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Old 11-19-2016, 08:04 PM   #1 (permalink)
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hey everyone, my basset hound is 7 weeks old and i was wondering how many times a day i should feed him and what serving size?
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Old 11-21-2016, 11:39 AM   #2 (permalink)
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3-4 times a day


there is no standard serving size as the amount required is contingent on caloric content of the dog food which varies greatly and the metabolism and the size of the dog. On puppy food there is chart how much to feed by weight and age of the dog. This is per day I recommend taking the minimium about reducing a further 20% and divide by the number of meals a day. Basset have the highest bone mass of any breed.. Bone requires little nutrition so in general you feed a basset the same amount as another breed of the same weight it is going be overweight.

You need to adjust the amount you feed every week based on the dogs body condition. If too fat reduce the amount if too thin increase it. https://oregonvma.org/files/Purina-D...tion-Chart.pdf

t0 prevent joint and growth problems it is best to keep a puppy on the thin side.
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Old 11-21-2016, 11:49 AM   #3 (permalink)
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That said feed on the important things to get right is down aways on the list.


1. teach bite inhibition
ClickerSolutions Training Articles --
"Rather than "No bite," I strongly, strongly, strongly urge you to teach your puppy bite inhibition instead. Bite inhibition is a "soft mouth." It teaches the pup how to use his mouth gently. Does this mean that the pup will forever be mouthing you? No, not at all. Actually, regardless of the method used, puppies generally grow out of mouthing behavior after a few months.

So why should you teach bite inhibition? Because dogs have one defense: their teeth. Every dog can bite. If frightened enough or in pain or threatened, your dog *will* bite. That doesn't in any way make him a "bad" dog. It makes him a dog. It's your responsibility, therefore, to teach your dog that human skin is incredibly fragile. If you teach your dog bite inhibition that training will carry over even if he is later in a position where he feels forced to bite."

Teaching Bite Inhibition | Dog Star Daily
"Please read this section extremely carefully. I shall repeat over and over: teaching bite inhibition is the most important aspect of your puppy's entire education."

More On Bite Inhibition (Because It's So Important) | Dog Star Daily

2 Socialization/
http://www.avidog.com/wp-content/upl...ialization.pdf
"Because the first
three months are the period when sociability
outweighs fear, this is the primary window of
opportunity for puppies to adapt to new people,
animals, and experiences. Incomplete or improper
socialization during this important time
can increase the risk of behavioral problems
later in life including fear, avoidance, and/or
aggression. Behavioral problems are the greatest
threat to the owner-dog
bond. In fact, behavioral
problems are the number
one cause of relinquishment
to shelters.3
Behavioral issues, not
infectious diseases, are
the number one cause
of death for dogs under
three years of age.
While puppies’ immune
systems are still
developing during
these early months, the
combination of maternal
immunity, primary vaccination,
and appropriate care makes the risk
of infection relatively small compared to the
chance of death from a behavior problem.
Veterinarians specializing in behavior recommend
that owners take advantage of every safe
opportunity to expose young puppies to the
great variety of stimuli that they will experience
in their lives. Enrolling in puppy classes
prior to three months of age can be an excellent
means of improving training, strengthening the
human-animal bond, and socializing puppies
in an environment where risk of illness can be
minimized."

Puppy Socialisation and Habituation (Part 1) Why is it Necessary? | Association of Pet Behaviour Counsellors
"One in five of the dogs that Dr Valerie O’Farrell (1986) studied while conducting research at Edinburgh (Royal Dick) University Veterinary School had a behavioural problem to a lesser or greater extent. A similar, but larger, American study fixed the figure at one in four. In one year my practice treated 773 dogs - 79 of them, that’s 10 percent, had problems of fearfulness towards people or the environment due to a lack of early socialisation or habituation and a further 4.5. percent were inept at relating to other dogs, again due to a lack of early socialisation. The problem is immeasurably greater than these figures suggest. Many dogs show a weakness of temperament or inability to cope when faced with a particular situation, without their behaviour becoming problematical enough for the owners to seek help from a behavioural counsellor."

Puppy Socialisation and Habituation (Part 2) How to go about it | Association of Pet Behaviour Counsellors

ClickerSolutions Training Articles -- Countdown to a Crackerjack Canine Companion
"The optimal time to socialize your puppy is BEFORE it is three months old. Unfortunately, your pup needs to be confined indoors until then. This relatively short period of social isolation at such a crucial developmental time could all but ruin your puppy's temperament. Whereas dog-dog socialization may be put on temporary hold until your pup is old enough to go to puppy school and the dog park, we simply can not delay socialization with people. On the contrary, during the first month, while your pup is grounded at home, socializing with people becomes the Prime Puppy Directive. Without a doubt, raising and training a pup to be people-friendly is by far the single most important aspect of pet dog husbandry.

Capitalize on the time your pup is confined indoors by inviting people to your home. As a rule of thumb, your pup needs to socialize with at least 100 people before it is 3 months old. This is actually much easier than it sounds. Invite a different group of eight men each Sunday to watch sports on the television. (Generally, men are pretty easy to attract and train if you offer pizza and beer.) Each Monday invite a different group of eight women to watch Ally McBeal and Dateline. Catch up on all your outstanding social obligations by inviting family, friends and neighbors to weekly Puppy Parties. On another night of the week invite some neighborhood children. Above all, don't keep this puppy a secret. And of course, the great thing about socializing a young puppy is that it also does wonders for your own social life!
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Old 11-22-2016, 01:24 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikey T View Post
t0 prevent joint and growth problems it is best to keep a puppy on the thin side.
I can't let this comment go without saying no puppy should be deliberately 'kept on the thin side'. The puppy should be carrying the appropriate weight for his age and as this is a breed that should have 'substance', there no way I'd want to be seeing a thin Basset. No way. This would be untypical.

You should be able to feel the ribs, but not see them. And within reason, I let my puppies eat what they need so they become sound healthy adults. If a puppy is kept 'thin' if he should go down with something and become seriously unwell, he'll have nothing to fight the infection with.

As always with feeding, provided you have bought from an experienced breeder that's where you should be looking for advice with your particular puppy - nobody knows better what works for their bloodlines, at every step of the growing phase and beyond and they should be more than willing to help and advise. However, good breeders don't normally let the puppies they produce go home much before 8 weeks, minimum - we kept ours back to 10 weeks unless we knew who they were going to and they were experienced.

I'd never support overweight, but I'd also never support 'thin'.
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Old 11-22-2016, 03:03 PM   #5 (permalink)
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thank you for the reply!
i've been feeding him 1/2 cup 3 times a day with some treats along the day when i train him as rewards and also give him biscuit before bed and so far he's been doing really great and the vet said his weight is very good yay! he's 8 weeks today
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Old 11-22-2016, 03:28 PM   #6 (permalink)
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http://www.lgd.org/library/Optimal%2...%20puppies.pdf
" it is equally important to avoid overfeeding. Many people believe that
a round puppy is a happy healthy puppy. However, maximal growth is not
optimal growth. Adult size is principally influenced by genetics; however, the time
to reach adult size can and should be controlled by proper nutrition. Excess
calories can predispose large breed puppies to developmental bone disease,
including hypertrophic osteodystrophy (Dammrich, 1991).

...The goal is to keep growing puppies lean at about a
body condition score of around 4 on a scale of 1-9 (a score of 1 is emaciated and
9 is grossly obese). You should be able to easily feel the ribs. Study drawings
and complete descriptions of the desired body condition. A common body
condition scoring system is provided at the following site:
http://www.purina.com/dogs/health/BodyCondition.aspx"

Feeding Large Breed Puppies - IVC Journal
"In puppies, the BCS should be monitored weekly, since the calorie requirement constantly increases to six to 12 months of age (depending on the breed). Maintain a body condition score of 4/9 in large breed, rapidly growing puppies. Remind clients to ignore the feeding quantities listed on commercial bags and to follow recommended amounts for a fresh food diet."


http://clermontanimal.net/clients/20...gNutrition.pdf
"In large and giant breed dogs, puppy weight is a particularly important issue. Overweight puppies
in these breeds have a much higher incidence of developmental bone and joint problems. For this
reason, it is important to keep puppies of these breeds especially thin while they are growing. "


Feeding Your Puppy* – Animal Hospital of East Davie
According to Dr. Tony Buffington, Professor of Clinical Nutrition, Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine, your puppy can be fed a regimen of specific caloric intake compared to his body condition score (BCS), using a simple one to five scale, from overly thin to obese. Using manufacturer feeding recommendations as an initial starting point, feed your puppy to a score of two and maintain this weight until he's fully grown. Feed whatever amount is necessary to maintain a BCS of two during the growth period, realizing that dogs have varying growth rates and activity levels. Once his adult stature is achieved, you may allow him to reach a score of three.


...
2 = Thin - Ribs easily palpated and may be visible with no palpable fat. Tops of lumbar vertebrae visible. Pelvic bones less prominent. Obvious waist and abdominal tuck.
3 = Moderate - Ribs palpable without excess fat covering. Abdomen tucked up when viewed from side.


and most important the general public's perception of what a healthy weight is for a dog.

"https://thesciencedog.wordpress.com/tag/ideal-weight/"
'ost owners are aware that it is our responsibility to keep our dogs at a healthy body weight and in good condition. We all know this, right?

Perhaps not. A few statistics:

Obesity continues to be the number one nutritional problem in pet dogs in the United States.
According to the Association of Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP), veterinarians classified 53 percent of their canine patients as either overweight or obese.
In the same survey, only 22 percent of the owners identified their dog as being overweight.
APOP founder Dr. Ernie Ward refers to this cognitive disconnect as the “fat pet gap”. He suggests that American dog owners’ perceptions of what is normal in their dogs has been gradually distorted, leading to the perception that an overweight body type is normal.


IDEAL WEIGHT
FEBRUARY 24, 2015
“Do you think I look fat in this collar?”
Said no dog. Ever.

This is how dogs more likely consider the possibility of being overweight:

Fat Sounds Awesome

Most owners are aware that it is our responsibility to keep our dogs at a healthy body weight and in good condition. We all know this, right?

Perhaps not. A few statistics:

Obesity continues to be the number one nutritional problem in pet dogs in the United States.
According to the Association of Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP), veterinarians classified 53 percent of their canine patients as either overweight or obese.
In the same survey, only 22 percent of the owners identified their dog as being overweight.
APOP founder Dr. Ernie Ward refers to this cognitive disconnect as the “fat pet gap”. He suggests that American dog owners’ perceptions of what is normal in their dogs has been gradually distorted, leading to the perception that an overweight body type is normal.
Two Fat Labs
IS THIS THE NEW NORMAL?

Why the Disconnect? A common theory used to explain the mismatch between what owners perceive and what their dog actually looks like is that owners simply have not been taught how to recognize a fat dog and lack the knowledge to differentiate between a dog who is at ideal weight versus one who is slightly (or more) overweight. In an attempt to counteract this problem, pet food companies created Body Condition Scores. These are standardized five to 9-point visual scales designed to help owners and veterinarians correctly assess a dog’s body condition.

Problem solved? These scales have been around for more than 15 years. Yet, our dogs are still fat. Perhaps the scales are not being used? Are they difficult to understand? Recently a group of researchers asked the question: “If we give dog owners a BCS tool, show them how to use it, and then ask them to evaluate their own dog using the tool, will their assessments improve?” Their hypothesis was optimistic. They believed this would do the trick.

The Study: This was a pre-test/post-test study design and included a group of 110 owners and their dogs (1). In the pre-test portion of the study, the owner was asked to assess their dog’s body condition. No guidance was provided and the owner was required to select the word that best described their dog from a set of five terms; very thin, thin, ideal weight, overweight, or markedly obese. Following this assessment, the owner was provided with a five-point BCS chart that used the same five descriptors along with visual silhouettes and descriptions. They were given instructions of how to use the chart and were then asked to assess their dog a second time. The investigating veterinarian also assessed the dog using the BCS chart and physical examination.

Results: Several interesting (and surprising) results were reported:

Prior to using the BCS chart, 2/3 of the owners (66 %) incorrectly assessed their dog’s body condition. The majority underestimated body condition, believing their overweight dog to be at or near his or her ideal weight. These results are consistent with those reported by other researchers and with the APOP survey.
Following training with the BCS tool, these misperceptions persisted, showing virtually no change; 65 % were incorrect and only 15 % of owners changed their original score (some up/some down, and some from correct to incorrect!). The majority of owners continued to see their plump dog as being at his or her optimal weight.
Here is where things get really weird.
When queried, the majority of owners (77 %) stated that they believed that using the BCS chart had significantly improved their ability to estimate their dog’s body condition (huh?). This statement was made despite the fact that only 17 owners changed their scores after they learned to use the chart.
And, those who believed the chart had helped them fared no better in post-test success than the those who believed that the chart did not help them."
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Old 11-22-2016, 03:35 PM   #7 (permalink)
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" the vet said his weight is very good yay":

UNFORTUNATELY that is not always a good indication''

http://www.jetsetflyball.com/corpule...bsite_2012.pdf

8) The vet said that the dog was a good weight (or even underweight).
I have asked many vets why they don’t tell their clients that their dogs are overweight, and I always get the same answer: “I have lost so many clients because they were offended when I told them their dogs were overweight that I just don’t tell them anymore.” So please, don’t be offended – it doesn’t reflect on you personally. Honest.
The following is a real- life example of the importance of keeping our canine athletes at the proper weight. "
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Old 11-23-2016, 01:03 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Aw Gawd. THIS (lengthy reply) is EXACTLY why I can't be bothered to contribute to this forum any longer. What's the point?

Just know, all this copy/paste stuff (whichfor me, is too long to be bothered to wade through) isn't for the most part, to do with BASSETS (and no I've not checked with this latest)

For every article that can be copied and put on here, there will usually be another to put forward a different, perhaps opposite viewpoint. Nothing is really more relevant than first-hand EXPERIENCE.

ps Just for information, the construction problems I've had to face with my Basset, which I didn't breed and didn't buy until he was 4 months, were NOT caused because he was overweight but rather because of the food he was eating up to the time we had him. That food caused too much, too fast. SIZE not weight.

Last edited by FranksMum; 11-23-2016 at 01:05 PM.
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