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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just a few questions for a newbie. Thanks in advance for helping out!!!

Here goes....

1. How do you know if your basset puppy is growing too fast? When I met Chloe yesterday for the first time she seemed so big for 9.5 wks. She is free fed but she is ribby and not chunky. She just seems long and quite solid. Not sure if this would make the difference but she is outside all day (fenced yard).

2. I have read that we need to limit excess exercise with bassets until they are atleast 1 yrs old. If I take my puppy for a walk, how long of a walk is considered okay?

3. Should walks outside be minimized until she has received her puppy vaccinations (2 more sets)? We have lots of dogs in the neighbourhood and not everyone is vigilant about scooping. :eek:

4. Is it normal for the chest of some bassets to protrude a lot? I saw Chloe's mom and noticed that her chest protruded quite a bit. I have never seen this on another basset before so wasn't sure if it was something to be concerned about.

Well...I think that is it for now. LOL!
 

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#1: my preference is not to free feed-- my basset puppy was also free fed by his breeder. when i got him, i put him on scheduled meals. Reason is because i had a dachshund before, who are like basset hounds-- they are chowhounds and tend to eat too much. He was free fed and ate too much and became overweight... a true sausage dog..!

#3. i would wait until vaccinations are done..
 

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With regards to #2, I haven't read to minimize exercise, but to limit stairs/climbing furniture, that sort of thing.

I haven't gotten my puppy yet (in 2 weeks!!) but our walks at first will just be around the block a couple times a day. Then working our way up to longer walks, depending on what he can handle and if the kids can handle it too. I am kind of scared about corralling the children more than the pup!
 

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#1 My Basset was also larger than I expected as a pup. I never had one before and didn't expect it, but he is fine according to the vet. My husband calls him "cement puppy". Bassets are so sturdy and solid!

#2 I didn't limit exercise. We walked around the block, but Owen would stop every so often and rest for the first few walks. Then he grew a bit and got used to the exercise and can go and go and go!

#3 I didn't let him sniff or mouth things on the ground. Eww.

#4 Sounds normal
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
#2 I didn't limit exercise. We walked around the block, but Owen would stop every so often and rest for the first few walks. Then he grew a bit and got used to the exercise and can go and go and go!
I get I should re-word this. I don't mean limit exercise but the length of it. I am assuming that around the block a couple of times a day is okay.

The reason I ask is because my DD plays soccer in the summer and we usually walk home from the field. It is a 30-40 mins walk (with the kiddos). Perhaps I should make room in the wagon for the basset? LOL!
 

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1. How do you know if your basset puppy is growing too fast?
body condition from Dog Diet Do's and Don’t's
According to Dr. Tony Buffington, Professor of Clinical Nutrition, Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine, your puppy can be fed a regimen of specific caloric intake compared to his body condition score (BCS), using a simple one to five scale, from overly thin to obese. Using manufacturer feeding recommendations as an initial starting point, feed your puppy to a score of two and maintain this weight until he's fully grown.

...2 = Thin - Ribs easily palpated and may be visible with no palpable fat. Tops of lumbar vertebrae visible. Pelvic bones less prominent. Obvious waist and abdominal tuck.



...3 = Moderate - Ribs palpable without excess fat covering. Abdomen tucked up when viewed from side
I have read that we need to limit excess exercise with bassets until they are atleast 1 yrs old. If I take my puppy for a walk, how long of a walk is considered okay?
advice from people that have no understand of the risks obese and the lack of muscle tone has and the importance of exercise in preventing joint and orthopedic condition,
The idea is to prevent tramatic damage but a lack of exercise can be just as damaging as the severest trauma. There is no number that can be put on it it is a matter of common sense and the fitness level and conditioning of the puppy up to that point.

UNILATERAL HIP DYSPLASIA
Over the years, our observations of the kennel populations of giant breeds and their siblings living in private homes have led to the conclusion that there is no such thing as congenital unilateral hip dysplasia, but only acquired unilateral hip dysplasia. The kennel dogs, whose exercise opportunities are maximized, with several dogs of a similar age free to run and play all day and night in large paddocks, show us some interesting things.
  • They grow much more slowly, because much of their food intake goes into play and running.
  • They rarely (almost never) suffer an injury.
  • They always have symmetrical hip sockets, even if they are very shallow.
Their litter mates in private homes, where exercise is confined to an hour or two of intense play or jogging when their owners return from work, provide us with a different set of observations.
  • They grow very large, very fast.
  • They often suffer injury.
  • They frequently have hip sockets of different depths.
The implications of these observations are enormous, but very simple to understand. These large breeds grow much too quickly for their biology to keep up. They frequently show some degree of clinical rickets with some bowing of the forelegs, and have large soft joints due to the inability of the body to deposit calcium in the bone at a rate equal to the rate of growth.
Exercise in Puppies-Are there rules?
This is an especially pertinent question for owners of large breed puppies, since these breeds have a higher incidence than others of developmental orthopedic disorders such as hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, and cartilage abnormalities known as osteochondrosis dissecans (OCD). As is all too often the case, however, these opinions generally lack solid scientific evidence to support them. Very little is known about the precise risks and benefits of different types and intensities of exercise in growing animals.

...
There are many more studies on the effects of exercise in children than in puppies, and though it is always risky to extrapolate from one species to another, some useful information can be gained by using one organism as a model for another, as long as conclusions drawn in this way are cautious and tentative pending better data. In general, while some intense and repetitive exercise can pose a risk of damage to growth plates in children, exercise is overall seen as beneficial in improving bone density and reducing the risk of obesity and related health problems.
The research evidence, then, really does not provide anything like a definitive answer to questions about the effects of exercise in growing puppies. Common sense suggests that forcing a dog to exercise heavily when it does not wish to is not a good idea. Likewise, puppies sometimes have more enthusiasm than sense and can exercise to the point of heat exhaustion, blistered footpads, and other damage that may be less obvious. Therefore, a general principle of avoiding forced or voluntary extreme exercise is reasonable, but specific and absolute statements about what kind of exercise is allowed, what surfaces puppies should or should not exercise on, and so forth is merely opinion not supported by objective data. Such opinions may very well be informed by personal experience, and they may be reliable, but any opinion not founded on objective data must always be taken with a grain of salt and accepted provisionally until such data is available.
Be reasonable don't force the dog and slowly build up conditioning. THat is don't expect the dog to do a 10 mile hike without working up to it. also keep the developmental stage if the puppy in mind as well a 3 month old is the equivelent of a human toddler, a six month old is an 12-13 year old adolescent. Obviously the potential to do harm from over exersise or trauma is much greater the younger the dog is. As the dog gets older growth rate decreases and the growrh plates begin to close. It a matter of using common sense and moderation not overdoing it but at the same time you need to let the puppy be able to run around and get tired as well


3. Should walks outside be minimized until she has received her puppy vaccinations (2 more sets)?
absolutely and postively no
Position Statement on Puppy Socialization
American Veterinary Society of Animal behavior
The primary and mostimportanttime for puppy socialization is the first three months of life.1, 2 During this time puppies should be exposed to as many new people, animals, stimuli and environments as can be achieved safely and without causing overstimulation manifested as excessive fear, withdrawal or avoidance behavior. For this reason, the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior believes that it should be the standard of care for puppies to receive such socialization before they are fully vaccinated.


Because the first three months are the period when sociability outweighs fear, this is the primary window of opportunity for puppies to adapt to new people animals, and experiences. Incomplete or improper socialization during this important time can increase the risk of behavioral problems later in life including fear, avoidance, and/or aggression. Behavioral problems are the greatest threat to the owner-dog bond. In fact, behavioral problems are the number one cause of relinquishment to shelters.3 Behavioral issues, not infectious diseases, are the number one cause of death for dogs under 3 years of age.
Puppy Socialisation and Habituation (Part 1) Why is it Necessary?

Puppy Socialisation and Habituation (Part 2) How to go about it

Is it normal for the chest of some bassets to protrude a lot?
the breed standard call for "The chest is deep and full with prominent sternum showing clearly in front of the legs." Now if you are talking about a rib or multiple ribs protruding out the side etc that is a serious fault but not that uncommon.
 

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we all have big chests


(she human says, "LUCKY")


LOLOLOL!

Boomer has a prominent chest; my mother-in-law asked if that was normal, also the "protrusion" on his head. I told her they were.
 

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I think that head "extrusion" is so that when they run into stuff they don't see because their nose is buried on a scent, they won't hurt themselves.
 

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I call Rosco's protrusion "The Lip Breaker". I have been on the receiving end of many fat lips because of a "gentle" toss of his head. He's also given my mom a black eye with it. I call him "Knot Head" too.
 

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I call Rosco's protrusion "The Lip Breaker". I have been on the receiving end of many fat lips because of a "gentle" toss of his head. He's also given my mom a black eye with it. I call him "Knot Head" too.

Ooooh, ouch! Makes me hurt thinkin' about it.
 
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