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About 3 weeks ago, I got my now 10 week old Basset puppy, Otis. He is an absolute sweetheart and I adore him but I've noticed that when it comes to petting him and playing with him, he starts to get very snippy. At first it starts out gentle, and then he starts to get a little to excited and when I try to correct him by saying no firmly, it's like he takes it as a sign to launch at me and bite not so gently. Another thing is I noticed that he likes to launch/attack a lot.

I know that he is still a puppy and is teething but I just don't know how to get him to not be so aggressive because I don't want him to grow up thinking it's acceptable behavior.

Is he going to grow out of this? Or is it my training methods?
 

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Well it's unlikely he's teething yet. So what's going on is just a puppy who hasn't learnt that nipping even, a human, is OUT.

He won't 'grow out of this' unless you train him not to do this, and it helps if you don't let him get that excited. When he does, end the contact. Stand up and say No Biting!, take him outside to empty and then back to where he sleeps. Chances are he's getting overtired, just like human babies can. He needs to learn that not all his behaviour is accepted and that bad behaviour produces a reaction he won't like. Correct immediately, in the act, so he gets to recognise why you are not happy with him.

You are right, this kind of behaviour must be corrected so he doesn't grow up thinking what he's doing is OK.

Good luck because living with a Basset can be a ton of fun, but also frustrating.
 

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actually you dont want to teach him not to bite, first you want to teach him not to bite hard ie bite inhibition,. the mouthing will fade and grow out of it but there is only a limited time to teach the dog the most important thing for its survival living with humans bite inhibition see\

ather than "No bite," I strongly, strongly, strongly urge you to teach your puppy bite inhibition instead. Bite inhibition is a "soft mouth." It teaches the pup how to use his mouth gently. Does this mean that the pup will forever be mouthing you? No, not at all. Actually, regardless of the method used, puppies generally grow out of mouthing behavior after a few months.

So why should you teach bite inhibition? Because dogs have one defense: their teeth. Every dog can bite. If frightened enough or in pain or threatened, your dog will bite. That doesn't in any way make him a "bad" dog. It makes him a dog. It's your responsibility, therefore, to teach your dog that human skin is incredibly fragile. If you teach your dog bite inhibition that training will carry over even if he is later in a position where he feels forced to bite.

A story... Ian Dunbar tells a story of a bite incident he had to asses. A Golden Retriever therapy dog was leaving a nursing home and his tail was accidentally shut in a car door. The owner went to help, and the dog delivered four Level Four bites before she could react.

FYI, a standard scale has been developed to judge the severity of dog bites, based on damage inflicted. The scale is:

  • Level One: Bark, lunge, no teeth on skin.
  • Level Two: Teeth touched, no puncture.
  • Level Three: 1-4 holes from a single bite. All holes less than half the length of a single canine tooth.
  • Level Four: Single bite, deep puncture (up to one and a half times the depth of a single canine tooth), wound goes black within 24 hours.
  • Level Five: Multiple bite attack or multiple attack incidents.
  • Level Six: Missing large portions of flesh.

Technically, the woman received a Level Five bite from a long-time therapy dog. Dr. Dunbar wasn't the least bit surprised by the bites. I mean, the dog got his tail shut in a car door! Of course he bit! What shocked Dr. DUnbar was that a dog with no bite inhibition was being used as a therapy dog.

"But he's never bitten before." Of course not. And barring an accident like that, he probably never would have. But an accident is just that. An accident. Unpredicted. What if it had happened in the nursing home?


Bite Inhibition Training | Karen Pryor Clicker Training



 

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Hey,
I think it would be better to send him to a dog boarding hotel for one or two weeks. The aggressiveness will get reduced when he spends a few days with other dogs and professional trainers.
I strongly recommend pet boarding because my cooper (1-year-old) was alright after sending him to a dog boarding a few weeks after we bought him. He showed an aggressive nature a few days after we bought him. Growing up with this aggressiveness doesn't seem to be good. So we send him to a dog boarding hotel for two weeks as per my friend's suggestion.
You can see a significant difference in their behaviour after sending them to such a professional place.
 

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Hey,
I think it would be better to send him to a dog boarding hotel for one or two weeks.
I'm sorry but WHY would anybody send a 10 week BASSET puppy away to another strange place, with strangers. It might work with some dogs and breeds, but with the gentle Basset puppy - no way! Do as I say and when/if you let him get that excited, stand up, say No Biting!, take him outside to empty and back to his bed. At this age, puppy Bassets need a calm and happy new home - not being sent away. And understanding owners. This is quite often a puppy thing and like everything else he has yet to learn, this is another. PLEASE don't entertain the idea of sending him away, especially at this very young age. If this puppy was under 8 weeks when he came to you (that's illegal in many places, for good reason), he didn't have the vital time with his litter, playing and interacting so he started to learn how to be a well rounded adult. Only if we knew the people did we let our puppies go to their new homes before 10 weeks. We were quite happy to have them around that bit longer. It's all part of the weaning process.

Rather than sending this young puppy away - far better would be to talk to his breeder or other experienced BASSET owner about what's going on.
 

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Our basset puppy arrived at 8 weeks and was biting my hand in play regularly. With young sharp teeth, it made me jump which meant I had cuts.

29027


Shew was playing and learning soft bite , this is normal with all puppies.
 
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