Basset Hounds Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Aye up,

We have an 8-month old Basset pup called Maggie Moon. Moon is, for the most part, a good dog and is an expert at manipulating her owners with doleful looks and innocent presentation of tummies to be tickled, etc.

We've made some good progress I think; she is house-trained (she will go outside if the door is left open, and will ask if the door is closed), she doesn't bark when on her own or overnight, she will walk happily off her leash without running off (and will stay if told to) and doesn't pull when on the leash. On the whole, she's a lovely little dog.

There are, however, a couple of things we simply cannot seem to resolve. I guess we've been spoiled in the past with our old dog; a Labrador, who was trained to do just about anything and never put a paw wrong, but nonetheless it's frustrating that we cannot seem to find a way to stop this behaviour in Moon.

The first thing is jumping. Maggie bounces like a space-hopper in a spring factory. She jumps up at us, which we are dealing with slowly I think by ignoring it and praising her after she stops, but she jumps up at our kitchen surfaces and has stolen stuff from up there on the rare occasion we've forgotten to move it. We simply cannot seem to stop her doing this.

Secondly she chases our poor aged cat, Edwin. If she catches him she doesn't do anything - in fact she appears to be trying to give Edwin a hug, however he's not especially enamoured with Moon and she will often get a furry right-hook for her trouble, but this doesn't seem to put her off. We don't like her chasing Edwin as he's getting on in years now, and he doesn't like it. She does understand the 'leave' command - for example she will sit and wait by her food without touching it whilst we tell her to 'leave' but the same command doesn't seem to work when it comes to the cat.

The last thing is, despite being told constantly, her going upstairs and stealing Edwin's food, and generally making a mess. We just cannot seem to stop her. We've fitted a baby-gate now at the bottom of the stairs, but whenever we forget and leave it open (or sometimes as we open it to get up the stairs) she'll shoot up - again. If she's left to wander the house unsupervised (i.e. we're not in the same room as her) she can be quite destructive. Yesterday she ate the wife's Wisteria, which didn't go down at all well (for the wife, or the dog).

I appreciate that the Basset is a characteristically stubborn breed, but whereas with our old Lab we always felt that fundamentally she would do what we told her, with Moon we feel that whereas she is often obedient, ultimately she'll do what she wants!

Any tips or advice gratefully received, before I tear what's left of my hair out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Well I hope someone can help you with the food thing, but I have to say the way we overcame this was by never leaving food where Bailey could reach it, and everyone who came to our house knew this rule...because if you didn't learn it you lost it. I talked to a Breeder recently who refered to some of the dogs as "counter cruisers" which made me laugh because that was EXACTLY what Bailey did. I hope it's not one of those hopeless basset traits because I have two more coming! But even the 3 yo announces "somebody watch my food" before she leaves the table.

As for the jumping up, I was taught in the training classes we took to step towards the dog when they jump up on you, rather than step back or push them off.

I also keep the cat food up high were Bailey couldn't reach it, and the litter box turned so he couldn't snack on the poop....which now that he is gone I see he must have been doing anyway judging by the increase in poop output in the litter box.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,042 Posts
As you may have noticed, Bassets are NOT Labs. :D

For the jumping up, make sure you are paying her attention BEFORE she feels the need to jump. This is harder with a Basset than a Lab, because a Lab is already high enough for you to pet easily, whereas with the Basset you must bend over. It is not enough to not reward bad behavior, you also need to reward desired behavior to show the dog what IS expected.

As far as counter cruising and eating the cat food, it's much easier to manage the situation (make it impossible - baby gate, food out of reach) than it is to train a Basset not to do it. When training, intermittent reward is actually stronger than a constant reward, and every time she is successful at stealing food she is getting that powerful intermittent reward, so unless YOU can be perfect about stopping her from getting the reward every time it's pretty much a losing battle, especially with a breed as persistent as the Basset.

Chasing the cat is self-rewarding, so again either the opportunity must be removed (leash the dog in the presence of the cat, put the cat elsewhere in the house), or the cat will have to decide how best to cope with the situation (i.e. sticking to areas of the house where the dog can't go). FWIW, my black cat is still silly enough to come into the house while the pups are loose, whereupon he gets squished and barked at until I rescue him, although he's finally figured out not to go into the yard with them, since I can't always tell what they're barking at and he may be stuck there for a while. He does know enough to lie still once he's gotten himself into that situation.

For the destructiveness, possibly more exercise and some additonal training (giving her something to do) will help, but the main thing is that she obviously still needs supervision at all times so that her chewing energies can be redirected before they start.

with Moon we feel that whereas she is often obedient, ultimately she'll do what she wants!
And that is the essence of the Basset!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,271 Posts
Lightning and my cat get along great, but they do play rough sometimes, so I always make sure the cat has an escape route. Most of the time, Lightning is restricted to half the house. I put up baby gates, and I keep them high enough off the floor so that the cat can get underneath to safety. (In the interest of fairness, Lightning has dog doors so he can escape the cat when he needs to.) In general, I would recommend you restrict your dog's access to the entire house as it gives him less access to things he can destroy and/or eat. When I got bassets, I learned that I had to think like a basset and "basset-proof" the house, which means nothing left in their reach that I don't mind seeing eaten, the cushions on chairs that I want to keep turned up so that they can't get on the furniture, the cat's food in an area that they can't get to, dog doors aplenty, etc. etc. etc. It took a LONG time to figure all that out. And always keep in mind: A tired basset is a good basset. That's probably the most important advice I ever got.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
One of the things we have started to do when my husband leaves for work is have one of Basil's favorite toys in hand so that when Basil comes running around the corner of the house, my husband gives him the toy and they play for about two minutes and Basil seems happy with that scenario. When Basil jumps up on me, if I do not get down on his level quick enough, hey, I'm getting older and stiffer, I just put his feet down on the ground and talk to him and lots of petting. We do not have an issue with the food because Basil is an outside dog. We have over 1/2 acre fenced yard and he has full run of the yard. We do have two cats which are inside 100% and Basil would like to play with the guys but as they do not know what a dog is, (they were raised by our soft-coated wheaten terrier) we do not think it would be wise to put the three together at this time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you all for the advice - it sounds as though prevention is easier than cure. The gate thing is fine; it gives me an excuse to get lots of big noisy tools out and hack around for several days to make a twisted gnarled thing that resembles a gate (the one we have up is temporary at the moment), and Edwin doesn't seem afraid of Moon, just can't really be bothered with her. If she gets too 'enthusiastic' he's got a hook like Henry Cooper anyway (and a hat like Tommy Cooper).

I certainly had no illusions that Moon would be anything like our old Lab; had I wanted that, I'd have got another Lab (had my wife not been 'involved' in the decision anyway). I was simply making the point that we had been spoiled - even by 'Good Lab' standards she was a remarkable dog - other than having an extra stomach where her brain should have been, and that is one way in which the two of them are exactly the same.

I've been in all day today, and we've been trying the approach of making a point of ignoring her when she jumps, then praising her after she gives up - and it seems to be taking hold. Certainly she will stay down when she's told to. She even left off running for the cat on command, and she's starting to wait when told before running after treats I throw. So I guess progress, however slow, is still progress.

Do I see that one of the respondents has NINE of these ruddy things? That's shocked me into silence. I'm of for a pint with Edwin.

TG
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,042 Posts
Actually, at the moment I have 14, but there isn't enough room in my signature to list the puppies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,135 Posts
:mad::mad:Soundtrack:mad::mad:

Very disapointed in post, It is dishartening find training advice delivered in gramatical correct sentence with words spelled correctly an done in a suscinct manner not coming close to post length limit. If this keeps other this could become the accepted norm :rolleyes:



Just one thing to add As an eight month the dog is an adolesent want with that all the behavioral issues normally associated of mamailian adolescence not much different that human teenagers, Distructive chewing for the vast majority of dogs is more of a phase than a permenant behavior most out grow it, it is simply a matter of living through it.

Puppy Adolscence - or Demon Spawn
Every puppy of every breed -- and every adolescent of every species that raises its young -- goes through the same thing at adolescence. Adolescence is an important, necessary transition period between childhood and adulthood. As infants, these creatures were completely helpless, completely dependent upon their mothers for everything -- food, comfort, safety. In childhood, the creatures begin practicing the skills they'll need later.
However, they do it right there with mom in sight, so mom can protect or help as necessary. They instinctively know they aren't able to take care of themselves, so they stick close.
The eventual goal is, of course, adulthood. Complete independence. Mom won't be there to make decisions -- or to alleviate them of responsibility for their mistakes. The real world will be applying consequences, and those can be harsh (even fatal). The animal will, perhaps, become a parent herself, and must have all the knowledge and skills to raise the next generation. Adolescence is the transition between the safe practice of childhood and the independent, butt-on-the-line reality of adulthood. Adolescence is the time when "Because I said so" simply isn't good enough anymore -- Nature *demands* that they test boundaries and consequences and decide for themselves what decisions they want to make. It's not dominance or rebellion. It's growing up

And given the Mirriam was negligent in provided supporting links I take that task on for her.

Doggie manipulation
WHY NOT TAKE CANDY FROM A BABY? (If he lets you!)
Examines manipulation as part of social life, and the dog's need for clear boundaries & leadership.

"essence of the Basset!"
Hard to Train?

Chasing the cat, counter surfing fall under the general behavioral problems of dogs being dogs. Especial scent hounts that were bred to chase and track small game. ie, food, their next meal. When going against instictual behaviors one needs to be realistic in how much they can actual change the behavior.

Instinctive drift
the tendency of an organism to revert to instinctive behaviors that can interfere with the conditioned response. The concept originated with B. F. Skinner's former students Keller and Marian Breland. :
That the tendency of instinctive behavior to effect learned ones.

Instinctive Drift Bob Bailey
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
932 Posts
We have a doggie exclusion gate with a cat sized door in it. You can find them in catalogs. All kitty necessities are kept behind it. The dogs and cats themselves get along fine, but the bassets do have a taste for "kitty roca". Ewwww. Actually, the cats torment the dogs more than the other way 'round.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Does anyone else do the "turn the litterbox around" thing? That could be genius.

For the jumping up, in puppy class, we were taught to either pop your knee out just a little so that it pushes them away, not kick them, but just a nudge, or to reach down and take their paws in your hands. Harriet didn't mind the paws in the hands thing, but the knee thing has been helpful.

Good luck. We've been dreading that adolescence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Even though we have only had our little guy for two weeks, he and the cat get along great. We had the cat with out last dog, so he wasn't surprised by the beast bugging him bow. The cat (he is in the picture I posted earlier)actually sat on my lap with the puppy and let the puppy lick his ear clean. It was hysterical! The cat did, however, bit the puppy one day for biting the ankle. A task I wish I could do, but my teeth are not sharp enough to make the point!

One day I will figure out how to add pictures to these posts, but for now, Nitro's pictures are in my profile, along with the cat Zig
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
878 Posts
Lottie, one of our Bassets steals food that we think is far enough back on the worktops but that's our fault as much as hers! She's had a couple of dozen eggs, numerous apples, two lbs of Lurpak butter that I was going to make a fruit cake with, a couple of tubs of I Can't Believe It's Not Butter, raw mince, sausages, scotch eggs and we have caught her playing with nectarines and satsumas in the garden as if they are balls (she loves balls and toys)!


You should keep the stair gate on, becauses Bassets shouldn't be going up and down stairs as it's bad for their joints... too much weight on those little legs on the way down the stairs!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
I have a 10 month old she would jump up in her thrilled to see ya pet me now way. She started this later then most but we broke it very easily. She knows how to sit and the second she would go to jump we would step away either to the left or right cross our arms and turn our backs on her, telling her NO JUMP. They don't like to be ignored and turning your back makes them walk around to the front of you, then we would command the sit and once butt was completely on the floor pet and praise. If she would start to stand up, lay down or roll on her back the hand is immediately withdrawn until she is back in the sitting position. She now knows in order to be petted when my humans are standing up she must sit nicely. It is great when company comes too as she minds her manners nicely for attention. That was a simple issue to break.

As for the cat food no way a basset hound is completely ruled by their nose and food of any kind on their level is their food, it's that simple.

The wisteria is a problem as plants can't be poisonous and next time you may not be so lucky.

It's very important to continue the daily training sessions keeping it short and fun, if she likes toys teach her to stay and wait for the command of ok to retrieve a toy. Take her fav toy and have her stay while someone takes it and hides it and then have her find it. Keep her challenged and exercised for happiness. I am lucky in that I have a 5 year old lab who keeps her worn out inside and a 4 year old basset who wears her out running around outside. It's been great, my lab probably does 100 trick plus hand signals whole 9 yards I love to train. My bassets I expect the basics out of them but don't expect anything to elaborate they will just look at me like are you crazy I don't wanna. So, don't compare the 2 breeds I have had bassets and labs together at the same time for over 23 years and there is no comparison nor is it fair to even try. I love both breeds for their characteristics and the bassets keep us laughing.

The cat I suspect is making a game out of it too, if you have the steps gated off and the cat has the option to be a part of or separate then the cat is choosing to make it's presence in the room. I wouldn't make too big of a deal out of it, they will work it out.

Hang in there this too shall pass and you will have a wonderful dog.

Bo =o)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,042 Posts
My bassets I expect the basics out of them but don't expect anything to elaborate they will just look at me like are you crazy I don't wanna. So, don't compare the 2 breeds I have had bassets and labs together at the same time for over 23 years and there is no comparison nor is it fair to even try.
While I agree that the two breeds are very different, don't sell the bassets short in the trick department. In addition to the obedience, agility and rally exercises, SallyAnne had about 20 tricks under her belt, from the simple classics like shake a paw, wave, high five, sit up/beg, and speak to more advanced ones like weaving between my legs and heeling backwards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Mine do all those simple tricks as well, to me those are basics I don't do the weaving or the heeling backwards, as I said my lab does a 100 plus, things like pointing your finger pretending to shoot him and he will drop and lay over playing dead dog, he gives eskimo kisses and I even taught him butterfly kisses, try those with a basset they aren't going to translate. Eskimo kisses require a massive tongue kiss from a basset, lol

Don't misunderstand me here I absolutely love this breed our home will never be without a basset and hubby is just as nuts as I am. I just know how a lab owner going to a basset might easily get frustrated when trying to train a basset. I have owned the lab basset combination for 23 years and have had 5 basset hounds.

Bo =o)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,042 Posts
things like pointing your finger pretending to shoot him and he will drop and lay over playing dead dog
Watson used to do that. If he was a real turd in the obedience ring sometimes I would "shoot" him and walk out and leave him there. At least it was good for a laugh.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,378 Posts
"things like pointing your finger pretending to shoot him and he will drop and lay over playing dead dog
Watson used to do that. If he was a real turd in the obedience ring sometimes I would "shoot" him and walk out and leave him there. At least it was good for a laugh."
:D:D:D I love it. Why am I wasting time on buffing up scent discrimination, when I could teach Bella something I could actually use? :)
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top