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Old 04-24-2018, 04:56 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Hi!

I have a 9 and a half month old basset who is so unbelievably loving, however he gets so excited about children (especially if they are on scooters!!) that he will often jump / bounce / lunge / somersault at them to play as we walk past them on the street.

I can expect this being quite scary for the child, so is not something that I want to become a habit.

I just wanted to know if anyone else has experienced this, and if so what would their advice be? Is it just my pup being a pup who will grow out of this?

Thanks in advance!
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Old 04-25-2018, 03:49 AM   #2 (permalink)
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This isn't anything I've experienced with any of mine bukt if they had, it would be stopped!! Training. I'd not want a puppy of this age doing 'somersaults', not that I'd imagine they would/could.
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Old 04-25-2018, 08:12 AM   #3 (permalink)
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This has only been happening for a week or so, so if any If anyone has witnessed this before, or has specific advice on how to specifically tackle this issue, that would be much appreciated.
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Old 04-25-2018, 10:17 AM   #4 (permalink)
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1. normal dog behavior. (that is for dogs not scared of children)

2. with age the dog may become less exuberant but the behavior will not get better with age on its own

3. You have 3 things going on. barrier frustration. (dog on end of leash not able to get were wants to go) lack of self control / reactive dog, untrained, dog not trained an appropriate greeting behavior, you ultimately need to deal with all three separately and together. but in situations that do not illicit such a strong response.



Self control see


https://suzanneclothier.com/article/...-self-control/

https://www.boulderhumane.org/sites/...Relaxation.pdf

https://player.fm/series/animal-trai...-reactive-dogs


https://www.cleanrun.com/index.cfm/p...-unleashed.htm



Greeting behavior

ClickerSolutions Training Treasures -- Quick Fix for a Jumping Dog

ClickerSolutions Training Articles -- Using Circles to Regain Lost Attention

ClickerSolutions Training Treasures -- Stopping Negative Behavior Positively
Quote:
"Changing undesired behavior
The first step in changing undesired behavior is to identify the behaviors that you want to change. Every time you interact with your dog, ask yourself, "Is my dog doing something I want him to do?"

The second step is to define what you want your dog to do. If your dog is doing something you don't like, define what you want him to do instead. It's not enough to say "I want him to stop doing what he's doing." He could stop doing what he's doing and choose to do something worse - and then you'd have to stop that as well. It's faster to define what you want him to do from the beginning. For example:

I want my dog to hold a sit-stay while I prepare his food. (Not "I want my dog to stop jumping on me when I prepare his food.")
I want my dog to sit at the top or bottom of the stairs when a person is walking up or down.
I want my dog to lie quietly on a mat while the family eats dinner.
I want my dog to lie quietly on a mat when I have visitors.
The third step is to manage the situation so your dog can't do the behavior that he was doing instead of the preferred behavior. The dog was doing the undesired behavior because it worked, because it was somehow reinforcing.

For example, a dog jumps on someone as a greeting, even if the person yells and pushes him away. Why? Because the dog wants attention. If he doesn't jump, he was likely ignored. So he jumps, even if he is yelled at for it. Until you can teach your dog that jumping isn't reinforcing but sitting politely is, manage the situation by putting him in another room when the doorbell rings.

The final step is to train a preferred behavior. If you make the new behavior reinforcing and simultaneously make the old behavior unrewarding, the dog will quickly choose to do the new behavior.
barrier fustration

https://suzanneclothier.com/article/...story-harry-t/

https://suzanneclothier.com/article/...ad-aggression/

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/sarah..._11799320.html

https://positively.com/victorias-blo...-reactive-dog/

https://www.amazon.com/Feisty-Fido-H.../dp/1891767070
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Old 04-25-2018, 11:16 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Thank you so much for your thorough response Mikey T.
From reading the articles it does sound like this is a case of Barrier Frustration.

We have completed group puppy training and are due to start 1-1 training next month, so these articles will come in very handy for now.
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Old 04-25-2018, 12:27 PM   #6 (permalink)
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My boys, Buford and Cletus, act atrociously when outside on a leash, particularly when they see other dogs. I started engaging on a counter intuitive action, give them a treat right when they start acting like that.

Took some time, but they eventually associate an event that they go bonkers on with a treat. Cletus doesn't even wait for me to say "come here", he now sees an event that used to trigger him and comes to me for a treat. Buford is more stubborn though, it only works about 25% of the time. I need to find a better treat.

Anyway, I've always read the best way to communicate with a basset is through their stomach. I found this to be very true 99% of the time.
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Old 04-25-2018, 04:19 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Took some time, but they eventually associate an event that they go bonkers on with a treat.
Cassical Conditioning. ie Pavlov dogs salivating when a bell is rung. It is standard procedure when counter conditioning and desensitizing. The one thing is to prevent "operant conditioning" from occuring that is the dog believes its behavior is the cause of the reward. Is to do such training "below Threshold" that is in this case start with the treat when another dog approaches but before the dog starts going nuts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=D9I1vir3xyg

Counter Classical or Counter Operant?
Quote:
So, to be clear, Classical Conditioning has nothing to do with training a particular behavior. It is a way of linking and emotion with a stimulus (bell = feel good like you do when you smell food, or “Her getting her keys makes me happy cuz when she does I’ll get LIVER!). Operant Conditioning is about reinforcing a behavior (“If I sit and stay I’ll get LIVER!).


https://suzanneclothier.com/article/...under-or-over/

https://suzanneclothier.com/videos/t...holds-nothing/
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Old 04-26-2018, 07:32 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikey T View Post
Cassical Conditioning. ie Pavlov dogs salivating when a bell is rung. It is standard procedure when counter conditioning and desensitizing. The one thing is to prevent "operant conditioning" from occuring that is the dog believes its behavior is the cause of the reward. Is to do such training "below Threshold" that is in this case start with the treat when another dog approaches but before the dog starts going nuts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=D9I1vir3xyg

Counter Classical or Counter Operant?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmBspuMgMdM

https://suzanneclothier.com/article/...under-or-over/

https://suzanneclothier.com/videos/t...holds-nothing/
I only brought it up as it was a counter-intuitive effort to me. I would have never thought on my own to "condition" the dogs in this manner. I've had some success and thus have no problem letting other people in on this concept.
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