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Toby was diagnosed with arthritis about 6months or so ago. (Both back legs,at the knee joints, one worse than other).He had been at his usual vet 2 weeks before for yearly boosters and no mention was made of this. Had an accident at park and I took him to another vet(my own vet was closed) He made the discovery and said it
that he had probably had it for some time. I guess I looked as if I didn't believe him because he let me feel his leg whilst he moved it and I did feel a sort of grating sensation. He is now on metacam and seraquin and will receive blood tests every 6mnths or so to check his liver. He is restricted to 3 fifteen minute walks per day.

When I asked how he could have got this, he replied that it is very common in bassets because of their shape. Now I haven't heard of many bassets having this, and rarely on here do I hear someone coming on and saying their basset has arthritis. I know older dogs get this but he had just turned 7 when this was diagnosed..

I now think I may stay with this vet as I'm pretty dissapointed in my former vet for not picking this up as I was assured that Toby would have been in pain for some time.

Just wondering how many have a basset with this and if anyone has ever used acupuncture to treat it.
 

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When I adopted Bogie, the rescue I got him from warned that bassets very commonly get arthritis and can get it earlier in life than some other breeds. My guy is bowlegged and I was told by two vets he will probably have some signs of arthritis by the time he's 5 or 6.
 

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I think any long-backed, short-legged, heavyish dog is a lightning rod for arthritis. I knew Stomps had arthritis in his back, but no vet I'd ever taken him to before mentioned seeing it anywhere else. But then Stomps hurt his back very badly in January and couldn't use his hind legs. When IV steroids and rest did no good, I took him to a center where I live that has a bariatric chamber, admittedly as a last-ditch effort. The vet there looked at the x-rays that Stomps' regular vet had taken and asked if I knew Stomps had arthritis in his hind hips and front shoulders and legs, in addition to in his back. I hadn't and said as much. Whereas my regular vet told me that Stomps probably wasn't in any pain, this vet said he most definitely was. That made my mind up for me about what to do for him (he's now ATB). Arthritis should be one of the easiest things to diagnose in a dog, so I don't know why my vet didn't see it. It could have saved Stomps many days of suffering. 7 is very young for a dog to have arthritis as severely as your dog does, but I'm sure it happens. You might talk to your vet about Adequan injections (or something similar). There are several good injectable joint lubricants on the market now. With an older dog I used to have, I gave them to her myself (IM, not IV). I was lucky in that I knew a vet who got it for me at cost. Otherwise it can be expensive. Good luck and keep us updated about Toby's progress.
 

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My Yogi was diagnosed last year with arthritis and he is just six years old. I said something to my vet about it and we had xrays taken to see just what the problem was while he was under for a dental. Needless to say I was very shocked to learn he had arthritis, she didn't seem to think it was too severe but I am now questioning that based on my own observations of him. He has an appointment next week for a wellness type of checkup and we are seeing a different vet and I do plan to ask this vet to look at his xrays again and see what he thinks as I do think this is progressing faster than what I would like to see. I am wondering what I might be able to do to help him. Right now he is on Glyco-Flex II which I do thinks helps but maybe just not enough. It is really sad as I don't consider six (soon to be seven) an old dog. :(
 

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Thanks for these replies folks. I suppose what gets me is why I never noticed it either. I was dragging him off on 2hour walks and he wasn't limping I did notice that sometimes he didn't want to go but I put that down to him being so stubborn but once there he was fine. Sometimes he wouldn't finish all his food' but again I put this down to him getting 'fussy'. He was sometimes a bit stiff in the morning, but then so am I.

He was a dog who was used to getting long walks off lead,running free and now he is restricted to 3 small walks on lead. I find that pretty sad :(

Seems like this disease isn't so uncommon after all :(
I'm going to ask about the lubricants you mentioned L&S. They sound like a good idea.Seems like your experience with the vet was similar to mine.

He is starting a course of water therapy at the vet school next week as I have read that this can be really benificial for arthritis.

Mahna, I think you were fortunate to have been told that by the Basset rescue, I got Toby from a shelter,and they probably didn't know this about bassets.

Yogi's Mom, I think you must have been very vigilant to have picked that up yourself about Yogi, probably saved him alot of suffering.

The vet told me that arthritis is extremely painful but dogs are very stoic concernng pain . I think what this has taught me is that what I consider to be a relatively minor symton that one of my dog's is displaying, to not take it at face value, they could in fact be suffering a great deal.

Thanks again for your helpful replies. :)
 

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I should have mentioned this in my first post, and you probably already know this, but don't let him get on any furniture. I have steps leading up to the dogs' favorite chair, but Lightning comes down the steps with such gusto that I think even that is bad for him. The water therapy will be great. I'm sorry this has happened to him.
 

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Pearl has had evidence in arthritis in her shoulder joints since she was about 5; in her hips since she was about 6. She is 8 now. She's happy and spry and active. Keep them active, keep them slim (she weighs about 45 pounds, down from almost 60 when she was about 3 ), but, of course, keep an eye on them, and don't push them if they appear uncomfortable. For example, Pearl has obedience titles, but i don't show her in obedience any more, partly because her jumping just didn't look good--not as if she was in pain, but hitting the jump and such. I'm sure it was the arthritis. She's also quite allergic, and I some times wonder if the two aren't connected some how.
 

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Personnally I do not think basset are any more prone to arthritis than other breeds when corrected for body condition, fitness level and age.
Two dramatic ris factors for painful arthritis are overweight and lack of exercise. I think being too protective of the breed leads to some of the problems the one seeks to avoid. It is fare better to maintain a lean body weight and at least a moderate fitness level even if this consits of occasional jumping I have had only one basset in which arthritis was and issue and that did not occur until she was 15 years old.

CANINE ARTHRITIS
What treatments are available?

•Remember firstly to deal with any problems of obesity.
•If there is a traumatic cause , surgical repair of ligaments may be necessary to stabilise the joint.
•Fitness and exercise are important.
•Anti-inflammatory medications may be necessary to control pain and inflammation and are extremely beneficial when used sensibly and under the guidance of your veterinarian.
•Acupuncture can give excellent results in pain management and may
eliminate the requirement for medications.[/b]
Causes of Dog Arthritis
 

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Sadie was diagnosed with arthritis and took medication for it for the last 4 or 5 years of her life. She took a variety of meds, having to be switched when one lost its effectiveness. The last and most effective medicine she took was Metacam. Continuing to check the liver is a good idea. Sadie began to show liver damage in the last year of her life & had to go on medication for her liver, because her arthritis was too bad to stop those meds. Spencer was also diagnosed with arthritis, but his is milder & didn't bother him much until recently, within the last 6 - 8 months or so. He is now on daily arthritis meds, but he is almost 13 yrs old. Sadie & Spencer showed their arthritis symptoms differently. Sadie never showed any signs of pain & kept moving, but she would walk around like she was drunk & stumble. Spencer on the other hand appeared to be in pain. It's amazing how the meds gets them moving again. Before regular meds, Spencer would walk like a stiff old man & lay around alot. Now, he sometimes has the energy of a much younger dog & keeps me active. :)
 
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