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Discussion Starter #1
What is a healthy weight for basset?

(Daisy Mae isn't a squishy sexy basset like all the others I've seen. She looks under weight to me. She weighs 42 lbs and is a year old.)

Do bassets/dogs get all of their teeth at one time, or do they have a set of molars come in later in life?

(My girl has recently (within the past 2 weeks) started chewing her chew bone roughly again. More towards the back of the jawline though.)

Any help/thoughts/comments would be appreciated...

:confused:Worried Mama:confused:
 

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Anywhere between 35 and 90 pounds ;)
Really, there is a lot of variation in Basset size so you can't say they should be a specific weight. But there are body condition charts you can compare her to, or ask your vet if her condition is good.
FWIW, younger, immature dogs tend to weigh less than older ones.
 

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usually start growing "out" not "up" as the get older, as soundtrack stated. lulu was 60lbs at one point. i've got a much smaller frame and am a svelt 35
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Daisy Mae is a very fit young lady. I was just a little worried, but now I'm not! Thanks!
 

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bassets/dogs get all of their teeth at one time, or do they have a set of molars come in later in life?
all dogs get the last set of molars sort of like wisdom teeth later in ~ 8-10 month of age which is associated with a second chewing phase.


Far healthier for a dog to be a little under weight than a little over. Keep in mind experts estimate 50% or higher the percentage of dog in the US that are overweight. This tends to shew what people thingt is an ideal weight. In studies even when using a body condition chart most owners tend to signifcantly underestimate how overwight their dog is

see Corpulent Canine
I have assessed the weight on hundreds of dogs of a variety of breeds over the past year at seminars all over the country and a conservative estimate is that about 50% of the dogs that I see are overweight; approximately 25% are actually obese. These are not couch potato dogs. These are dogs whose owners expect them to jump in obedience, to run over rough ground in retrieving tests, and to perform in agility. And we are seeing the sad results: ruptured anterior cruciate ligaments (often both legs), severe degenerative arthritis in dogs in their prime, degenerative disk disease, and many more conditions that are caused by, or exacerbated by, excess weight.

...I have assessed the weight on hundreds of dogs of a variety of breeds over the past year at seminars all over the country and a conservative estimate is that about 50% of the dogs that I see are overweight; approximately 25% are actually obese. These are not couch potato dogs. These are dogs whose owners expect them to jump in obedience, to run over rough ground in retrieving tests, and to perform in agility. And we are seeing the sad results: ruptured anterior cruciate ligaments (often both legs), severe degenerative arthritis in dogs in their prime, degenerative disk disease, and many more conditions that are caused by, or exacerbated by, excess weight.

...People don't know how to determine the correct weight for their dogs. Dogs vary in height, bone structure, and muscularity, so there is no one correct weight for a dog of any given breed. The best way to determine whether a dog is overweight is to test 3 different parts of the body: the neck, the ribs, and the hips.


  1. <LI type=a>To check the neck, press your thumb and index finger deep into the side of the neck just ahead of the shoulder, and pinch them together. If your fingers are more than 1/2" apart, the dog is overweight. (Note: this is where old dogs tend to carry most of their excess fat, and they may actually be thin in other locations.) <LI type=a>To check the ribs, stand with your dog beside you, facing his butt. Place your thumb on the middle of his spine half way down the back and spread your fingers out over his last few ribs. Then run your fingers up and down along his skin. You should be able to feel the bumps of his ribs without pressing in.
  2. To check the hips, run your hand over your dog's croup. You should be able to feel the bumps of his two pelvic bones without pressing down.
Some of you may be reading this and thinking, "I would never want my dog to be that skinny!" Think about the Olympic athletes. If you want your dog to be an athlete then it is only fair that you do what you can to help him achieve the body that he will need to perform and stay healthy and injury free for many years.
Dog Diet do's ands don't's

Ralston Purina Dog Obesity Study
In the first-ever lifelong canine diet restriction study, Purina researchers have proven that a dog’s median life span can be extended by 15 percent – nearly two years for the Labrador Retrievers in the study – by feeding to ideal body condition through diet restriction.
Nestlé Purina study confirms link between body fat, certain health Conditions


For some reason it is often believed one should not be able to see a dog ribs with a short coated dog the is not true under certain light condition and the position of the dog you should see the rib if you never can see the ribs is a pretty good indication the dog is over weight,
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you for the information! That was all very helpful!!! I am a very scienced based person. I work in the medical field and love explaination, not just "she's a good weight". She isn't over weight at all, but going by this she is a perfect weight! :-D
 
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