Help walking my boy - Basset Hounds: Basset Hound Dog Forums
Basset.net is the premier Basset Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 04-18-2017, 11:37 PM   #1 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 4
Thumbs down Help walking my boy

I have 2 basset hounds. My girl is well behaved (8 yo) and walks well on and off leash. My boy (3yo) is a bit of a bull in a china closet but he does well on leash until we disagree on the direction we are going. If he wants to go a different way (usually toward people or dogs) he can not be moved. He braces himself and hunches down. I'm not sure how to train him to stop doing this. He is also very good at slipping out of his collar so I'm going to get a harness & would love your recommendations on those too. I've had bassets for 20 years so I know they are independent thinkers but Charlie is proving to be a challenge!

Anyone had success dealing with this behavior?
SplashingInPuddles is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-19-2017, 04:02 PM   #2 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
PollyEster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Midwest
Posts: 262
Default

Many like to use a harness, and there are some gentle leader ones that "encourage". I use a martingale collar, or half-check....properly fitted they will snug up behind the ears but not choke, but they can't slip them. The collar then loosens and fits loosely on the neck when walking "nicely". I did end up using a Gentle leader or Halti, which fits on the head for Stanley...at 90lbs of rescue Walker who was flat out uncontrollable at first.

Bribes work wonders, but Stanley just didn't care for a treat if he REALLY wanted to go elsewhere.....but a good hard tug, standing my ground and "no Stanley, Come, this way" and lots of praise when he eventually did worked. Now I don't have to tug...just "no Stanley, this way" and he will...and walks on a loose lead with a martingale.
PollyEster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2017, 11:35 AM   #3 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Mikey T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Eastford, CT
Posts: 12,348
Send a message via Yahoo to Mikey T
Default

"very good at slipping out of his collar so I'm going to get a harness & would love your recommendations on those too"


1. My collar slips can pull out of a traditional harness as well, and yes even slip leads and martingales if you are not careful. Doing nothing is how bassets deal with stress.

2. bribes never really work , which is the problem when people use food in training the wrong way. see

Lures, Rewards and Bribes | Dog Star Daily

Rewards, Lures & Bribes | Relationship Centered Dog Training by Suzanne Clothier

Also a dog that under normal circumstances takes food that won't in others is usually stressed,


3. There are a number of Tools as a mean in of assisting getting the desired behavior. Polly Ester mentioned one a head halter. For me this would be relatively low on list of tools to use for this particular behavior. I like head halter when the behavior require the control of the head other than that not so much. This does not mean it is an inappropriate use of the tool or anything like that just a difference in preference. I liken it to remove a nut from a bolt. There are plethora of tools from the job different type wrenches sockets and ratchets etc even multi purpose tools pliers, locking pliers, adjustable wrenches etc So which tool is best for a particular job comes down to availability and preference though in some circumstance a particular to may simply not work at all.

For a problem like your I would recommend a Sporn Original Halter or some copycat product. http://sporn.com/training/yup-original-sporn-halter It is the only product I have never had a dog escape from. And given its design is think it is highly unlikely to ever occur. If however as a trainer you have a problem with using aversives and punishment in training it is not a tool that will work for you,


Keep in mind no tool is the solution. Training is the solution however a tool can help give you back the control you need to train the solution.

Last edited by Mikey T; 04-20-2017 at 11:51 AM.
Mikey T is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 04-20-2017, 09:45 PM   #4 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 4
Default

Thanks for responding. In a harness, I'm just looking for a way to keep him more in control and I also don't want his neck to be injured. My goal is to train him rather than relying on the harness but I can't figure out how to work with him when he is so distracted by what he wants to go towards that he unable to focus on me at all. He isn't standing still out of fear, he is just refusing to move in the opposite direction from his object of desire. if he slips this collar he runs straight toward the dog/person as happy as can be.
SplashingInPuddles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2017, 09:47 AM   #5 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Mikey T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Eastford, CT
Posts: 12,348
Send a message via Yahoo to Mikey T
Default

standard harness actual are designed to stimulate the dog to pull more. I do not recommend them for anyone having on leash control issues.


Stress is not fear. Though fear is often stressful just as excitement is stressful. Not getting what they want is stressful. Being physically restrained is stressful/ Stress in a physiological sense is measured by cortisol levels Situations the elevate cortisol levels are said to induce stress.

Stress in Dogs and How to Manage It | Webvet

The effect of dog?human interaction on cortisol and behavior in registered animal-assisted activity dogs

https://www.stress.org/what-is-stress/
"he term “stress”, as it is currently used was coined by Hans Selye in 1936, who defined it as “the non-specific response of the body to any demand for change”. Selye had noted in numerous experiments that laboratory animals subjected to acute but different noxious physical and emotional stimuli (blaring light, deafening noise, extremes of heat or cold, perpetual frustration) all exhibited the same pathologic changes of stomach ulcerations, shrinkage of lymphoid tissue and enlargement of the adrenals. He later demonstrated that persistent stress could cause these animals to develop various diseases similar to those seen in humans, such as heart attacks, stroke, kidney disease and rheumatoid arthritis. ...Any definition of stress should therefore also include good stress, or what Selye called eustress. For example, winning a race or election can be just as stressful as losing, or more so. A passionate kiss and contemplating what might follow is stressful, but hardly the same as having a root canal procedure."

I dogs natural reaction to restraint especially across the chest is to resist the stronger the pressure of the restraint the stronger the dogs react. Hence the problem with traditional harnesses for anything but weight pulling.
Mikey T is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:10 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2 ©2009, Crawlability, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
PetGuide.com
Basset Hound Forum Doberman Forum Golden Retriever Forum Beagle Forum
Boxer Forum Dog Forum Pit Bull Forum Poodle Forum
Bulldog Forum Fish Forum Havanese Forum Maltese Forum
Cat Forum German Shepherd Forum Labradoodle Forum Yorkie Forum Hedgehog Forum
Chihuahua Forum Retriever Breeds Cichlid Forum Dart Frog Forum Mice Breeder Forum