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Discussion Starter #1
Hello! I've been floating around for a while : )

Just wanting some advice.

Maybe about two months ago, or possibly more, Bowser started to limp on his front leg, for no apparent reason. It was really hard to tell which leg it was. I mentioned it to my vet and he said to just keep him from jumping for a couple weeks. My response was "yeah right" considering everything he does (being a puppy and all) means "OH BOY *bounce*" right on his front legs! lol
So there we stand. He is STILL limping. It alternates...first he'll be fine, then he'll lay down for a while and nap..when he gets up it's a horrible limp on say, the left foot....then the cycle starts again a few hours later and then it's the right foot when he gets up!

My husband and I have rubbed his paws, legs, shoulders, neck, spine....nothing illicits a squeal, bark, twitch, or even change in expression. I just cannot figure out what's wrong! And it's SO dramatic and pathetic when he gets up from his nap! it breaks my heart, this limping!!!

But a few minutes later he's chasing our beagle around the couch and running and playing. I can't make him stop either. so...now what??

i worry when he was growing so fast maybe something was messed up with his bones because of how malnourished he had been. He was only 6 weeks old when i got him (actually a day before 6 weeks because i wanted him asap) and his ribs were showing, and he had a fat worm filled belly : (

what do you guys think? : (
 

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Sounds like panosteitis. This is relatively common in young male bassets.

Generally strict crate rest for several weeks is recommended, along with anti-inflammatories. There is some debate as to whether diet has an effect, but I generally recommend switching the pup to adult food if he hasn't been already.

ANY signs of lameness in a young Basset should be taken seriously, although they are a pretty tough breed when mature they are delicate and easily injured as pups. I'm concerned that your vet did not take this more seriously - maybe you need one that is more familiar with this breed.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
well i was kind of bothered that the vet didn't seem to care, but then i was baffled too that he didn't seem to be in pain (but, hello, he is limping! so something is up)
Thank you for this lead...i was hoping to get some idea.

In looking it up it says he should show some signs of pain when pressed on the affected area, but he doesn't. Or i'm just not finding the right spot.

he's had the limp for months, and about a month ago i had his thyroid and glucose levels tested (they are fine) because i found out he had MANGE. ugh. a leftover gift from his poor treatment as a puppy before i got him. I just didn't realize what it was or that it was weird that he was itchy, since he didn't seem that itchy. it was only when the patches finally became noticeable. And then of course i was told "well he's losing his puppy hair and growing into his adult hair". Ugh. Every time i think there is something wrong, someone treats me as if i'm just being an over protective mom! lol

coincidentally i have been pulling back on the puppy food and trading out one meal of it for a meat and regular dog food meal.

i will continue to try to reduce his activity (*rolls eyes* he bounces all the time. you'd think if it hurt he wouldn't do that!! or man he has a high tolerance for pain!) and will work on the food.
I have to admit i've been at a loss...i'm all paranoid about the food. Some people say make sure your puppy has tons of protein! but then not too much, but then take vitamins!, but then don't...etc lol

ok anyway the advice is appreciated and well taken!
 

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...i'm all paranoid about the food. Some people say make sure your puppy has tons of protein! but then not too much, but then take vitamins!, but then don't
Protein was implicated in a lor of the growth issues of large breed dogs but more studies have been done protein is not a problem it is strickly calorie in take. However since protein is closesly tied to fat increasing protein often means increasing fat which increase caloriic density ( amount of calories per volume of food) enormously. So for an older puppy you are looking for a higher protein without a higher fat. While as with anything too much can be a problem vitemins general are not an issue. For larger breed dogs the one to be concern with is vitemin D which does increase calcium up take. While it was once though that growing puppies especial larger breed dogs would need lots of calcium. Turns out most of the orthopedic conditions associated with larger breeds are cause or at lease made worse by too much calcium. You do not want to supliment with additional calcium or with vitamin D.

While pano is a wandering lameness that lamness wander of a period of months not a single day so there may be something else at play. You may want to consult with a vet that specialized in orthopeadics. Keep in mind however man still do not see a lot of basset and are not that famialar with the breed. There short limbs provide them with some protection from forces that would cause problems in other dogs but don't with them. Hip displasyia being one. basset hips are general much worse that those breed general associated with the disease. yet basset general are not debiliated by it to the extent those breed are. The same goes for elbow dysplasia etc.


A quick diagnostic check for pano is to squeeze the long bones of the legs humerious, ulna, femur,tibia etc of the legs in the middle of the bone. If the dog experience or shows sign of pain in one of the bones you can be pretty well assured that it is pano. There are not an signifcant or likely other cause than pano in a puppy that would cause that. Other problem would result in pain at the joints not the middle of the bone. Because the dog does not register pain when you squeeze does not rule out pano however, as dogs are stoic and often repress signs of pain and the cycles pano goes through pain in the middle of a long bone is not always pressent, just as the characteristic mottling of the bone on x-ray is not always present.
 

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Yeah I'd say it sounds like pano to me as well... sounds very much like our boy when we first got him around 6 months old. I'd switch him to an adult formula or all life stages formula dog food if you haven't already.
 

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it all sounds reasonable to me. I tried extra vitamins when we first got him (at six weeks old) and he just didn't seem as healthy on them, so i stopped only a few weeks later. He's just be on Holistic Select, large breed puppy food for now. We threw away the bag or i'd check for the calcium content.

I'll be checking my area to see if i can find someone more familiar with bassets to run it by them and see...Bowser is actually 7 months old now, and has had the limp for maybe...well at least two months but i want to say longer than that. ...obviously it comes and goes. : )
we used to feed him california natural puppy food, but i think he limped even before we changed it to organic select.

of course i look over at him Right NOW and he's got his butt and back legs up about 7 inches on a bed, and the rest of him is draped over it and onto the floor, and then his head is on a squeaky toy....so needless to say it's very hard to keep him from contorting himself or whatever *LOL*
that's another reason it's been so hard to figure out...he's constantly in these bizarre positions (see my photos of him on his back all twisted like a pretzel lol)

anyway i'm rambling again. again, i was worried about the food because i was told he should be on puppy food until he is 12 months, but i will take the advice and run it by a good vet! Thank you guys, so much! i have to admit i'm surprised at how specific a problem this is and that everyone could help so much. I was thinking i would get the same answer as the vets gave LOL But you guys are awesome! (of course, you know your bassets after all!!)
 

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General a large breed puppy food will have a lower calcium level than the regular food. On of the main reason for the sugestion to switch to adult food for larger breeds was that puppy food tends to be calorical dense so it is much easier to over feed. Most Large breed puppy food are less so so this is becoming leff of a problem with them however It all a range and varies greatly between brands so making catagorical statements about a version/type of food can be misleading


FWIW pano typically begins at the age 5-6 months, There is no evidence to support diet as a cause of pano. At one time it was thought to be an infection as well and that has been ruled out as well. The cause has be very elusive except their does seem to be some genetic connection,
 

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If you have not done any research on pano No that it is a self limiting diease once the dog stops growing it subsides and the dog is none the worse for wear.
 

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If you were in this area (PA), I would say Lyme disease and suggest either doxycycline or amoxycillin -- Birdbiotic or Fishmox. They can be bought on line and might be worth a try.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Bowser is doing pretty good. I've been really trying to restrict his jumping and stair activity and that does wonders. He still limps though. He doesn't seem to mind it.

And Lyme disease...he's never had a tick, but just to make sure i checked and he also doesn't have any other symptons for it. Thank you though!
I really think at this point it's the panosteitis.

Oh by the way, it's hard to keep him immobile when he loves to go to the park and go up and down the kiddie's slide! LOL he climbs up the stairs and goes down the slide! hehe
 

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Glad to hear that Bowser is improving and that your keeping him off the stairs and restricting his jumping. You're probably also best to take him on several short walks if you can, rather than long walks as I'm sure this will help his recovery too.
 

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Just for general information ---- you will never see the tick that can give a dog Lyme disease and there are no consistent symptoms of Lyne disease -- Elmer did the alternate leg limp, but Jason just became lethargic - he would run rabbit for 20 minutes, then come sit with me--- both were tested positive for Lyme.
Now I don't even test, I put the dog on antibiotic ( Birdbiotic or Fishmox) and if it is Lyne, the symptoms disappear with in 3-4 days and I continue the treatment for 30 days
 

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Yeah i keep telling my husband no long fast walks! he's such a monster walker with his long legs that bowser and i can't keep up with our short ones *lol*

And Dean...yeah i didn't figure we'd ever see the tick if he had one, lol I've only ever seen one before on another dog and THAT was plenty (yuck!!) I suppose it couldn't hurt to have him tested.
This little guy has been through a LOT. Worms, ear mites, ear infection, belly worms, undernourishment, is currently being treated for mange that i didn't realize he came with...bah. I had his thyroid and glucose checked and those were normal. He's just been a big pile of "has everything bad" for a dog! lol
 

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I didn't see this mentioned, but thought it worth noting. You will probably never get your little guy to winch or show any sign of pain when you're checking his legs, paws, pads, etc. Survival is still hardwired into these guys. Any sign of pain is a sign of weakness, and any sign of weakness is a fast track to death in the wild. My guy has had issues with his back hips and both front paws ( he's only 3 ), and every time he shows a limp, I will never be able to find exactly where it's hurting him.

Also, just because he doesn't seem to mind that he's limping, and still continues to run and jump around, doesn't mean it's a good thing for him. It's still a good idea to rest him, no matter how much he wants to run around and play. For me personally, I found the best solution was to just get on the ground with my guy and play with him and his toys. I am able to control his play that way. I'll grab his rope toy or stuffed animal or something and move it around. I do it in a way that he's still sitting/laying down and not running around. If he tries to go tug of war on me, I'll roll him on to his back or side so that way he's not using his paws for leverage.

It's also worth mentioning. MY guy is a lap dog, all 55lbs of him. So if he starts to run around and play, I can normally restrain him by simply picking him up and putting him on my lap. Sometimes hold him there til he gives up.
 

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It's also worth mentioning. MY guy is a lap dog, all 55lbs of him. So if he starts to run around and play, I can normally restrain him by simply picking him up and putting him on my lap. Sometimes hold him there til he gives up.
LOL yup, Bowser totally thinks he's a lapdog too. And he's 40lbs now. And "the lazy game" is what we often play...him lying down and biting at toys lol

I run into trouble because we live in a two story town house. He will CLIMB the dog barrier i put up to keep him from doing the stairs, and meet me up in the bathroom when i'm up there. He just always has to know where I am. I've had to be pretty inventive to keep him downstairs. Also he and Daisy will try to run around the house. That's usually stopped pretty fast because the baying and barking is so loud between a beagle and a basset that our eardrums insist on quiet! lol

It really is the stairs. He is so intent on going up and down them. We were hoping for a house this year, but no deal. So we wait until next year. Definitely going for a place with no stairs!!
 

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You're not alone!!!!!

Dear Author

I had the exact same problem with my Basset Hound Alfred. He was about ten months old when someone close to him left the family, and several weeks later he developed a limp in his back hind leg. He did not sustain this limp from a fall or accident from what I understand. The limp got worse and after a couple of days I took him to the vet. She gave him some anti-inflammatories but he began get worse, refusing his food and water for over a week. During this time he visited the vet almost daily and she could not understand what was wrong. We tried to feed him everything, from steak, to sausages to whatever a basset would only dream of eating. No luck. He was so sick and upset (there is nothing sadder than a sad basset). One night my neighbour made him a bowl of rice, cooked mince and vegies mixed together. He ate a little, then some more, then finished the whole bowl. He then drank some water. The next day he was happier and his leg began to heal, and so began the road to recovery. It was the worst, most frustrating and sad time of my life. I'm not sure if this is pano, but from what I've read....I think it's spot on (sorry vets, I could be wrong). Best of lick with your hound & don't give up!!!!
 

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It would be better if you could crate him to really keep him off of the leg.Bassets are very stoic they usually show very little reaction to pain.
 
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