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Old 07-22-2016, 08:39 AM   #21 (permalink)
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Shampoo therapy: making sense of all of the choices (Proceedings)

Shampoo therapy is an important adjuvant therapy in pets for treating a variety of dermatologic conditions. In order to get the maximum benefit of the shampoos, the shampoos need to be used properly. Contact time is of utmost importance when using shampoos. The shampoo needs to be on contact of the skin for 5 to 15 minutes. The contact time allows for proper hydration of the skin but provides sufficient time for the penetration and action of the shampoo ingredients. It is also important that shampoo be thoroughly rinsed off so that no residual shampoo is present which could irritate the skin.

...Depending on the condition being treated, some pets require twice weekly until adequate control of odor, grease and scale are achieved (usually 2 to 4 weeks worth of therapy). After that time, depending on the individual's response to the shampoo therapy, a maintenance shampoo as frequently as once weekly or as little as once monthly may be required. It is important to realize that the maintenance shampoo therapy may need to be adjusted depending on seasonal influences (i.e. variations in heat, humidity) since changes in environmental influences can affect dryness, greasiness, scaliness and the tendency to develop bacterial infections."

Try ‘Shampoo Therapy’ to help your dog’s itchy skin | Ruff Ideas
"There is a common misconception that you shouldn’t bathe your dogs very often and that doing so can make skin conditions worse. Most veterinarians treat skin disease through a combination of steroids and antibiotics. But if you’re like me, you want to stay away from harsh drugs and try all natural courses of action first. The use of ‘shampoo therapy’ to treat skin conditions may be the most overlooked natural therapy for dogs with skin disease.

You might not realize it, but your dog’s coat acts like a magnet for all kinds of dust, dander, toxins, yeast, bacteria and allergens. A weekly bath is essential for removing these potential hazards; especially if your dog has allergies. These substances can actually CAUSE the allergies."

http://www.drjwv.com/faq/?view=32
"Shampoo therapy is often used in conjunction with medical therapy for various types of skin disorders including ectoparasites (mange, lice, fleas), allergic skin disease, bacterial skin infections (pyoderma), fungal skin problems (ringworm, Malassezia dermatitis), and other disorders such as seborrhea, dry skin,, etc. When used correctly shampoos can be used to prevent secondary skin problems, control odor and contribute to the comfort and cleanliness of the patient. Bathing also rehydrates the skin and contributes to better overall skin health."

Grooming, Brushing & Bathing Your Puppy: Special Tips
"In the past, the generally accepted advice was that frequent bathing of your pet would damage the coat. Although this belief was never true, it was not until recently that the make-up and function of dogs' hair coats has been understood. Biochemically, the skin and hair of the normal puppy is very similar to that of a human. Both human and puppy skin and hair are comprised of protein with oil as a lubricant. Modern shampoos designed for dogs of all ages and coat types enable the owner to bathe their pet as often as desired, in some cases, daily. The average puppy probably commands a bath at least weekly. This not only helps control odor by removing excessive dander, oil, and bacteria, but also is hygienic in helping to prevent dirt-related skin infections"

Ask A Vet: How Often Should I Bathe My Dog? – iHeartDogs.com
"Most dogs (and their owners) can benefit from at least a weekly bath. It is a great time to assess your dog’s overall condition and also to wipe out her ears and eyes and check her teeth. Look carefully at her while she is wet to see if your notice anything out of the ordinary for her. Any lumps, bumps, patches of missing hair or unexplained weight loss, should trigger a call to your vet.

Baths provide a great chance to check your dog, make him smell better and also can be a good reminder to clean ears and eyes and check teeth. If your dog has been trained to think that baths are a routine part of his life, he will not resist this valuable part of his care."

Benefits Of Bathing Your Dog | Animal Wellness Magazine
"People frequently ask me how often they should bathe their dogs. Unfortunately, many still believe the old wive’s tale that says you shouldn’t bathe your dog more than once or twice a month. According to some, more frequent bathing might harm your dog’s skin or coat.

This is nothing more than a myth, and is not based upon any medical fact.
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Old 07-22-2016, 08:59 AM   #22 (permalink)
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Shampoo therapy: making sense of all of the choices (Proceedings)

Shampoo therapy is an important adjuvant therapy in pets for treating a variety of dermatologic conditions. In order to get the maximum benefit of the shampoos, the shampoos need to be used properly. Contact time is of utmost importance when using shampoos. The shampoo needs to be on contact of the skin for 5 to 15 minutes. The contact time allows for proper hydration of the skin but provides sufficient time for the penetration and action of the shampoo ingredients. It is also important that shampoo be thoroughly rinsed off so that no residual shampoo is present which could irritate the skin.

...Depending on the condition being treated, some pets require twice weekly until adequate control of odor, grease and scale are achieved (usually 2 to 4 weeks worth of therapy). After that time, depending on the individual's response to the shampoo therapy, a maintenance shampoo as frequently as once weekly or as little as once monthly may be required. It is important to realize that the maintenance shampoo therapy may need to be adjusted depending on seasonal influences (i.e. variations in heat, humidity) since changes in environmental influences can affect dryness, greasiness, scaliness and the tendency to develop bacterial infections."

Try ‘Shampoo Therapy’ to help your dog’s itchy skin | Ruff Ideas
"There is a common misconception that you shouldn’t bathe your dogs very often and that doing so can make skin conditions worse. Most veterinarians treat skin disease through a combination of steroids and antibiotics. But if you’re like me, you want to stay away from harsh drugs and try all natural courses of action first. The use of ‘shampoo therapy’ to treat skin conditions may be the most overlooked natural therapy for dogs with skin disease.

You might not realize it, but your dog’s coat acts like a magnet for all kinds of dust, dander, toxins, yeast, bacteria and allergens. A weekly bath is essential for removing these potential hazards; especially if your dog has allergies. These substances can actually CAUSE the allergies."

http://www.drjwv.com/faq/?view=32
"Shampoo therapy is often used in conjunction with medical therapy for various types of skin disorders including ectoparasites (mange, lice, fleas), allergic skin disease, bacterial skin infections (pyoderma), fungal skin problems (ringworm, Malassezia dermatitis), and other disorders such as seborrhea, dry skin,, etc. When used correctly shampoos can be used to prevent secondary skin problems, control odor and contribute to the comfort and cleanliness of the patient. Bathing also rehydrates the skin and contributes to better overall skin health."

Grooming, Brushing & Bathing Your Puppy: Special Tips
"In the past, the generally accepted advice was that frequent bathing of your pet would damage the coat. Although this belief was never true, it was not until recently that the make-up and function of dogs' hair coats has been understood. Biochemically, the skin and hair of the normal puppy is very similar to that of a human. Both human and puppy skin and hair are comprised of protein with oil as a lubricant. Modern shampoos designed for dogs of all ages and coat types enable the owner to bathe their pet as often as desired, in some cases, daily. The average puppy probably commands a bath at least weekly. This not only helps control odor by removing excessive dander, oil, and bacteria, but also is hygienic in helping to prevent dirt-related skin infections"

Ask A Vet: How Often Should I Bathe My Dog? – iHeartDogs.com
"Most dogs (and their owners) can benefit from at least a weekly bath. It is a great time to assess your dog’s overall condition and also to wipe out her ears and eyes and check her teeth. Look carefully at her while she is wet to see if your notice anything out of the ordinary for her. Any lumps, bumps, patches of missing hair or unexplained weight loss, should trigger a call to your vet.

Baths provide a great chance to check your dog, make him smell better and also can be a good reminder to clean ears and eyes and check teeth. If your dog has been trained to think that baths are a routine part of his life, he will not resist this valuable part of his care."

Benefits Of Bathing Your Dog | Animal Wellness Magazine
"People frequently ask me how often they should bathe their dogs. Unfortunately, many still believe the old wive’s tale that says you shouldn’t bathe your dog more than once or twice a month. According to some, more frequent bathing might harm your dog’s skin or coat.

This is nothing more than a myth, and is not based upon any medical fact.
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Old 07-22-2016, 09:09 AM   #23 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vectisvagrant View Post
[COLOR=#000000][FONT=HelveticaNeue]Must be having a bad day but, what's the relevance of being a 'Nursing Major' & your boy friend a 'chemist ', to do with the post other than the implication that you know better, find the suggestion that using olive oil to lubricate the intestines to using small amounts for softening ear wax tenuous. IMO common sense is intuitive not learnt.
I guess so too. I was thanking you for your advice. I planned on looking into the oil idea since I do know the importance of it in other parts of the body and never thought to use it for ear wax softening. My boyfriend freaked at the idea and I thought he was crazy. I honestly appreciated your advice because I will be considering it. Thank you.
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Old 07-22-2016, 09:17 AM   #24 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by FranksMum View Post
Not all Bassets hate water We had three that we ran on from an excellent litter, who'd regularly swim in our 'lake' (1 acre pond). The others would stand on the bank looking on in amazement. And it wasn't 'normal'! And we had another who loved us getting the hose out. She's chase the end of the stream of water endlessly until she finally 'grew up' and realised she was on a hiding to nothing really. Great game.

We take Walter to the park where there is a little river/stream and plenty of ducks. He will run down to the waters edge and give a little growl then run back up. Its pretty funny. Same thing he did when we went to the beach. Although the waves would "get him" a couple times, and at which point he would run back to me and roll around in the sand to get the water off.
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Old 07-23-2016, 04:55 AM   #25 (permalink)
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Just to add my 3 pond-swimmers didn't wear any floatation device. The only trouble they had was if the water got into their ears and then they'd shake their heads, making them sink!! It was about 18 ft up that end of the pond too but much as sometimes my heart was in my mouth, they survived - the pity was they'd come out via the muddy end - meaning they had to be hosed off before coming indoors!! Happy days.
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Old 07-23-2016, 09:40 AM   #26 (permalink)
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Yeah, I would be nervous too! His life jacket comes in tomorrow and we go on a canoeing trip Wednesday so we will see how it goes. Thanks for all the advice!
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