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Old 01-20-2013, 04:01 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Suitable training methods

Hiya! Emma finally had all her puppy vaccinations completed and we are ready to start some obedience training. Previously with Oscar, we did petco puppy class (mostly treat driven) and scotch pines training class (she uses pretty firm corrections methods) but Oscar did so well with it on walks, sit,stay,come and even down stay and all that. I am concerned though because even though this method works on him but it seems harsh for a Basset? What kind of training will benefit a Basset? I really just want her to be able to sit,stay,come and oh...to not jump on people when we have visitors. I don't need little tricks like roll over and stuff. Any advice is greatly appreciated.
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Old 01-20-2013, 05:18 PM   #2 (permalink)
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You will get more detailed responses from the experts, but I would say that most of the bassets on this board respond well to treats. They are not usually very motivated to please you; you have to make it worth their while.
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Old 01-20-2013, 05:42 PM   #3 (permalink)
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If the question is can you teach a basset using tradination method ie correction with choke chain the answer is yes, But it depend more on the individual dog than the breed. THat said most basset respond better to more positive methods, On training there are two parts to training and just because the dog might do better with a particular method if you are not able to implement it well it won't work as well as something that mau not be as suited to the dog but you can implement well. When it comes to training nothing is permenent. if it does not work try something else.
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Old 01-20-2013, 06:30 PM   #4 (permalink)
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If the question is can you teach a basset using tradination method ie correction with choke chain the answer is yes, But it depend more on the individual dog than the breed. THat said most basset respond better to more positive methods, On training there are two parts to training and just because the dog might do better with a particular method if you are not able to implement it well it won't work as well as something that mau not be as suited to the dog but you can implement well. When it comes to training nothing is permenent. if it does not work try something else.
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Old 01-21-2013, 11:22 AM   #5 (permalink)
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I find hot dog sausages and cheese works well. Although Bella sometimes prefers everybody else's treats to ours. And then practice what you've learnt at class about 10 mins a day, otherwise your dog makes you look like a fool at the next class. And the thing is you know that they are secretly laughing at you inside.

My main advice for obedience training is keep it happy, there's no point in getting upset when your dog decides that it doesn't want to do anything that particular class, because really your hound doesn't care that it's embarrassing you in front of impeccably trained dogs and their owners, your dog is having a ball misbehaving.

Bella will work fantastically at class one week and then the next be an absolute monster. Bella has trained the trainer to accept that she likes to be different every now and then and we just get on as best we can, with totally different methods to everybody else but if it works then keep at it.
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Old 01-22-2013, 01:08 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Haven't found Bassets difficult to train, they are so food orientated & as long as you make it fun & both enjoy it, but having said that whether they choose to obey when out & about is another matter. Owning a scent hound you are not going to get a quick response, some days it just makes my heart sing if they look in my direction when out walking off lead. Don't get angry, harsh or physical, nobody reacts well to that especially sensitive Bassets. Personally don't allow choke chains in the house or near our dogs, yes I'm sure if used correctly I'm going to be told there fine, just always want to remove it from a dogs neck & slip it around the owners .
http://flyingpawsdogtraining.weebly.com/damage-by-choke-chains.html
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Old 01-22-2013, 01:41 PM   #7 (permalink)
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for what it is worth the only reall study done on the matter of training injuries to the throats sould no colrrolation between slib leads chock collars, prong collar or flat buckle collars it was not the type collar that created damage but the correction itself.


When training heeling I use a sporn halter imho it is better in two way one it can not cause neck damage. and A large portion of the basset population appears to have no nerve ending in there neck so a correct to this area is ineffective to begin with, They (BASSETS) are much more sensative in the arm pit area,


While I advocate possitive reinforcement techniques for training , I also know my limitation and I can not train an consistent heel using positive reinforcement only for me does not work when training heeling, other task certainly . That is why it is important to be flexible and figure out what works for you and not be afraid to try something diferent if a particular methodology is not working for you after giving it a reasonable chance at success.
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Old 01-22-2013, 04:12 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Default Suitable training methods

Thank you everyone! I think I will enroll Emma at petco puppy class for a start. I highly agree this is a sensitive breed and Emma cowers or runs away whenever we raise our voice at her. We took her to the dog park for the first time last weekend and she was pretty overwhelmed by puppies who yapped at her. She barely left my side or only dared to venture far when she has Oscar with her. I was sad. But maybe it's her first time there so I hope she will do better next time. Anyhow, with that said, she seems she will benefit from positive reinforcements like treats and I'll explore other methods if I don't get the desired results. At this point, she can sit for treats and will take NO pretty well. But man, she won't COME for you without a treat or any bait ( like clapping hands) it's frustrating.


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Old 01-22-2013, 04:50 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Quote:
But man, she won't COME for you without a treat or any bait
most problems with recall come down to this

Poisoned cues
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The poisoned cue is pretty much a description of what the term means. You take a perfectly well trained cue, and poison it using not very nice training methods like coercion or intentional or unintentional punishment, instead of positive reinforcement. You can poison a cue, like your dog’s name, or your recall command using punishment, and voila, your cue creates stress and displacement behaviors instead of a joyful responses to your cue. One newish negative buzz word Jesus discusses is command. I think that Karen and henceforth others, are saying that a command now has the connotation of a behavior which was taught not using positive reinforcement. I might argue that I can teach a command using positive reinforcement without poisoning the word command but anyway, we all know that cue is the new command, just like brown became the new black in clothing choice a few years ago. Whatever the terminology, mixing up the use of positive reinforcement with corrections in training can get you into big trouble.

It can be as simple as call the dog to you when your going to the vet etc... when training a recall you better make sure when you use a cue that it is a happy experience for the odg or you risk poisioning it.

Rocket recall training

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The reasons behind a dog refusing to come when called depends upon the competing motivators and the dog’s previous experiences. For instance, if you are at a dog park with your dog and you call for your dog, you have the competing motivators of the other dogs around him. Plus, if the only times you call your dog to come to you is when it’s time to leave, which is no fun for your dog, you have previous experiences that your dog perceives as negative. He’s going to continue to play with his buddies and ignore you. We have to reinforce coming HEAVILY at the start and always make sure we’re keeping it fun for the dog.
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Old 01-22-2013, 05:22 PM   #10 (permalink)
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If your pup is nervous the sooner he gets involved with puppy training the better, getting out & about in a safe controlled atmosphere but do ensure it's a positive. I would not be clapping hands, raising your voice, using a squirt bottle, stamping your foot or anything similar use positive motivators, treats, toys, a good ear rub. Still carry treats everytime I go out with them, call them back often during a walk even when it's not necessary & reward them so it's not always to end something they're enjoying. Remember Bassets have a pause button, they're never (unlikely) to respond quickly, make you're self interesting, hide, jump up & down waving your arms if you get stressed & it shows in your voice they'll be even slower.
PS mine aren't that great, every item of clothing with pockets has treats even my dressing gown & I've been asked which one is named biscuit!
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