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Discussion Starter #1
I've always had multiple dogs growing up. Akita's and a Dobie, Beagle and a Corgi, but I've never had 2 of the same breed let alone two pups at the same time.

My question is, Snoops is 11 weeks now and I've been thinking of getting another Basset with a hope they'd become friends. So what's a good age to introduce another dog? I've been looking at some female pups with perhaps a thought of maybe breeding some time down the road.

Any advice is appreciated.
Thanks
 

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If breeding is what you want to do, then I seriously suggest putting it aside and refraining from purchasing another dog until you have done considerably more research on the subject of RESPONSIBLE breeding.

Here are some sites to start you off:

http://learntobreed.com/
http://woodhavenlabs.com/breeding.html
http://www.dogplay.com/pagelist.html#BreedingandPlacingArticles
http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/5779498/so_you_want_to_be_a_dog_breeder.html?cat=9
http://www.21stcenturycares.org/qualbreed.htm


Plan on taking a couple of years to research the subject before buying a dog for that purpose.
 

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I agree with Soundtrack.

I'd strongly discourage breeding unless you are willing to take personal responsibility for each and every puppy you produce. We've got enough unwanted dogs in this country as it is. 1 in 4 homeless shelter dogs are purebred. There is certainly no shortage of dogs (unless you're looking for a rare breed, which you are not) so there is no need to add additional breeders other than to improve the breed through careful and selective breeding.

That being said I don't think there is a wrong age to introduce dogs. Dogs that are properly socialized and raised can welcome new pack members at any age as far as I know. Some senior dogs can get annoyed by energetic puppies, but you have a long way to go before you reach that point.
 

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I just got two 1.5 year old bassetts at the same time. Personally I think it's harder to train two at a time. I really feel like I would be able to teach alot of the basics easier one at a time...like walking on a leash for example. But I am by no means an expert in dog training.
 

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I should add that they do play and keep each other company and are generally cute and I don't regret getting them...but it's more work in some ways
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ok I understand everyone’s concern and need to discourage me, but No, breeding them is not what I want to do, at least not right now. I know I have too much to learn on the subject before doing that. It wasn't the focus of the post; actually I stated it as an afterthought, as it would be nice to leave the possibility open for some time down the road.

I do have Snoops scheduled to be neutered as I am not an irresponsible person and would never do anything like breeding dogs without proper planning and learning more about it, nor would I be an irresponsible breeder. As stated... the world has enough unwanted pets.

My main concern was giving Snoops a friend and companion because in my experience with dogs, two seem happier than one.

Since I’ve never had a pup as young as him, I was wondering if age mattered when introducing another dog? And would two males get along better than a female and male?

Thanks for the links, info and concern.
 

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My opinion is that it's better to get the one dog trained and settled before adding a second. Trying to train two dogs at once is a whole new ballgame. Your puppy is easy to manage now, but wait 'till adolescence hits!
 

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I think you are right, that they are happier with a friend. There is the possibility that the dogs won't get along, but in my experience the vast majority eventually will as long as they're given the opportunity to work out their pack dynamics. You will run into a problem if you have two dogs that both want to be the alpha but as long as you (or another human household member) are the clear pack leader you should be able to make it work.

My dogs had some rough patches for the first few months, but now they have become friends. They don't play with each other as they're both pretty old but they do sleep near each other. Our mutt who tends to have an alpha attitude actually protects our other dog when we go places which can sometimes cause problems. When another dog sniffs her, he growls at them. They didn't know each other until they were 9 and 8 years old, so I wouldn't worry about waiting too long.

I think dogs are more likely to dislike the same gender than the opposite. I have heard of a lot of female dogs not getting along with other female dogs and the same for males but I don't often hear of situations where a male and a female have problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thinking back.... remembering the crazy adolescence of my 145 lbs Akita (RIP Truck) I have to agree with you Soundtrack, better to get one trained first.

On the other hand I thought it would be better to bring another in early so they could work out their differences and grow up together. Which is why I was asking you all.

When I introduced my Dobie to the Akita, it didn't pan out too good at first, she was 7 and he was 8. Eventually they did become friends and grew old together but it took a long while. Sadly when she passed @ 13, he followed suit a year later. I was amazed he lived so long being so big, but that's irrelevant.

When I was kid my Father brought home our first Basset, Freckles. We later tried to introduce Charlie, another Basset, but the two did not like each other at all. After two weeks of trying my Father decided to return him. If I recall they were both about 3 years old.

Anyhow, those are some of the experiences I've had so I was curious. I appreciate the advice and replies.
 

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If the introduction isn't done correctly the existing dog will consider the new dog an intruder in his space. The shelter that we adopted Anabelle from had us bring our existing dog into the shelter for a meet and greet on neutral territory. Then when we got home, we took her inside first and had her spend a minute or two in each room in the house so that her smell was throughout the house. Then we brought our existing dog in. That seemed to work pretty well.
 
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