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Discussion Starter #1
The lovely and talented Bailey has eaten part of a lily bulb.

I knew something was wrong yesterday when I returned home to a pile of vomit. :unsure: Then, a few hours later, she hawked out a tiny amount of bile and goo. :eek: It was projectile vomiting of sorts but not a lot.

I didn't take her to the vet because she looked good, acted good, ate like a piggie yesterday evening and has been her usual wild self.

But about an hour ago, I discovered that she'd apparently unearthed a cache of lily bulbs - she was on the back porch mouthing one of them. I realized then she'd like eaten one and that was probably responsible for her vomiting.

She seems fine now, but I want to make sure my sense of "well, she looks good, she's eating, there's been no more vomiting, and she's still insane so she must be okay!" isn't way off base.
 

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Most bulbs are listed as toxic to pets, and it's recommended that access to stored and freshly planted bulbs be restricted. Hope Bailey is feeling more like herself this morning. :)
 

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Oh she's her usual crazed and lovely self. Even when she projectile vomited :blink: , she immediately scampered off to tackle Yogi. Her spirits are good, her poop looks good, she's eating, etc.

I went around yesterday afternoon pulling all the lilies in the back yard out of the ground. I'm just going to plant them up front where she can't get to them.

I'm glad to know there are no secret, lasting effects.
 

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To be more specific a large numbe but not all Lilies are toxic see
Lily Plant Toxicity but it appears cats are much more effected than dogs.

Lillium
Lilium bulbs are starchy and edible as root vegetables, although bulbs of some species may be very bitter. The non-bitter bulbs of L. lancifolium, L. pumilum, and especially L. brownii (Chinese: 百合 干; pinyin: bǎihé gān) are grown at large scale in China as a luxury or health food, most often sold in dry form. They are eaten especially in the summer, for their ability to reduce internal heat. They may be reconstituted and stir-fried, grated and used to thicken soup, or processed to extract starch. Their texture and taste draw comparison with the potato, although the individual bulb scales are much smaller.

Although they are believed to be safe for humans to eat, there are reports of nephrotoxicosis (kidney failure) in cats which have eaten some species of Lilium and Hemerocallis[1].




But this is a big but. Lily are a late spring/summer flowering bulb. and ususally have greens for most of the summer. So there should still be a stalk and greens on the plant. this early in the seasonhowever OK would be ahead of us in the North East. Are you sure they are Lily bulb and not some other type.

Again as Betty mention many bulb are toxic but not all. Tulips for example are loved by many rodents. It is often Suggest to plant Daffadoils or even better Narcissus around tulips to protect them. besides being toxic they have an odor that tend to keep the pest away.

Narcissus (genus)
All Narcissus varieties contain the alkaloid poison lycorine, mostly in the bulb but also in the leaves .[/b]
 
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