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Old 06-17-2017, 05:43 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default My Bassett puppy is full of energy!

Meet Hudson the 15 week old Bassett. He is a lively tempered dog who is friendly to everyone and seeing him interact with dogs he is very submissive and playful. Training has also gone really well with him, we managed to teach him sit, down, play dead, roll over, paw (both) and finish. Each morning my partner takes him for a walk before work and trains him too.

The problem is we've been told because he has soft bones right now and they are delicate we can't walk him far and only once a day max 15mins. So how do we get him tired?

Some mornings he refuses to go out and will just sit in the field and look at my husband so he takes him back and he is full of energy (still refusing to go out). We play tuggy which helps.

Other days he could go for ages, running around, sniffing, walking he loves it but we're concious we shouldn't do it for long.

Currently we get up at 6am then walk/ play and train him for an hour then it's breakfast and time to calm down. He usually fine here. We leave the house at 8am for work and then my partner comes back at 1pm for a 2hour lunch, he feeds him and plays again.

In the evening we get home at 5.30pm and depending if he went for a walk in the morning we take him out for a little walk and then feed him at 7pm. His bedtime(crate) is at 9.30-10.

We find he can be really restless going to bed and won't settle, also at weekends he doesn't want to sleep and I think it's because we are there. Walks really tire him out but as I say we've been told not to walk him so much at his age.

What does everyone else walk wise for a puppy? Is there any alternative to make him tired?

Thanks!

Also, we are crate training him and he is doing well. We barely have any accidents in the morning.



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Old 06-17-2017, 07:06 AM   #2 (permalink)
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I'd suggest that a big part of all this is the length of time you are leaving him on his own. When you ARE home, he's bound to be excited and lively. This, as far as I'm concerned, isn't a breed who enjoys living a solitary life - and eventually this will be bound to develop into noise, destruction and one very unhappy hound. You may have to consider getting him into a daycare centre so he has the attention hounds crave.

The norm for the breed is only free running around up to 6 months after which more organised exercise can begin. It would depend on whether you have a heavy boned type because for sure, if you overdo at a young age, by the time he's a year, when he should still be sound and ready to do as little, or as much as you can provide, he may well have an injury. The muscles have to be built up gradually to support all the heavy bone.

You should have been warned by his breeder about stairs (especially coming down) while young, and jumping on and off furniture. Again this should be prevented so he reaches a year, still sound. I'm wondering about the height of that bed he's on in the photo.
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Old 06-17-2017, 12:06 PM   #3 (permalink)
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He is so cute!
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Old 06-18-2017, 03:24 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Hi, that isn't his bed it was the sofa which he doesn't usually go on, the breeder warned about stairs and furniture which he doesn't do and we've trained him to not go upstairs. Max time he is alone is 5hours and when we come back he hasn't had any accidents or destroyed anything and is also just waking up. My partner works part time so fri-sun we are home all day so I don't think this is the case. And as I said my partner then has a 2hour lunch then is back at work for 2.5hours then back home. He is also fine in the morning and afternoon as mentioned it's in the evening he is full of beans even sometimes after a walk but we are concious we can't walk him and play with him and 15mins doesn't seem enough.

Also at the beginning I said lively puppy I meant lovely.

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Old 06-18-2017, 07:08 PM   #5 (permalink)
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[quote]
The problem is we've been told because he has soft bones right now and they are delicate we can't walk him far and only once a day max 15mins. So how do we get him tired?
complete BS on limit on exercise. There is no scientific basis for this recommendation. see How Much Exercise Is Too Much for a Puppy?
[/ quote]

"For more insight, I contacted Dr. Marc Wosar, MSpVM, DACVS, an orthopedic specialist and faculty member of AOVet, an international organization that promotes research and education on musculoskeletal disorders in animals.

"Unfortunately, there are no hard and fast rules in these cases," Dr. Wosar says. "It's actually a big issue for our equine colleagues who have to deal with these issues all the time when it comes to training racehorses and other equine athletes."


"On the one hand, we know wolf pups run with their packs for miles. On the other, we know that the risks for a sedentary puppy with a weekend-warrior exercise pattern are worse than for a puppy that gets continuous, self-regulated exercise," Dr. Wosar says."
{
..."To my{Dr. Patty Khuly VMD} way of seeing things, it all comes down to common sense. In the absence of any hard and fast rules, caution makes sense, but attention to the positives of exercise — even what some may consider a great deal of it — deserves more than its current role as mere afterthought in this debate.

After all, given the sad state of pet obesity in this country and the legions of pets laboring under its weight, I can’t help but think the question should be less about the theoretical “How much is too much?” and more about the rock-solid knowledge that too little exercise over a lifetime can kill"

Exercise in Puppies-Are there rules? | The SkeptVet
"One case control observational study [1] surveyed dog owners and found playing with other dogs to be a risk factor for OCD. Another, similar study [2] found chasing balls and sticks was a risk factor for development of hip dysplasia and elbow abnormalities. However, these studies cannot answer the overall question, which is how much and what kinds of exercise pose how great a risk and provide how great a benefit. One study [3] found exercise to be part of the treatment of carpal laxity, another joint abnormality seen in large breed puppies, and there is no question that exercise has many benefits, including reducing the risk of obesity and simply being part of a normal, enjoyable life for a puppy.

In general, while some intense and repetitive exercise can pose a risk of damage to growth plates in children, exercise is overall seen as beneficial in improving bone density and reducing the risk of obesity and related health problems.
The research evidence, then, really does not provide anything like a definitive answer to questions about the effects of exercise in growing puppies.
Common sense suggests that forcing a dog to exercise heavily when it does not wish to is not a good idea. Likewise, puppies sometimes have more enthusiasm than sense and can exercise to the point of heat exhaustion, blistered footpads, and other damage that may be less obvious. Therefore, a general principle of avoiding forced or voluntary extreme exercise is reasonable, but specific and absolute statements about what kind of exercise is allowed, what surfaces puppies should or should not exercise on, and so forth is merely opinion not supported by objective data. Such opinions may very well be informed by personal experience, and they may be reliable, but any opinion not founded on objective data must always be taken with a grain of salt and accepted provisionally until such data is available.
"

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Old 06-18-2017, 07:18 PM   #6 (permalink)
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"Meet Hudson the 15 week old Bassett."

FWIW a pet peeve of many on this forum is misspelling basset only one t in the breed name.
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Old 06-19-2017, 03:36 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikey T View Post
"Meet Hudson the 15 week old Bassett."

FWIW a pet peeve of many on this forum is misspelling basset only one t in the breed name.
Haha! That's spell check for u! Thanks for the info but I'm wondering if there's info out there more specific to the breed. It would be interesting to get more opinions

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Old 06-21-2017, 10:49 AM   #8 (permalink)
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"but I'm wondering if there's info out there more specific to the breed."

no facts, lots of opinions.
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Old 06-23-2017, 04:53 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Again most experienced breeders of BASSETS will recommend no 'organised walks' (meaning on a hard surface) for the first 6 months - just allowing, within reason, ambling around in a confined area. After 6 months, gradually up the road work (and I do mean gradually if you have a heavy boned sort) to help muscles develop as they should to support the heavy bone. If it's all gone to plan, and the hound is still sound by a year, then he should be good to go - as much and as little as you can give him. And again, this is not a breed that's totally happy to be spending long hours alone so if this is the case with your Basset, he's almost bound to be full of it when you are home with him. He doesn't know when it's the weekend and you need a lie in!!

Last edited by FranksMum; 06-29-2017 at 04:47 AM. Reason: Typo noticed.
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