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Old 03-04-2011, 04:38 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Aggressive Basset

Hi, I am new to forum.

I have a question that I hope someone could helkp me with.

Has anyone ever had a aggresive Basset Hound?

When Elvis doesn't want to do something that my wife and me want him to do, there's a pretty good chance that he will literally try to maul us.
I know it sounds crazy but let's say I want to put him in his cage, or he runs out and we grab him collar so he doesn't run away and then try to get him back in the house, or if he's on the bed and I try to pick him up to get him off. If he wants to come down no problem I pick him up and put him down, BUT if he doesn't it's like WWIII he attacks and not just a growl or even a snap, but lunging repeated attacks until I manhandle him off the bed or in the house.

The funny thing is is about 95% of the time he is the most lovable dog I know but I've never had a dog bite me. (My own dog)

Let me explain how we ended up with a bassetl. My ast dog was a rottie mix about 125 lbs, and while he was very protective and snapped at a couple people (and needed a tranquillizer when I brought him to the vet), BUT I could grab him collar drag him in the house, throw him in his cage, Never did he bite me.

So for our latest dog my wife and I wanted a nice mellow lovable FRIENDLY dog, and we both love the basset breed.

I realize they are stibborn and can be a real pain at times, but I can overlook all of that. But when I came home Sunday from food shopping and saw my wife's arms swollen and bleeding, I can't take more of that.
Her wrist looked broken it was so swollen, thankfully it wasn't.

So has anyone else known a basset that would snap on it's owners?

He's about 14 months he's been doing this sparatically since about 9 months.

He's fixed.

He's about 65 lbs.
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Old 03-04-2011, 04:49 PM   #2 (permalink)
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my basset is about 4 months and he tends to growl and snap if something is being done he doesnt like aka cleaning his ears....he is going to private dog obedience lessens because i feel it is my fault that he feels he is lead dog with all the spoiling I do. It sounds like your basset feels that he is the leader also. Maybe some behavior modifications will help your guy too. Woody is a sweetheart himself so I have been promised this will help..and my trainer is someone good with bassets since she owns 2 of them herself.

Good luck with him

Woody and his mom
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Old 03-04-2011, 05:17 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Thanks for the response, Yep I'm starting training this weekend. It's my last option before Elvis has to leave. (I hope it works out, I must be a horrible dog trainer because I know we babied him WAY TOO MUCH).

I was getting scared because everwhere I read it said Bassets Don't Bite... So I was thinking "great I have the only Psycho Basset out there..."

I'll keep you posted.

Any other advice is appreciated.
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Old 03-04-2011, 05:31 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Quote:
that he feels he is lead dog with all the spoiling I do. It sounds like your basset feels that he is the leader also. Maybe some behavior modifications will help your guy too.
there is no indication contrary to popular myths subscribed to and repopularized my TV personalities. that dogs seek or even care about status. Humans yest and when humans describe dogs as "status seeking" it appear to be a projection of human beliefs on a dogs interaction when in fact that are much less convoluted and straight forward reasons that have nothing to do with status seeking see


Dominance in domestic dogs—useful construct or bad habit?

Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, Vol. 4, Issue 3.

[quote]The term "dominance" is widely used in the academic and popular literature on the behavior of domestic dogs, especially in the context of aggression. Although dominance is correctly a property of relationships, it has been erroneously used to describe a supposed trait of individual dogs, even though there is little evidence that such a trait exists. When used correctly to describe a relationship between 2 individuals, it tends to be misapplied as a motivation for social interactions, rather than simply a quality of that relationship. Hence, it is commonly suggested that a desire 'to be dominant' actually drives behavior, especially aggression, in the domestic dog. By contrast, many recent studies of wolf packs have questioned whether there is any direct correspondence between dominance within a relationship and agonistic behavior, and in contrast to wolves, hierarchical social structures have little relationship with reproductive behavior in feral dog packs. Nor do the exchanges of aggressive and submissive behavior in feral dogs, originally published by S. K. Pal and coworkers, fit the pattern predicted from wolf behavior, especially the submissive behavior observed between members of different packs. In the present study of a freely interacting group of neutered male domestic dogs, pairwise relationships were evident, but no overall hierarchy could be detected. Since there seems to be little empirical basis for wolf-type dominance hierarchies in dogs[/url]

Myth 10: Dogs live in a dominance hierarchy, with the Alpha dog at the top as the absolute leader.

Quote:
The final strange thing about this myth is that no one has ever yet been able to find a real dominance hierarchy within a group of dogs, no matter how hard they looked or what kind of statistics they applied. The whole idea is utter nonsense.
y Won't Dominance Die?

Quote:
ny leading animal behaviourists are concerned that the “dominance” model of pet dog behaviour continues to survive, despite the accumulating evidence that it is at best unhelpful and at worst highly detrimental.
The problem is this type of belief changes the relationship and how you react to the dog will be more conforntational if you believe the dog can never win. A dogs natural reaction based in genetics and enviorment is to fight or flight. For those dog that back down all is fine for those that don't however you get a escallating conflict and reaction as note in the first post. I got a run but will be back later with more ideas and suggestion on improving the situation.
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Old 03-04-2011, 07:14 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Hi Ogilvy, I'm sorry about what happened to your wife's arm.
I too have problem with my basset. Carlos is 8 months old now, I adopted him 1.5 months ago. Like Elvis, he also bites hands and sometimes can be very aggressive and jumps on people. His previous owner dumped him because of this. But most of the time he's a very sweet and affectionate dog. What I've done so far is I pin him down on the floor when he's having his tantrum and say NO firmly until he gives up. This only works temporarily.
I live in Indonesia, in an area where obedience trainers are not available. So if you guys have suggestion on how to handle my dog please, please let me know.
Thanks!
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Old 03-04-2011, 08:15 PM   #6 (permalink)
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He might have resource guarding and body handling issues. A lot of bassets are sensitive and need gentle training. Try teaching him to get down off the bed instead of you forcing him off and also training him to go where he needs to be so you can eliminate the collar dragging. Collar dragging is an easy solution for us, but your basset might be seeing it as an aggressive act towards him. Even though you might not mean it to be. There is a lot of good books and info about resource guarding. Maybe he is also lacking in confidence. Doing more training with him will give him better confidence. Maybe he needs more exercise as well. Playing "brain games" is also a good way to help build confidence with him. When you look for training ideas and resource guarding info, make sure it is positive reinforcement based.
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Old 03-04-2011, 08:25 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Well as I have said before, I have yet to see an aggressive Basset... and three generations of my family have had Bassets, many older rehomes between us all and we have always had two or three together, occasionally four when we temporarily fostered or looked after friends' Bassets and never once have I seen any aggression whatsoever in any of them, not even when we have introduced a new Basset to the others.

Maybe because myself, my husband and two children are laid-back, it rubs off onto our Bassets and we have never used a cage and our hounds have several beds in the kitchen, hall and lounge and they aren't allowed on stairs as it's not good for their little front legs, especially with all that weight going downwards. I think Mikey usually has some good advice!
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Old 03-05-2011, 09:38 AM   #8 (permalink)
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There are definitely aggressive,biting bassets,as any dog can be given the right situations.Sometimes without realizing it we contribute to the problem.We don't deal with it when it first starts usually when they become "teenagers" and or starting to become sexually mature,or when they are puppies and we think growling is cute. Occasionally, genitics can be responsible for the temperment of a dog. It isn't something that goes away it just gets worse.Then when it progresses to the Monster stage and people are now getting bitten it is the dog that has to pay the price. Pardon me and I don't mean this to be smart but the Rotti should not have had to tranquilized to be taken to the vet and never "thrown" in his crate. You may not have actually ment thrown but it sounded like roughness anyway. What happened to the Rotti,just curious. Dogs are not people as much as we love them and care about them and for them, they need disipline, and I don't mean harsh.They need to know what is expected of them which is now what you are doing by going to training. The training is for you more than the dog. Think like a dog ,the more you spoil them and don't require them to respond to a command like"NO" you increase the problems they will give you. Just like kids in that manner, let them get away with enough disrespect and you'll be trying to fix what you contributed to.I get a lot out of watching Ceasar Milan,he thinks like a dog ,he teaches them in a way they understand. Anyway,I digress, I know Mikey will not agree with what I'm saying and that is ok . I know I'm not directly answering your problem, but, there are mean ,nasty ,aggressive, bassets out there and I'm afraid we are making alot of them what they are. Maybe I am just seeing this in a bad light,so I 'm sorry for coming on so strong.
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Old 03-05-2011, 11:13 AM   #9 (permalink)
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If it were my dog I'd give him a reality check. Perhaps try crate training him and not giving him the luxury of sleeping where ever he wants. What he is doing is working for him so in dog world, he's just going to keep doing it. He knows if he doesn't want to, he can escalate his behavior until eventually you leave him alone.

Have you tried to bribe him with treats when you want him to move rather than dragging him? He's probably very food motivated and would gladly relocate for a treat. Plus you won't end up with a bite. When he does what you want the rest of the time are you making a nice big deal out of it? Don't forget to reward good behavior and not just notice the bad behavior.

It is hard not to baby your pup and I've been guilty of the same thing. I actually had a lab bite my daughter because he learned he could do whatever he wanted and would snap if displeased. So, try a strict routine with crate, positive bribes, and reinforcement for awhile. Lord knows it might take a basset quite a while, even with perfect consistancy, to accept the new routine.

BTW I'm a new basset owner so this is me guessing at a solution for you. Not a seasoned pro here by any stretch but hoping to try and help.

Good luck!
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Old 03-05-2011, 11:16 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Oh and another thought. Where did you get him? Any possibility that he had a rough start to life or even possibly some inbreeding? I hear that accidental inbreeding shows up first with abnormal aggressive behavior.
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