I'm afraid that it's a lot easier to train yourself not to leave stuff within reach than it is to try to stop them from doing that. Save yourself the aggro, don't leave food out.
 

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And it's true that getting her attention to listen to me is very difficult. Treats don't work. Yelling doesn't work. Squirt bottles don't work. Clicker training didn't work.

BS when talking about techniques in general they all work What is true is you do not know or unwilling to do what it thake to implement them successfully


ignoring doesn't work...niether does kneeing her)
see above it take some knowledge of how and why things work to implement them correctley and that includes limitation

Le us start with the knee to the chest. Can it work Yes howver must petowner are not will to do what it take to have it work. In order for it to work it must "punish" the dog. that is it need to be so strong the dog thinks twice about jumping up again. That is goint to require a lot of pain inflicted on the dog often times crossing in being abusive,. A mild asversive will not work and in this case is actually a reward, A mild bump on the chest is not adversive to the dog it is a reward of human contact it is seeking. This is while the failure rate of this method is astronomical because it requires that you are abusive to the dog.

Ignoring the behavior again work if done correctly always works with in the parameters that a previously rewarded behavior like jumping up is always lurking and can show up randomly on rare ocassions., That said it is not likely to succes because humans can not implement it properly. First once it because all incidence must be ignore. Just a single mistake of petting the dog while it is jumping up or other wise acknowledgeing it is going to make it exponentially hard to end the behavior by extinction alone. Here why. Variable reinforcement is very powerfull. Think of a slot maching it pays of only once and a while the expectation on any one pull is likely it won't payoff but people keep pulling the handle because of varriable reinforcement when you don't expected to be paid every time when you dont get paid it is not a big deal tha is what happen when you occasional reward the jumping behavior even if inadvertently varriablly reinforced behaviors become come very hard to exctiguish via extinction The second thing that no one tells you abaut using extinction is something that is called an extinction burst that happens virtually every time using extinction on a behavior that has been previously reinforced. Think of the elevator you step in and every time you press your floor button you are rewarded with the elivator doors closing and it taking you to the desire floor. So one day you press the button and nothing happens what do you do. Take the stairs, that is what those that tell you ignore the behavior would leave you to believe but that is not what happens., You hit the button again and again, try a different button, press harder, faster slower, longer etc before giving up that is an extinction burst the behavior gets worse much worse before it stops. Now considering the ignore the behavior is always recommend with attention seeking behaviors you get a behavior that occurs because it was so obnoxious it could not be ignore getting much much worse what art the odd when that happen it can be continued to be ignore so it fails. If that were not bad enough consider this attention seeking behavior exist to fufill a need of the dog ie get attention. even if you successfully ignore a behavior to extinction you have not changed the fundamental reason the behavior occured in the first place get attention., The dog is not simply going to give up on getting attention because jumping up no longer works it is going to try many different things until it find that new behavior that new one that is even more obnoxious than jumping up that you can't ignore and your back in the same hell you started. The way to end these obnoxious behaviors is to teach the dog a more appropriate less abonoxious behavior and reward this more appropriate behavior much more than the previous obnoxious one. This is where ignoreing the old behavior can play a part but it is only a part.

Quick Fix for a Jumping Dog

Squirt bottles yelling no etx people assume are punishment for most dogs they are not Keep in mind here I am using the behaviorism definition of punishment which is reduced the likelihood of a behavior from occuring. At best they are adversive something to be avoid but not even that for a lot of dogs. In a real training contect most often they are best describe as disruptive stimuli in that load nois a spritz of wather is going to cause the dog to stop what its doing and basicaly say to itself what was that. They do have uses in training if done properly. By interupting the undesired behavior you no have the oppurtunity but but the time is brief to now teach the dog a more appropriate behavior and reward it for it. The classic example is the dog chewing on a shoe. Yell no! dog stops for a second take shoe give appropriae doggie chew toy when dog chews on appropriate chew toy reward with praise and pets.

If you expect a squirt bottle or yelling No to discourage inappropriate behavior on their own you will be waiting till hell freezes over but if used properly as disruptive stimuli and coupled with teaching a more appropriate behavior then they can.
 

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food is a basic commonity for a dog it is required to sustain life and therefore can be succesfully used to reward appropriate behaviors. An behaviors that are reward are going to occur more often, Food fails to be a motivator under three senarios than can eaisly be resolve. Let us substitute the human equivilent of food which would be money. Use as some one to jump into a septic tank for a penny you arn't going to find too many takers a million buck changes that sugnificantly so The question is if the dog is not working for food is how rewarding is that particular food to that dog. A piece of kibble is going to have a different value than a piece of steak or a carrot etc You need to use a reward that is appropriate to what you are asking the dog to do.

The scond are you run into problem is if the resource ie food is overabundant. Ask the average person to jump into a septic tank for a millillin buck you willl have a lot of takers ask Bill Gates not so much. Because he has so much money a million bucks hase little value. So if the dog is allowe to free feed and eat as much as it want an extra treat that you have to work for no thank you. control the food bowl.
The third and final is stress. Have a person with a fear of snakes to stick her hand in a bucket of non[venimous snakes for a million buck not as like as a person that has no fear of snake. When basset shut down the tend to stop, stop moving, stop listen just stop hence the image of the stuborn basset is often times simply a stressed out one.
Training with Food

IMHO there is no such thing as a suborn basset there are only stubborn owners that are unwilling to change their ways to get the basset to do what they want the basset to do. Keeping in mind that a basset is not going to do something for you out of the kindness of its heart it is going to do someth you ask because he thinks there is something in it for him.

There is aa common thread with most overrambuction dogs and the problems behaviors they all revolve around a single theme a lack of impulse control and as we confine dogs more in smaller spaces this problem seem to be getting worse see

Lowering Arousal

We used to say a trained dog is a free dog, a dog that could go with us anywhere on or off​
lead. They knew how to “behave” in the human​
-controlled world. But what we should
have said is: A dog with self-control is a free dog. Freedom for dogs has everything to do

with impulse control and little to do with whether they can heel or shake their paw

...
In my experience, a few dogs are born with low arousal levels and they have a natural
sense of self-control. But I find that there seem to be less and less of these dogs. This may​
be because of breeding priorities that don’t include low arousal, or it may just mean that
most dogs don’t live in rural environments and therefore they don’t come with very good​
natural programming to live in a mainly human-controlled world. I think dogs living in a
busy household or environment never learn self control because they are constantly being
stimulated and conditioned to be up and active, particularly ones who might be crated for
long periods of time. When these dogs are then let out of the crate, owners often allow
them to pace and be continually active in the home environment. Dogs like this can lose
their ability to control themselves, similar to what can happen to dogs in a shelter

environment.


As you can see that using excersize and mental stimulation only go so far you ales need to actively teach impulse control With that in mind I Highly suggest starting to more of rone week do the follow take all the kibble that would be normally the dog meals an use it instead for the following exercise. Don't give the dog treats for anything other than pottying in in a approriate place or for going into the crate when you need him too.

it is is in video format so should be easy to follow I would as not push the training to far to fast by the end of the wek the treats should still be in your hand. Also you whan to do this in more than two session It is just the dog has to work of all of it total ration of food this way


after the first week if everything is going ok you can start to work on the more advanced stuff and some other thing as well

like
Protocol for relaxation



http://www.sdhumane.org/site/DocServer/Any_Dog_Can_Live_Calmly_in_a_House.pdf?docID=362
Any Dog Can Live Calmly in a House - Even Yours!


Rewarding Non-Behavior

for a behaviorist acronym translation just substitute treates for +R and ignore behavior/leave/timeout for -P


when the dog is overstimulated and excite it is imposible to train mot because it is dumb or untrainable but simply it does not hear you, you don not exist.
The over stimulated Dog
The limbic side is your emotional self.
The cognitive side is your thinking self.

Emotional reactions originate in the limbic part of the brain, which allows for fast-acting response to events based on quick impressions. Survival depends on quickness of response — allowing you to notice and duck when you catch a glimpse of a fast-moving object about to fall on your head.
Limbic over-rides cognitive. When an animal is in a state of adrenalin arousal from fear, defense, excitement or just plain sensory overload, he not only doesn't listen, he can't hear you. It does no good to repeat "sit sit sit" to a dog who is on emotional overload. He isn't thinking, he is simply reacting to the stimuli around him. He must tune-in and re-connect with you before he will be able to hear what you have to say. You must be able to get his attention first, before you tell him what you would like him to do.


This is were the disruptive stimuli like A loud Noise , shaker can etc can help but there are other ways to get the dogs attention as well

Attention

Keep Your Dogs Attention

http://www.clickersolutions.com/articles/2002c/lostattention.htmUsing Circles to Regain Lost Attention
 

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They can act like Dennis the Menace and Bart Simpson combined. Mine spent the day stealing the tiles I was cutting. Everything in our house is 6 feet above the ground, or in storage tubs.
 

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Personally ,I like Soundtracks saying about hitting yourself with the newspaper when your dog does bad stuff it means you are responsible for allowing them to do whatever it is they are doing. Getting a puppy from a reputable breeder also makes a huge difference in the puppy you get and they would be the first to tell you a basset is not lazy.
 

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When I got Annie I couldn't wait for her to get out of the hyper puppy stage and then when she turned 2...I again wondered when she would calm down. She will be 7 in December and she STILL has all the crazy puppy energy she has ever had. And I wouldn't change a thing. Granted, the energy spurts are shorter...but then again, so are mine LOL.

Mikey posts videos...watch them and then try the techniques shown. They really do work. In fact, at 6 years old Annie just learned that she has to sit before she gets meals or treats...and I taught her to do this based on the techniques in the videos.
 

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I think those training techniques Mikey is putting up are awesome. Watch the videos! They help if you want to put effort into them.

Hank has a horrible pee-problem as well. But it's nothing to do with UTI or anything medical of the sort, it's because not everyone in the household is biding by the "food/water schedule" I had Hank on a very strict schedule at the beginning when I first got him, but because we own other dogs and they don't have certain schedules, his soon became nonexistent. The other member of the house hold will not agree to the schedule, thus causing a pee-cartography each day because food/water is left out constantly....

SCHEDULES WORK! FOOD/WATER SCHEDULES ARE SUPER IMPORTANTE!
If yours is peeing on stuff, limit access to water. pooping = limit food.

Mikey speaks words of wisdom. We each have our own experience.. Please take our advice to heart :) All the best of luck to you and yours as well!
 

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Hiya Candycornsnake--
sorry to hear about your experiences so far, sounds super frustrating. tho your basset is really, really cute!!

agree w/what Mikey says about limiting food, so that then she's more likely to work for food. Megets 2 meals & no access to food inbetween. that means i'll do anything for pretty much any food (all seem pretty high-value to me), including chicken, steak, hot dogs, but also carrots, tangerines, brussel sprouts, peanut butter, etc.

the list you are doing sounds good. if not having a UTI, would suggest going back to Housebreaking 101-- like what Mikey, Soundtrack, & Bubbad says and describes.

We do wonder if your basset is crated for too long. Worm is in his 4-5 hours/day at most, and he can definitely hold it in that time period. Worm is probably just a month or two younger than your basset. Today i had to leave him 8-3:30. i felt that would be too long so put him in daycare today from 8-6pm. he is tired & sleeping now (and has already done most of his peeing/pooing for the day).

if you have to leave her 8-3pm, i would definitely suggest 1 or 2 days of daycare/week. and then either having someone come to take her out once in the middle of that time. or come home to take her out at lunchtime myself. Worm currently does 1 day of daycare/week. Worm will still be tired tomorrow morning from daycare which is a plus. don't know if that would be the same for your basset.

definitely appropriate to use a crate to keep her out of trouble. that is a big reason we keep Worm in a crate when we're gone. if not, he would tear a lot of things up, as we've seen glimpses of. we followed him around like a hawk for 1 1/2 months. in that time he learned not to chew things, not to chew furniture, not to pee in the house, not to poo in the house. after that we were done following him, and these behaviors stuck. no problems after he learned.

i was worried about Worm peeing in my bed too. Mikey's probably right about why it happens (she has substrate preference for cloth/sheets/cotton....). i would be grossed out by that and would be frustrated too. if i were you, i'd probably keep her out of my room altogether until she got the hang of not peeing in her crate or inside the house/living space at all. and if i let her in my room, i'd leash her and watch every move she makes. at the end of a "session" if she didn't pee, i'd give her a treat. if you catch her starting to pee, either stop her & take her outside, or if she doesn't stop when you tell her 'no' i'd keep shallow containers in every room of the house & put it under her when she goes. actually, that's how i collected a urine sample for Worm when we needed one.

she's probably too big these days to carry, but at 4 months, i would pick Worm up when he went on our carpet (we had 6-12 accidents total) & carry him outside to his pee spot, and then he'd finish peeing. did that a couple times and he learned.

glad u r taking her to that class & also getting an animal behaviorist. good luck & please keep us posted!
 
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