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Old 01-04-2013, 04:30 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default My new puppy

My new puppy-imageuploadedbypg-free1357335026.810762.jpg

My new puppy-imageuploadedbypg-free1357335037.216065.jpg

My new puppy-imageuploadedbypg-free1357335054.471995.jpg


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Old 01-04-2013, 04:34 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Any tips on biting and potty training?


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Old 01-04-2013, 04:55 PM   #3 (permalink)
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on biting you actual do not want to stop them from biting what you want to do is teach them not to bite hard!. YOU ONLY , hve a limited time to train this which is the most important training you can provide for a puppy see

Bite inhibition = how to teach it
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Rather than "No bite," I strongly, strongly, strongly urge you to teach your puppy bite inhibition instead. Bite inhibition is a "soft mouth." It teaches the pup how to use his mouth gently. Does this mean that the pup will forever be mouthing you? No, not at all. Actually, regardless of the method used, puppies generally grow out of mouthing behavior after a few months.
So why should you teach bite inhibition? Because dogs have one defense: their teeth. Every dog can bite. If frightened enough or in pain or threatened, your dog *will* bite. That doesn't in any way make him a "bad" dog. It makes him a dog. It's your responsibility, therefore, to teach your dog that human skin is incredibly fragile. If you teach your dog bite inhibition that training will carry over even if he is later in a position where he feels forced to bite.
A story... Ian Dunbar tells a story of a bite incident he had to asses. A Golden Retriever therapy dog was leaving a nursing home and his tail was accidentally shut in a car door. The owner went to help, and the dog delivered four Level Four bites before she could react.
FYI, a standard scale has been developed to judge the severity of dog bites, based on damage inflicted. The scale is:
* Level One: Bark, lunge, no teeth on skin.
* Level Two: Teeth touched, no puncture.
* Level Three: 1-4 holes from a single bite. All holes less than half the length of a single canine tooth.
* Level Four: Single bite, deep puncture (up to one and a half times the depth of a single canine tooth), wound goes black within 24 hours.
* Level Five: Multiple bite attack or multiple attack incidents.
* Level Six: Missing large portions of flesh.
Technically, the woman received a Level Five bite from a long-time therapy dog. Dr. Dunbar wasn't the least bit surprised by the bites. I mean, the dog got his tail shut in a car door! Of course he bit! What shocked Dr. DUnbar was that a dog with no bite inhibition was being used as a therapy dog.
"But he's never bitten before." Of course not. And barring an accident like that, he probably never would have. But an accident is just that. An accident. Unpredicted. What if it had happened in the nursing home?
teaching bite Inhibition
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Please read this section extremely carefully. I shall repeat over and over: teaching bite inhibition is the most important aspect of your puppy's entire education.
More on bite Inhibition because it is so Important

Most people I beleive run into problems whith teaching bite inhibtion when they let the puppy get over exite in play. When a puppy is overly excited it litterally can not hear you or learn. see the over stimulated hyper dog
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glimpse of a fast-moving object about to fall on your head.
Limbic over-rides cognitive. When an animal is in a state of adrenalin arousal from fear, defense, excitement or just plain sensory overload, he not only doesn't listen, he can't hear you. It does no good to repeat "sit sit sit" to a dog who is on emotional overload. He isn't thinking, he is simply reacting to the stimuli around him. He must tune-in and re-connect with you before he will be able to hear what you have to say. You must be able to get his attention first, before you tell him what you would like him to do.



What I do when a puppy is becoming to excited I stop the play and moving very slowly ( a dogs feed of you, if you move slow and calmly the dog will eventually too but if you move quickly the dog will become more excited) and try and pet the pup. if he trys to bite the hand or even moves toward it I withdraw the hand an try a few seconds later. Once the the dog ,allows be to pet a couple sroke I resume the play. This does two things. One it teachs self control and the dog learns to calm itself quickly because then it gets to play. and secondly it keep the dog in a mind set that it is possible to train.
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Old 01-04-2013, 04:58 PM   #4 (permalink)
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ahhh and people wonder why bassets steal laundry. hahaha
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Old 01-04-2013, 05:07 PM   #5 (permalink)
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second most important thing with a pup is not potty training but habituation and socialization see the following link


Puppy Socialisation and Habituation (Part 1) Why is it Necessary?

Puppy Socialisation and Habituation (Part 2) How to go about it

AVSAB Position Statement On Puppy Socialization
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The primary and mostostost impoportatant time for puppy socialization is the first three months of life.1, 2 During this time puppies should be exposed to as many new people, animals, stimuli and environments as can be achieved safely and without causing overstimulation manifested as excessive fear, withdrawal or avoidance behavior. For this reason, the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior believes that it should be the standard of care for puppies to receive such socialization before they are fully vaccinated.

...Behavioral problems are the greatest threat to the owner-dog bond. In fact, behavioral problems are the number one cause of relinquishment to shelters.3 Behavioral issues, not infectious diseases, are the number one cause of death for dogs under three years of age.

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Old 01-04-2013, 05:19 PM   #6 (permalink)
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I don't understand the social behavior


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Old 01-04-2013, 05:48 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Hi! I'm sorry I don't wanna hog the post at all but I was reading the article about bite inhibition. Being a newbie I didn't know about this when Harvey would have been the appropriate age so we just kinda played it by the ear with the biting. I don't think he is a biting dog cause even he is still a pup he rarely even play bites. My question for you Mikey T would be is there something I should/could be teaching him now (at 11 months)? If he play bites he does back of if we say ouch and comes to lick the hand afterwards ( we never thought that but he has done it always). He has only once play bit my foot when it wasn't "part of the game" but once is enough no? If you could give me your thoughts I'd be very happy!


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Old 01-04-2013, 06:18 PM   #8 (permalink)
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@kenziethebasset: very cute puppy.

you will benefit from lots of advice on potty training on this forum.

we got ours at 12 weeks. took her out about every 15 mins at first then right back in. keep in mind they don't have a large bladder capacity when young.

patience and consistency and lots of praise worked well
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Old 01-04-2013, 06:20 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Quote:
would be is there something I should/could be teaching him now (at 11 months)?
by 11 month trying to teach bite inhibtion is unreliable. I would be working on elminating mouthing altogether unless invited to. ie mouth on skin ends game. This need to only be brief period not minutes or hours.
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Old 01-04-2013, 06:26 PM   #10 (permalink)
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I don't understand the social behavior
not social behavior , Socialzation and Habituation. There is only a very small window to get the dog acosum to all that it will see in the world. Some were between 12-20 weeks of age that window close and that which the dog has not be exposed to it likely will be fearful of. So dog that have only been in the company of women for the first four month of life are likely going to be afraid of men. A dog that has not be exposed to various men with facial hair are often afraid of them when they get older. Same with uniforms like mailmen etc.
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