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Old 11-20-2012, 08:16 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Humping Question...[yes I know it sounds funny!]

My neighbor has a male neutered miniature border collie who is 6 years old. Our Basset Maddie is spayed, and is 5.

We thought it would be fun to have Maddie and Chewie have play dates, as they don't get much time with other dogs, so Chewie was brought over to play.

All he wanted to do was hump Maddie, who didn't even seem to notice. He was running after her, getting behind and humping away, and she acted like he wasn't even there. We took her over to the neighbors house, and the same thing happened. She ran around investigating all the new scents in the unfamiliar yard, happy as could be, and all the while Chewie ran behind to hump her every time she stopped to smell.

It got to be bizarre to me. Maddie came to the glass sliding door to come inside, and as she stood there, she was moving back and forth because Chewie was on her. I opened the door and let her inside, and Chewie stayed there humping air, with a desperate, horrible glazed look in his eyes and frantic panting.

What would make a dog do this? He does have the kind of brain where it seems to spin 1000 miles a second - in fact, my cat is like this, but she doesn't hump.

The dogs aren't brought together anymore. I would love to help my neighbor find a solution to her dog's behavior though. It doesn't seem sexual or dominant behavior, it's like he can't think of anything else to do with other dogs?

I was surprised that Maddie didn't correct him, to be honest. She's reacted aggressively every other time a dog has tried to hump her, including one of her brothers. He started humping her, and she whipped around and got him down on his back so fast, he was stunned! She weighed 50 lbs, he weighed 75 at the time. With Chewie though, she literally acts as if he isn't there at all, as if she's alone. I've never seen anything like it.

Sorry if I sound stupid, I don't know much about dogs, and this horrible compulsive humping my neighbors dog does concerns me. Any help is appreciated. Is there anyway to get him to stop? Why would he do this?
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Old 11-20-2012, 08:32 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Hi San,

My Basset has been neutered for 5 years and he still does the mid-air hump quite often. I too have no idea what the reasoning is behind it and to be honest, it makes me laugh as his whole facial expression changes for those few seconds.

I've just bought in a 9 week old puppy to the house (also a boy) and it's complete role reversal. He is humping Boris fairly often but it only happens during playtime. I think in puppies it may well be a play thing rather than anything else so perhaps this is the reasoning behind your neighbours dog doing it too?

Oh to be a dog and having nothing to worry about apart from what piece of air to try and hump next huh?! lol.

Hopefully someone else with more humping experience might throw some more light onto it
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Old 11-20-2012, 12:38 PM   #3 (permalink)
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I don't know either but maybe he's just super super excited about having some dog company since he hasn't had a lot. Funny my girls are like Maddie they do not put up with the boys just saddling up to them and then trying to mount. I don't know whats going on but in these circumstances it does look kind of sexy. They tell them off immediately - sometimes it worries me- but the boys always listen and back off sharpish. But other times like in play they don't mind. I wonder if you got together with Chewie more and his overwhelming excitement might subside and he'll stop humping (or as much). It sounds like Maddie is very clued in and knows this isn't a problem for her otherwise shed let him know.
Maybe going for a walk together - something more structured might help.
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Old 11-20-2012, 05:04 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Quote:
Sorry if I sound stupid, I don't know much about dogs, and this horrible compulsive humping my neighbors dog does concerns me.


why? non of the dogs involved had a problem with it. IMHO best to leave our oewn bias and sexual mores out of dog behavior and what behaviors are ok and not ok for dogs to engage in.
All i'm saying is your conercen about someone eslses dogs behavior say more about you than the dog. beacause the behavior is perfectly normal and common.


The Down & Dirty on Humping: Sex, Status, and Beyond
Quote:
Arousal Triggers: Play, Excitement, and Conflict
Quote:
Play seems to be a very common trigger for humping, probably because it is both a good opportunity for practicing important behaviors, as mentioned above, and also because it creates an exciting, stimulating atmosphere – a sexual trigger in many species, not just dogs! This notion that general arousal can tip over into sexual arousal is supported by the fact that humping seems to be triggered by other stimulating experiences besides play. For example, my pit bull Charlotte will often begin pelvic thrusting as she digs in to the wax feast of my beagle Bender’s ears. Not my idea of excitement – but to each her own! Humping can also occur in conflict situations that cause mild frustration or anxiety – settings where a dog wants to do something, but isn’t allowed to, and funnels the energy into another totally unrelated behaviour. I knew a lab who would hump the cat only when told to stop begging at the dinner table. We humans tend to do more “civilized” things when we are conflicted or a bit anxious, like tap our feet or twiddle with our hair… since humping is considered a very private behaviour in most societies!

...It is my opinion that human intervention in the interest of the welfare of the humpee is appropriate in any situation where humping is non-consensual. Consent is easily tested in dog-dog situations by removing the humper mid-action and seeing whether or not the humpee takes the opportunity to flee. If he or she sticks around for more, you can assume it is consensual. In the case of dog-human humping, I think it is reasonable to curb the behaviour if either the owner of the dog or the person being humped doesn’t like it, or if the humpee is a child. It also seems appropriate to intervene if it is decided that the humping behaviour itself is problematic, regardless of who or what is on the receiving end. In other words, if you find it embarrassing, frightening, or worrisome, or if your dog is gooping up your sofa pillow and giving himself a friction burn, then go ahead and curb it. Other than an intact male pursuing a bitch in heat, we can teach our feisty friends to control their natural impulses, but we ought to do so using only non-violent methods.

What to Do About Your Humping Dog

Humping: Sex, Dominance or Fun?

humping

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Old 11-20-2012, 05:27 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Mikey, being concerned about seeing a friend's dog hump himself into exhaustion says more about me than the dog? You missed the mark there.
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Old 11-20-2012, 05:50 PM   #6 (permalink)
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what is wrong with the dog humping itself into exhaustion? Why is it any different from say running it self to exhaustion chasing a lazer light, or tennis ball?
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Old 11-20-2012, 07:08 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Because the dog isn't enjoying it - it's clear he is in a high state of anxiety, and his owner can't distract him or stop the behavior. He's instantly locked into the behavior, but when he's playing, he will stop and rest. It's distressing to see. The owner is concerned, too, and I thought I could get some ideas from posting about the problem here.
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Old 11-20-2012, 08:26 PM   #8 (permalink)
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I really don't have anything helpful to contribute.

However, Jake "tries" to hump Ellie. First, he is completely at the wrong end and has no idea what he is supposed to do (he's neutered, but he is still willing to give it a shot... I think it is a universal "GUY" thing... sorry guys!) Second, I discourage it, since she is still so much smaller and its his "sister" EWWW.
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:14 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Quote:
it's clear he is in a high state of anxiety


anxiety it it cause simply the humping is the result of the anxiety and a means to relieve it. The problem is not the humping but the dog have no play skills the simple solution is to not put the dog in situtation that cause that level of anxiety.
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:22 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
his owner can't distract him or stop the behavior


of course not if he is stressed She need to put a leash on him and move him into a less stressful environment.
The Hyper over stimulated dog
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The limbic side is your emotional self.
The cognitive side is your thinking self.
Emotional reactions originate in the limbic part of the brain, which allows for fast-acting response to events based on quick impressions. Survival depends on quickness of response — allowing you to notice and duck when you catch a glimpse of a fast-moving object about to fall on your head.
Limbic over-rides cognitive. When an animal is in a state of adrenalin arousal from fear, defense, excitement or just plain sensory overload, he not only doesn't listen, he can't hear you. It does no good to repeat "sit sit sit" to a dog who is on emotional overload. He isn't thinking, he is simply reacting to the stimuli around him. He must tune-in and re-connect with you before he will be able to hear what you have to say. You must be able to get his attention first, before you tell him what you would like him to do.
"As a rule of thumb, the more excited and emotional a dog becomes, the less capable they are of thinking clearly and acting appropriately. (This is also true of all other animals, including people.) Wise handlers know that when emotions are running high, a cool down period is a good choice to avoid problems." - Suzanne Clothier
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