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Old 11-28-2011, 03:46 PM   #21 (permalink)
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Anabelle hates kids as you can see below
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Old 11-28-2011, 03:58 PM   #22 (permalink)
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I'm not sure about Dunbar, but my training philosphy says that you use the leash as little as possible, whether it's attached or not, it's just a safety device. You don't want to have to rely on the leash to get the dog to do what you want.

Most bassets are highly food motivated, but since they are also chase motivated you would need something pretty high value in an environment where there are chase objects, and even that may not work - it would depend on the basset.

The basset can learn VERY quickly using treats and marker training, but whether he actually feels like doing what you ask is another matter.....
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Old 11-28-2011, 05:32 PM   #23 (permalink)
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I have 4 and can't imagine life without them! We have a fenced yard with a doggy door... mine all were housebroken by 6-9 months olds... but they had an older basset to help teach them manners. I have one that is overly timid and would hide from a child... but the others love to meet new people and be petted. They all love daily walks... or better a car ride to McDonalds followed by a trip to the park. A slow amble is fine... just don't let a rabbit cross their path or it quickly becomes a jog. You must have a sense of humor though...
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Old 11-28-2011, 06:49 PM   #24 (permalink)
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So do they usually respond pretty well to positive rewards training that involves treats? I'm wondering if the treat will need to be really high value while out on the actual walk in order to train attention when their nose picks up everything?
this is a mistake that most novice trainer make in order to train a behavior you need to control the distraction. So you start by training in a low distraction environment and slowly increase the distraction level when the dog becomes proficient. you don;t expect a dog that can loose lead walk in the living room to suddenly beable to do so out side when a squirel runs across its path.

A hierarchy of rewards does exist and dependign on how far the task you want the dog to perform is away from the dogs desire is going to effect the choices a dog makes. On a warm sunny day the dog is going to have to have an expectation of recieving something really good if you are going to get it to lie down on asphalt however the expectaion of a high value reward is not so need to get it to lie down on gool grass or dirt. keep in mind what is important is not what the reward actrual is but the dogs expectation. If the dog only got a treat it mardinally carred about it is going to asumme that is what the reward is and act accordingly. So if the dog only got high value reward it will often perform even though the next reward is a low value one if the value for subsequent behaviors is low as well the dogs expectation will change as well.
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Old 11-28-2011, 06:52 PM   #25 (permalink)
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Anabelle hates kids as you can see below
If that were Mariah the girl was toughing I suspect she would be missing a few fingers, Hence my caveat about relying onbreed predilaction alone and what is more important is the temperament and beaviors of the individual dog.
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Old 11-28-2011, 06:57 PM   #26 (permalink)
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If I remember right, doesn't he do off-leash training so that they learn to walk with you and then when the leash goes on they've already been trained to stay with you. Obviously, with a basset this would be done in the confines of my fenced in backyard and our basset will be on a leash while on the actual walk.
there is much written about how a basset will wonder of following its nose which is true to a limited extent I have many a dog I would never trust off leash But not one of those was a basset. Off course individual situation dictate what is prudent and what is not in general basset if people are around do not wander very far If you go to a field trial you will see they are alway checking back in. Even if you don't see then for a while and you move they move with you and show up at the new spot beagle for instance are not that way I am not say you can take an untrained dog and walk around without a lead and nothing bad will happen but at the same time they are a lot better than a lot of breeds off lead contrary to popular opinion,
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Old 11-28-2011, 07:07 PM   #27 (permalink)
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Personally,I would not have a rescue in my home with children younger than teens.You may think you have decided on the friendliest basset alive then one day a child does something to trip a trigger and you have a bitting basset.Rescue dogs can be chancy at best.I'm not against rescue dogs at all, but if the background is unknown no matter how the dog acts it could be a loaded gun. Even with a puppy bought from a reliable breeder I would take the time to deal with the puppy as a puppy doing puppy things in my home seperated from very small children (when you have them all day) taking the puppy out to meet people and children so it is not over whelming for the puppy. No matter how you do it remember the dog may need a break from pestering children. I'm just being honest.
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Old 11-29-2011, 03:02 AM   #28 (permalink)
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Good to know about attaching a basset to myself. I was kind of thinking that might be the case - you've confirmed it. I'd rather not overwhelm myself while taking kiddos on walk!
Hi Swimmy Duck,

Yeah what i was trying to convey earlier is that i got overwhelmed walking a 35lb basset (most are in range of 45-65lb) and a stationery laundry cart. of course it's just us, but something to keep in mind. if it was Worm, no way could i walk kiddos + basset. frankly, it was pretty tiring walking him on a 5K walk couple months ago w/mostly people & very few dogs because of all the pulling. and all i was responsible for was me and him! plus i have to pay attention to what he's doing (ie. eating sticks, chewing kitty roca, trying to eat things he shouldn't...) i find i have to monitor him quite closely on walks.

i'd also think about what Bubbad says, she has good sense... just for your sake, since u r responsible for kids, and other people's kids at that. ie. liability issues and parents' reactions were something to accidentally happen.

also i am positive my 35lb basset could knock over a toddler, and even a 5-6 year old. these are just some things to consider...
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Old 11-29-2011, 08:40 AM   #29 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by bubbad View Post
Personally,I would not have a rescue in my home with children younger than teens.You may think you have decided on the friendliest basset alive then one day a child does something to trip a trigger and you have a bitting basset.Rescue dogs can be chancy at best.I'm not against rescue dogs at all, but if the background is unknown no matter how the dog acts it could be a loaded gun. Even with a puppy bought from a reliable breeder I would take the time to deal with the puppy as a puppy doing puppy things in my home seperated from very small children (when you have them all day) taking the puppy out to meet people and children so it is not over whelming for the puppy. No matter how you do it remember the dog may need a break from pestering children. I'm just being honest.
The reason we're considering rescue is that we've gone the puppy route with our Corgi. He ended up being a complete mismatch with our family temperament wise. I worked and worked and worked and worked with him. In the end he became pretty well-trained, but he started becoming aggressive. It was hard work to raise a puppy with the daycare, start from scratch with socialization, crate training, house training, etc...only to end up with a dog who seemed miserable and starting biting (in a snarly sort of way, not in a nippy way). We tried several things and his behavior got worse, not better. It broke my heart to return him to the breeder. We've learned a lot since then and there are things we will never know for sure, but we do question whether this dog was bred properly and/or socialized at all prior to coming to us. So after talking it over with several others we decided to go with an adult dog with a known temperament - a lot of them we're looking at are between 4-5 years old. I do understand what you're saying about not knowing with a rescue, but I thought I would know by raising a dog from a puppy and that didn't end the way I thought it would. I like the fact that in the rescue we're looking at the dogs are living in foster homes and I feel like that gives us a more solid idea of disposition than a dog who's sitting in a kennel. Also, I'm hoping to find a rescue who's being fostered by a home with young children. I'm hoping those things will set me up for success.

But I do get what you're saying. I have seen a few rescue dogs with known histories - things such as basset had good family but owner became too sick, too old, etc...So it'd be nice if we could find that sort of history - I think that would help to set us up for success. I've e-mailed some IL contacts through the BHCA to see if I can get any leads on an adult basset. It'd be great if I could find a breeder that has an adult dog with a great disposition that needs to be rehomed due to some other reason aside from dog behavior - such as moving, child allergies, etc...Honestly, that would be an ideal situation for us if we could find it. But we're just putting feelers out in all directions at this point to see what turns up.
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Old 11-29-2011, 10:23 AM   #30 (permalink)
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I appreciate that you are going about this in a way that should work out for everyone .I figured if you took what I said as just blowing off at you then maybe a dog in general would not make out well in your situation.It is ashame the Corgi did not work for you.Obviously something went wrong somewhere they are a herding breed and can become quite nippy as part of their genitic make up, but by and large they are a great breed .I had a Pembroke as a teen ,alot of energy,even more than a basset. That being said ,be sure to take an honest look at what you may have done wrong with him ,it could have been his breeding but you raised him,and I don't mean that to be smart or put you down,a combination of things is most likely. Adult bassets are big babies usually,boys especially,they are love muffins.Girls rule the house,that is not to say they don't want lovin,but just on their terms,there is always the exception,but a bitch will take over and can be bossy. I wish you luck and don't be afraid to look in the surrounding states,you don't have to drive from here to timbucktoo to get a good basset but expanding your area to look could be helpful,driving a couple hours to visit a breeder can be done in a weekend ,then come home without the dog and consider everything you have seen and asked about, once you have made a decision it doesn't hurt to take that drive again to pick up your dog.
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