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So, I've been in Animal Control for nearly 12 yrs. (Mostly as a Humane Investigator) Most of my rescue and shelter friwnds are hardcore adopt only/ no such thing as a responsible breeder stereotype. They distinctively disagree with my philosophy of if you are looking for a dog for companionship encouraging adoption (but not trying to force it) and then if you can't find what you are looking for through adoption then there is nothing wrong with looking for a responsible breeder. I was chastised very much for following my own advice. I have been looking for a young basset puppy through rescues but have been unable to find one. So, I that's when I searched and found my little Fenway. I feel no guilt in buying a dog. It's a shame that people try to make you feel you should be punished into considering adoption only because of other's irresponsibility. I also dislike how the term "responsible" breeder is overused. Most people that call themselves that aren't. If the hardcore rescue only groups would do a little research they would see that the truly responsible breeders are really in some cases even more strict then the rescues themselves in screening and finding forever homes for their puppies. Thanks for listening to my vent :)

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Most of the people involved in rescue nowadays either forgot or never knew that rescue was started by *breeders* who loved their breed and wanted to give back. I used to rescue before it became the "in" thing, we did it with our own resources, before rescue groups, before waddles, before fundraising, before Petfinder, before cross-country transport, without websites, just on our own one or a few dogs at a time. Even now many breeders support rescue, with both time and money, fostering and doing other things, yet many in rescue will turn their backs on us and throw us under the bus. I think if I do get back into it I won't be with the groups, I'll do it like I used to, on my own one hound at a time.
 

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all of our dogs have been rescues. beagles first and now the bassets.

We were fortunate to have contact with a very good regional basset rescue. Their screening process is rigid and they are advocates for the breed.

We are big on rescues.

That said, we are currently searching for another basset and we were almost taken in by a very non-reputable breeder.

I think of myself as pretty savvy especially after being involved in this forum but I was almost taken in by a very bad breeder.

I sought out advice from Soundtrack and thanks to her I am headed in the right direction (and now have a better understanding of how to weed out the bad ones).

We hope to have a puppy soon from a breeder.

I have great respect for the good breeders; without them the basset would not be the basset
 

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We got Piper from an RSPCA shelter and she was chosen for us. We had gone round and round trying to find a dog that was right for us and couldn't see one. They spoke to us about what we wanted and matched Piper to us. I have to say she has been a perfect fit. Charlie however was bought from a breeder, he was an accidental breeding and was the only dog in the litter. Is he the perfect specimen of basset hound? Probably not, but we only wanted him to become part of the family, we didn't want his papers. We were very careful about the breeders we chose and did not one that seem to farm out bassets every few weeks. There was one in particular near us, that seemed to have a constant steam of basset pups. Charlie has slotted right in and I think he too is a perfect fit for us. I don't think it matters which way you go, you have to find a dog that is right for you and your family.
 

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Just as some breeders are honorable and others are not same goes for Rescues as well. Many with a constant supply of puppies are being fed by puppymill from outside the us etc. Many rescues are run as a mean of developing income for the owner/ceo/president rather than the best interest of dogs in mind. One need to be just a diligent selecting a rescue as they are a breeder.

One-fourth of new animal hoarding cases involve rescuers, ASPCA expert says | L.A. Unleashed | Los Angeles Times

The Phenomenon called ?Retail Rescue? | Animal Law Update

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I agree. One should be diligent in finding a reputable rescue just as they would a reputable breeder. Two examples that I can think of is one of (at the the time) most "reptutable rescues in my area was investigated due to a complaint by former volunteers. I served a warrent at the home of the president of the rescue. We ended up seizing nearly 70 "rescues" that were in poor health crated throughout the home. Turns out that the "donations" were not going to proper care for the dogs. On the other side, I had a case where I investigated a "reputable" breeder. I ended up seizing almost 30 dogs and several puppies. The puppies were all immaculate. The breeder dogs however, were in horrid conditions. My little max is my souvenir from that. I never liked long hair dogs that I have to constantly cut, but he took to me so I had took to him. I don't regret it a bit. I always believe in rescue first, if you are looking for a companion dog. I believe shelter dogs make awesome pets. In the same token I certainly don't fault anyone who feels otherwise or can't find whst they want in rescue and decides to look elsewhere. Either way, you should be vigilant of wherever or whomever you get your dog from :)
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Here's my thing, I think everyone should look at rescuing before shopping through a breeder. I mean, why not give it a shot? That being said if you don't see a dog for you, then I don't see why you shouldn't purchase a puppy through a trusted breeder. Besides that not everyone is ready for the very real challenges that come with a rescue baby. My Joplin, for example, is very defensive with other animals and if you raise a hand to pet her she will sometimes cry and and squint her eyes hard. She's one of the best case scenarios too. Many require daily eye drops, can't control their bathroom urges, et cetera. It's tough, truly. But many of you know that. I don't think everyone has the time or patience for a rescue, furthermore many rescue dogs aren't compatible with a family.
All in all, I think everyone should make that decision on their own. Sure, others can criticize you, but they're not the ones raising that hound so what difference do their rude comments make?
 

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Rescue or from a reputable breeder?

This is a very involved subject in my opinion. As a breeder, apart from a couple we imported - from people I knew already (in the UK), until recently all our puppies we bred ourselves. In truth, I hadn't really appreciated quite what a minefield it actually is (now?) out there. And in that, I have every sympathy with people trying to identify what IS a 'reputable' breeder!!! At the time our line was ending, I decided to switch breeds to something lighter and taller - it's far from Bassets who have bad backs!! I managed to locate what I'm able to say was a reputable breeder, reasonably locally too and apart from her flying ears, which I don't like (for showing), she's been a super little dog. Once through the zoomies. Her breeder has always been there for me - even if she's now living in Brittany which move was a bit of a curve ball as I was relying on her being able to take Teazel back, should that be needed. She has said she'd still come over to collect her however. The first Whippet breeder we visited had me running .... I don't think I've ever been handed a puppy I didn't know how to take into my arms before. This poor little mite was a disaster. And I overheard her telling somebody on the phone (when we arrived) she was a KC Accredited Breeder - untrue!

On the other hand, having realised I had to have a Basset in the house, after our last one died, I bought 4 month, at the time, Frankie from a breeder I'd known ever since I started in the breed back in 1972. He came to us with Giardia, roundwork eggs (fecal) and at under a year, had needed front to back x-raying because he was lame. I'd gone to Pano which it wasn't, but it was premature closure of the growth plates, ulna, both sides. I have my own theories about how this happened and indeed it's not unknown in the breed BUT bearing in mind how much all this was costing, at under a year, I did invite his breeder to help me with the costs! She send me a rather derisory sum, but I guess it was something. I am still friends with her!! But whether others would see her as a 'reputable breeder', I'm not so sure really.

Suffice to say apart from the fact all puppies, whatever the source, need good homes, the bottom line is the buyers must always do their homework, and if something doesn't feel right, it's probably not right.

Personally, and I am a Home checker for a couple of Shelters so I do see 'both sides', I prefer to buy a puppy with a 'clean slate' which tends to rule out adopting from a Shelter. How to find a reputable breeder remains something of a lottery though. Reputation - word of mouth? Take somebody knowledgeable with you when buying from a breeder?

Just don't jump at the first puppy you see!!!! And again if it doesn't feel right, walk away.
 

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Franksmom it is probably more of mine field than you realize many rescues at least here in the US are nothing more than non profit pet stores importing dogs from foreign breeder and sources So one needs to research a rescue organization as much if not more so than one would do for breeder
 
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