Basset Hounds Forum banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello fellow fur lovers! Im new to the site. I own 2 bassets..Roscoe and Reese. Both just turned 1. The vet said they both have angular limb deformity. Reese's right leg is very noticably "crooked"..for lack of better words. Seemed to start showing around 7 months and has gotten worse. Shes not in pain and it does not slow her dow. She has to keep up withher crazy brother Roscoe lol. Luckily we have a ranch style so not to many steps for heShould i be worried? Who else has had experience with this? Thank u!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
My Cooper also has a crooked front leg. He is now 1 year 9 months. He had a spell of very slight limping as a pup, but it didn't last long. It doesn't bother him at all now, though I can see it is less stable when he is sitting with his hind legs to one side. We are leaving it alone.

Others posting about this type of issue generally recommend not doing anything unless it is bothering the dog. Most vets are not familiar with Basset bones, and may want to do surgery when it really isn't needed. No surgery is going to un-basset a basset's legs, and the recovery is long, difficult, and painful. If you do seek orthopedic care or opinion, make sure it is someone VERY familiar with basset hounds. Check with your local BH club for recommendations. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you ! I agree, Im if it aint broke (literally lol), dont fix it. She seems to be fine for now, no pain , not holding her back. I will keep my eye on it. Thanks for the info.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,775 Posts
we first noticed a problem with sophies front leg at about 5 months. vet initially thought pano /xray inconclusive. treated with nsaids/pain meds.

waxed and waned but at about 9 months, markedly worse deformity and leg would buckle. was on pain meds daily. revisit to vet yielded a referral to the university vet hospital and ortho specialist.

all due to premature closure of growth plate with adjacent bone continuing to grow resulting in the deformity, elbow incongruity and deformity at the paw.

was corrected with surgery. she is WONDERFUL now. no pain and can walk, run etc. the surgeon was fantastic...lots of experience with bassets.

everyone has different stories and different degrees of deformity. For our girl, this was the only option. We are so very grateful for the surgeon's skill. recovery was 5 weeks cage rest (she was ready to rip and run after 4 days!) so a very easy recovery. She was off of the post op pain meds rather quickly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,868 Posts
The vet said they both have angular limb deformity.
nearly alol basset have angular limb deformity to some degree as straight legs are more of a fault in the breed than crooked one. As Sk point oit it is a matter of degrees. most angular limb diformities require no intervention however if sever enough then surgery will reduce pain and othe problems long term,. It is why you need a vet with experience in the basset breed when making such decisssion and even then secomd and third opinions should be gathered,
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,035 Posts
I'm another one who believes that most vets don't understand Basset legs and how they grow. Sometimes surgery is necessary, but most of the time it is not. I've seen plenty of Bassets with very deformed fronts who lived normal pain-free lives. The average vet is much to quick to reach for the knife in these cases.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,487 Posts
I too am basically against surgical correction, UNLESS the animal is in constant pain, continually lame. Unfortunately I went through this premature closure of the growth plates, ulna both sides, thing with my current last Basset who was a buy-in. After x-ray to find out exactly was going on with him being lame, around 8 months (and yes I did fear pano, which it wasn't) we discussed the options re surgery and the vet, who specialises in bones and knows all about Bassets (so that was one hurdle I didn't need to overcome!!) said that even if he did go in, at that young age it would probably need to be done again as the other bones grew. His lameness ended, although he does have more turn out than I'd hoped for (and which has prevented me from going back into the ring which I'd hoped to do - much as actually I've seen worse in there!!:( ) So I'm glad I didn't put him through any surgery.

The only thing I would say is there is the possibility of arthritis setting in later on. But if any surgery you had done wasn't 100% successful, that may be going to happen in any case.

I would suggest that each situation is individual so provided you have a Basset-aware vet, and not one who is after money either, I'd be guided by his opinion but yes, if it ain't broke ............ :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,868 Posts
I would suggest that each situation is individual so provided you have a Basset-aware vet, and not one who is after money either, I'd be guided by his opinion
could not agree more, can't make diagnoses on-line at best can give you some guidelines,

and if you do not have a vet that meets the discription above, it is a good time to look for one that does,
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,775 Posts
the right vet/surgeon is indeed paramount.

while our ortho surgeon corrected the right leg problem surgically, he told us the problem in the left leg was minor and did not need surgical correction at least at this time.

point is, we were not even aware of a deformity in the left leg (right was so bad, left looked normal) now we can see the minor deformity and again, are grateful for the surgeon only operating on what needed surgical correction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Basset with diagnosed OCD and Pano

Hi everybody!
I'm new to this forum and joined because although I have had dogs all my life, I am a first time Basset owner. Digby will be 1 year old this month and started limping on front legs at 8 months old. The limp has jumped from one foreleg to the other with limping lasting approx 2 weeks on each side. Crepitus was detected in each elbow also. Xrays were taken and ortho vet has diagnosed OCD in both elbows with the onset of osteoarthritis visible. Elbow incongruity has occurred due to premature closure of ulna growth plates. Pano is also present although I'm not concerned about this as I know this will resolve at skeletal maturity.

Ortho vet is experienced in Bassets and other chondrodystrophoid dogs and has said Digby's problem is mild therefore he would not advocate surgery. I have been advised to use conservative management through restricted exercise, rest and weight control with the use of NSAID's as and when necessary.

My vet recommended putting Digby on Royal Canin Mobility food so that he benefits from the green lipped mussel in this food to help with his arthritis. Digby has been on this food for 10 weeks now. Does anyone have any experience of using this food for ortho reasons? Digby was weaned on Royal Canin Maxi Junior by the breeder and I kept him on this until the switch to mobility food.

Digby has never been over-exercised and is not allowed up stairs and he is lifted in and out of the car. He has never suffered any type of trauma. He has a ramp to get down the steps to the back garden. I did all I could to "Basset-proof" my property before bringing him home. He is only ever walked on grass.

My vet has recommended short walks on the lead from now on. I would be very interested and grateful to hear from other owners/breeders who are living with Bassets with same or similar problems regarding lifestyle for Digby since he will have this problem for the rest of his life.

Many thanks

Lorna - Digby's mum :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,868 Posts
so that he benefits from the green lipped mussel
I have used glycoflex which is a supplement with green lipped mussel not sure it made any difference and while intial studies were promising subsequent ones have not been.

Perna canalicula
Studies have found that Perna canalicula inhibits the 5-lipoxygenase pathway, which leads to the formation of leukotrienes. Many of the products of these pathways have inflammation-supporting properties.[citation needed] However, a systematic review of current scientific research on supplementation with Green-lipped mussel suggests a lack of compelling evidence for its use in humans with inflammation associated arthritis.[3]
New research hails NZ green lipped mussels as a super food

A new scientific trial found that more than half of all patients who took the freeze-dried mussel powder, produced by a Christchurch firm, had knee joint pain "significantly reduced".
which sound great until you look at other research the Gian NIS study on gluocosimine found a full 60% of partcipant that took gloucosimine had significant reduction in knee pain problem is 60% of those taking a placebo also had significant reduction in knee pain hence it was determend that goucosomine was no better than placebo at reducing moderate knee pain, severe knee pain results were inconclusive. It is unlikely there would be any adverse effect from including green lipped muscles in the diet so from that stand point if it does not work it only cost money,

the most signifant thing you can do is keep digby weight in check . and exercise moderate exercise is important for arthritis muscle strength helps support the joints and reduces problems.

as far as anything you did to cause the problem it is unlike but nutritional excess can be a cause of such problem ie being overweight or excessive consumption of calcium but unless you used a calcium supplement or fed a lot of dairy that is unlikely as well
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Thanks Mikey. Yes I've read articles on the ambiguous benefits of the green lipped mussel products. However, I have took the vet's advice and put him on Royal Canin Mobilty food but I can't say I have noticed a difference. It's expensive food but has a good reputation. I have never given dairy products or calcium supplements. Digby is attending vet every month now to have his weight monitored as they would like him to stay at 63lbs. Vet also said to keep him on lead during his short walks. Feel like that is very restrictive because he is such a healthy and energetic dog.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,035 Posts
FWIW, and this is purely my personal opinion.....

When my Kermit was diagnosed with a neck injury, the vet wanted me to severly limit his lifestyle. No running, short leash, no furniture, the whole nine yards. He too was an energetic and active dog, even though he was somewhat older at the time. I decided that making him live like that would be cruel *for him*, even though the vet warned that he could end up quadriplegic. So although I retired him from obedience (jumping), and made sure he kept fit, once he was done his course of crate rest I basically let him continue to live a normal dog life. He lived to be 13 with no further problems.

I would be careful while he is still growing to avoid further damage, but once he is done - I would let him be a dog and take our chances. Your mileage may vary. Know your dog.

I often think vets are overly pessimistic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Thanks Soundtrack. Opinions vary on this but my gut instinct is to let him be a dog too! I had been doing recall training with him off lead before his diagnosis of OCD/arthritis. Digby will be 1 yr old in two weeks. I have never over-exercised him. First few weeks of bringing him home from his breeder he only went as far as the back garden. After that I only gave him 5-10 mins on grass where I practiced recall. He does more sniffing at bushes and trees than constant walking so that's why I felt keeping him on lead all the time was a bit restrictive. He still has episodes of limping and during these phases I don't walk him, he only goes out the back. It's good to talk to other Basset owners to get opinions. Thanks so much for posting :)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,035 Posts
Speaking of which, I hope you are also talking with the breeder about this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Yes, I've kept breeder informed every step of the way. Sent her the xrays too so she could get her vet's opinion and a second ortho opinion. I'm in constant touch with her but it's also good to talk to lots of owners/breeders. Digby is the only Basset I've ever owned so it's been very educational and interesting talking to others also :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,487 Posts
"Digby was weaned on Royal Canin Maxi Junior by the breeder "

Boy did I pick up on this one. Guess what - my Frankie was weaned onto this food too. See what I have already written about him on this thread.

Pano is undoubtedly there in some bloodlines and I know his breeder had a previous litter, from similar (not the same dogs) bloodlines as Frankie's sire. So I went down that road too much as his lameness wasn't creeping, and there was no pain, although he was lame so must have been feeling something. X-rays ruled that out however.

I'd just say I'd NEVER touch RC because to me, it's far too high in protein for this breed. Unfortunately breeders often get sucked into all this hype when it's far better for puppies of this breed to come on steadily. Not be forced to look like adults at 6 months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,868 Posts
I'd NEVER touch RC because to me, it's far too high in protein for this breed
Studies have shown conclusively and multiple times protein levels do not contribute to orthopeadic conditions in young and growing dogs nor does it contribute to renal failure in older dogs. As a matter of fact because older dogs are less efficient at using protein so they actual require more as they age to maintain muscle mass.


Protein while it has the same caloric content as carbs is virtually never used for energy and never stored as fat. Excess is excreted. It does not contribute to weight gain which is a big risk factor for developmental orthopeadic condition. Now most hi protein foods are High fat as well and Fat has twice the calories as carbs so while not a problem per say if weight and portions are not controlled it can lead to excessive weight and a problem.

For what its worth I only feed Higher protein foods n o less than 27% and even higher when participatiang in dog sports. Higher protein levels have been demonstrated to reduce the incident of soft tissue injuries in sled dogs when training, Significantly.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top