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Discussion Starter #1
Am starting Trudy in agility, and doing well so far. I have just been using a flat collar, but our trainer suggests using a short "tab" leash on dogs to be able to grab them when necessary. She is really short legged, and even a SHORT tab is going to be too long. I have seen flyball collars with a "handle" sewn in to the back of the webbing, and I have been looking at flyball harnesses, with the idea of clipping a tab leash on the back ring. Any recommendations?

So far no real problems, she is following hand signals. She is loving it!
 

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I would never use a tab on a dog agility training simply too dangerous. Mine have always been trained naked,. If you need the collar to control/coerce the dog then you need to rethink the training.
 

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We are just in "intro" mode....8 dogs in the class including a couple not so very in control. Nothing too fast or dangerous here. So far introduced targeting, and short tunnel, caveletti (sp?), & flat ladder for footwork, and tire & low "jump", mainly uprights...no height. I think the trainers main concern is to catch dogs that get over enthused. Thanks for the input, I won't worry about it....
 

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Oh...great....thanks for the link. Our business looks like it is finally going to sell, so I might be able to get to some shows this summer. Not so easy when you have a summer resort! Will be watching some local agility meets. I am so impressed with how Trudy is loving this!
 

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PS....LOVED the videos! Obviously the dog is loving it too. Trudy also barks.....was wondering if that was a problem....apparently not so much!
 

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think the trainers main concern is to catch dogs that get over enthused.
then the owner never learn to control the dog without it. How to judge arousal level. and maintain a connection with the dog. I see this more when dogs are not working the equipment and wait there turn. Owners turn their focus on the dog ahead of them or using the equipment not their own dog.
 

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keeping in mind there is not just one way to accomplish in dog training but we all have our preferences and whats work best for ourselves. The most common plae I have seen a collar hold or tab used is training contact obstacles. There are a lot of point a flat piece of fabric can get caught. like hinge areas. I have also seen them used to force the dog which I am not a fan of either.
 

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I've always trained agility without a collar as well, the venue I started in does not allow dogs to run with collars. I would concentrate on a really solid recall and/or hand touch (the dog immediately comes and touches your palm with its nose). I also teach them that when chaos breaks out (like another dog running amok) that I will start handing out treats, so while things are out of control they stay focused on me.

I admit, my first thought at the mention of a tab was "Wow, that's really unsafe".
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the advice....am thinking once again that maybe I don't have a good trainer. Depressing...
 

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You're probably good to get started, but I suspect that if you really want to get into it you'll probably want someone else. Probably Cheryl can recommend someone if she is not close enough. You want someone who has competed a lot and/Or judges, they can better teach you handling which is just as important as teaching the obstacles.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Cheryl is a good 5 hours from us. Our instructor also teaches at the area agility club, she competes most weekends she says. There don't seem to be any better classes in the area. Our last trainer offers one, but she was VERY unorganized and inconsistent. I think for now we are good.

Cheryl says she is planning a Basset Agility Bootcamp this summer....may go if our schedule allows. I don't plan on being the next big thing, Trudy is just enjoying. I AM concerned about Bassets jumping so much, and the high dog walk frightens ME. Seems many obstacles are geared for agile long legged breeds, not dwarfs with short legs.....am concerned about falls and damage to backs/joints....so will see.
 

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Tabs are commonly used in agility training, We don't happen to like them but that does not mean someone how does is a bad trainer. It is sort of like end of contact behavior . there are a lot of choices train nothing, train running contacts, 2o2o, 1 toe on, four on the floor. etc. Each has it own advantages and disadvantages. Most basset trainer opt for the first which is not to bother training a behavior at all because there is no need to take up valuable training time fr something that is never going to be a problem. ie dog missing the contact , that is until you have a basset like Mariah that can stride over the contact area. 13 NQ in master standard solely for missed contact. one of those was the upside of the a-frame btw. Another time Judge shook her head not believing what she had seen and never called it

Just an example Grand Prix (basically standard course w/o table and much faster course time) allowed for up to 10 faults at the time. so even with the missed contact it was qualifing. Finished 4th if she did not miss the contact would have finished ...........4th.
 
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