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One of my friend's Bassets was rushed to the Emergency vet last night and had emergency surgery to remove a large rock from her intestine. She came through the surgery okay so far but she'll be hospitalized for at least three days to be sure everything is allright. Several years ago they rushed another young Basset to the emergency vet and that outcome was tragic. He had extensive damage to his intestine and he developed a serious infection and died. I'm hoping that this outcome will be better for my friend's sake and that of her sweet little girl.

I have two questions:

1) There are several rock-eating hounds on this board and I know at least one of you (if not more) uses a soft muzzle to protect your hound. My friend is seriously considering using one to prevent future problems, once her girl is safely home. Any advice on where to get one and the best one to buy? Or any tips to help the dog to adjust to using one?

2) This second question is for breeders, vets, or other experts. Is there a hereditary factor to rock-eating? I ask this because this little girl shares a father with the hound that died, and thier mothers are sisters... all the dogs come from very well-known and reputable breeders (who will be notified of the incident - I'm sure they would want to know). It seems like more than a coincidence that two siblings from separate litters developed the same bad habit. Any thoughts on the subject?

Please pray for my friend's little Basset...
 

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1)Any advice on where to get one and the best one to buy? Or any tips to help the dog to adjust to using one?

2) Is there a hereditary factor to rock-eating?[/b]
A basket muzzle, rather than a soft muzzle, is usually recommended for rock eaters. To answer the second question, while not every rock eater comes from a line of rock eaters, the behavior does seem to run in some lines.

Sending best wishes for a speedy recovery for your friend's basset.
 

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Rusty had surgery for a rock obstruction in July. I believe this was an isolated incident. I "think" it must have something yummy on it like soda, etc. We take him out quite a bit and I've never seen him show any interest in any rocks anywhere. I don't believe he intended on swallowing it. I think he took it in his mouth because of the taste or smell and it went down?? Now all of this is just what I believe since he can't tell me how or why it happened :rolleyes: Thankfully we caught it in the early stages. He acted VERY weird and we knew something was terribly wrong. His intestines didn't suffer any damage. Not even bruising. It was very fortunate that it was early morning and we were home with him. From what I've read and heard from the Vet, timing is crucial for rock eaters. The more time in the intestines, the more damage. Each case is different.

SO, we don't muzzle him. I have heard that rock eaters are hereditary. Hopefully some with others with rock eaters will join this discussion. Sending healing drool to your friend!
 

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We have a rock eater, Bogie, who will be three in April. He has had two surgeries for swallowing rocks. The first time we were camping, and we THINK he swallowed it because rocks were under the picnic table and food, etc. had been spilled on them. We knew something was wrong when he started circling in obivious distress, lying down and stretching out, then throwing up. Rushed him to the vet who x-rayed, saw the rock, and did emergency surgery. The intestine was stretched so thin she said you could have read a newspaper through it. Thankfully he recovered fine.

The second surgery was after we had scoured our yard for rocks and thought we were OK. The cable people came and dug at the back of the house unearthing rocks and concrete whch they threw in the bushes along with a coke can and doughnut. Again Bogie started circling, stretching, and rushed him to the vet. Another x-ray, another rock, another surgery. Lucked out this time, smaller just stuck in crook of intestine and they were able to shake it down to the rectum and retreive it without cutting into the intestine. Another good recovery.

Bogie nows wears a basket muzzle when he is out in our yard or when we are traveling or camping in rocky areas. He does not wear it when we take him for neighborhood walks. It's an "Italian Basket Muzzle" made of polyethlene, and Bogie can bark, pant, and has learned to drink water with it on. We don't leave him outside without checking on him, since he did hang it in the bushes once and got stuck. We ordered it from KV Vet Supply via the internet. Bogie has adapted to it really well, and it goes with him to the kennel when we are out of town.

The only bad thing is when we are out in public and Bogie has on his muzzle, people think we have a mean biter and will walk out of our way. I'll stop them and tell them he is friendly, just a rock eater. Makes for some interesting conversations, but Bogie gets lots of pats and belly rubs, too.


Our little hockey goalie.


I did have to wrap netting around the sides and secured it with dental floss. Bogie learned he could lay on the ground, put his head down flat, and stick his tongue through the holes and lap up things.

I sure hope your friends Basset will be OK. As to being genetic, I'm not sure on that. We informed his breeder ,and she did say she had another Basset some years back that had swallowed rocks.
 

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A basket muzzle, rather than a soft muzzle, is usually recommended for rock eaters. To answer the second question, while not every rock eater comes from a line of rock eaters, the behavior does seem to run in some lines.

Sending best wishes for a speedy recovery for your friend's basset.[/b]

FWIW a basket muzzle is less likely to interfere with breathing during exercise and also won't interfere as badly in the dogs most effective means of cooling "panting" a soft muzzle is not a good choice for long time wear or during physical activity like running around out side.
 

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Thank you for the replies so far. As soon as we know that my friend's Basset is okay and coming home, I'll print this thread for her to read. It helps immensely to hear of other people's experiences and how they handled them. Thanks again...
 

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Edith Ann wears a basket muzzle, and has ever since we had to have two rocks removed from her intestines a couple of years ago. When a dog shows a propensity for eating rocks, you can never trust that they won't do it again, and if they go out for romps in the yard as ours do, a muzzle is the only sure way to prevent ingesting. 'Course, Eloise's favorite trick is to pull the muzzle off, so we have to watch the situation very closely, but so far -- no more rocks in the gut, and that's a good thing.

Edith comes from a long line of rock eaters, and her breeder swears there is some genetic twist at work.....
 

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Folks, this very same discussion is currently happening over at the DailyDrool message boards. One of the members' bassets has just had her third (or fourth?) surgery for rock removal. If any of you are members over there, she could use some encouragement/words of wisdom/advice, whatever. I've also urged her to join over here and talk to you guys. Her name is Rachel and she has two females, both about the same age. Had them from puppies...one's a rock-eater, one's not. Here's a link to the discussion over there. Hope it works.

http://dailydrool.hyperboards.com/index.ph...p;topic_id=7967
 
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