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Old 12-18-2012, 02:29 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Joey has started humping a lot. Toys, legs especially. Also biting me.
With the humping I'm unsure weather to tell him off or not. It's very confusing for us both!

With the biting, it gets to a certain time of day usually after evening meal where he is going crazy scratching biting barking non stop for about half hour, it's awfull because his teeth are like razors. I tell him no stop etc but he goes crazy.

He's nearly 4 months old now, I'm sure someone out there has gone through the same and wanting advise please xxx


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Old 12-18-2012, 04:07 PM   #2 (permalink)
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humping, that is purely your call on whether you feel it is appropriae. ie dogs on the furniture etc.

on the nipping see the following links

bite Inhibition how to teach it

Teaching Bite Inhibition

More On Bite Inhibition (Because It's So Important)

Insights Into Puppy Mouthing
Quote:
And about the yelping out in pain technique. I hate when people suggest this as if it is the Holy Grail of stopping mouthing. It totally depends on why the dog is nipping, how you yelp and how they respond to the yelping. With some dogs this idea alone can stop nipping and play biting in its tracks. But as you have discovered there are other dogs who are simply more triggered by the response. And you actually escalate the intensity of the behavior.

We can't ever just say if a dog is doing X behavior that a handler should always do Y handling technique. It just never is that black and white.

Its all about probabilities. If a dog does X behavior and the response is Y technique than we can often say there is a high probability of a particular response happening with most dogs. There are some fundamental things that are very high probability that apply to many dogs that do nothing or get a completely opposite response from other dogs.

Run away there is a good chance the average dog will follow or chase. Squat down or make little cooing noises then the probability is high they will come closer. But you must always take into account the dog's personality, relationship, situation, current emotional and mental state, temperament and history.

Run away from another dog and them may take you down with a bite in the butt. Squat down for and make cooing sounds with an abused fear biter and you may loose your nose.

It looks complicated when plotting it out but in general people have a much better feel for what the dog's probabilities for certain things are then they do in applying that knowledge to specific situations.

90% of the time if I clearly define something for owners and ask what their dog will likely do, they have a wonderfully detailed knowledge of what their dog will probably do. But most people don't look at the perimeters objectively or with clarity and worse they fall into a pattern of waiting until the dog has done the thing they don't want that they knew was probably going to happen. They then respond to what the dog did even though they could have predicted the Undesired response a week ahead of time.
now for the part in red and this is the part I think most people miss. You know the dog is going to esculate the biteing behavior at certain time so rather than let that happen interceed sooner rather than later. As what happen is during play the dog gets more and more excite. at some point it reaches the point of no return that is he literal an not hear you or respond to you. see the over stimulated and hyper Dog It is critcal you stay below that threshold. So you need to stop the play before he looses all control. I practice with young pups at an early age. play stop and pet. If the go for the hand that is to touch them I stop. ans start a few moment later. It is critical because the pup will feed of your energy to move very slowly and calmly. during this stage. when the accept being petted then resume. play. The pup quickly learns the sooner it calms itself the sooner it gets to play again. using the premack principal to reward the calm behavior.

another self control exercise I recommend is

The Down & Dirty on Humping: Sex, Status, and Beyond
Quote:
When To Intervene
It is my opinion that human intervention in the interest of the welfare of the humpee is appropriate in any situation where humping is non-consensual. Consent is easily tested in dog-dog situations by removing the humper mid-action and seeing whether or not the humpee takes the opportunity to flee. If he or she sticks around for more, you can assume it is consensual. In the case of dog-human humping, I think it is reasonable to curb the behaviour if either the owner of the dog or the person being humped doesn’t like it, or if the humpee is a child. It also seems appropriate to intervene if it is decided that the humping behaviour itself is problematic, regardless of who or what is on the receiving end. In other words, if you find it embarrassing, frightening, or worrisome, or if your dog is gooping up your sofa pillow and giving himself a friction burn, then go ahead and curb it. Other than an intact male pursuing a bitch in heat, we can teach our feisty friends to control their natural impulses, but we ought to do so using only non-violent methods.
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Old 12-19-2012, 06:33 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Joey has got an ice cube this afternoon, I read up that its soothes there gums. He loves it bless him.
I've also soaked a dishcloth and put it in freezer for later.
I feel so sorry for him, sometimes I wish he could talk human language xx


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Old 12-19-2012, 06:55 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Ellie is 5 months now and when I first got her she was doing the biting thing (actually shredding my hands and arms).

I tried the "yelping" thing, it just excited her more. I tried calmly removing my limb and telling her no. that would only work for about an instant. Lots and other trial and errors... but, what is and has been working best with Ellie is (i) remove the limb gently as to not further shred my hand (ii) gently hold her muzzle shut and say "Be Nice, Be Nice and (iii) if she doesn't try to grab again right away, I tell her "Good Girl!" then give her something she is allowed to gnaw on like a toy or rawhide.

I bought a pack of these rawhide's about 6 inches long, about 1/2-3/4 inch in diameter. They are all over the house and at least one is in reach no matter where you sit in my house (including the bathroom!) Ellie really seems to like them and it is saving my arms and hands. I do, however, toss them out as they get to small and could be a choking hazard. If she can't "hold" them in her paws, they have gotten to small for me to let her have them.

I hope this helps, I am no expert, just the mom of a puppy with formerly razor sharp teeth! BTW, I wish I would have thought of the frozen dishtowel when she was teething, that is brilliant!
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