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Old 05-05-2016, 08:45 AM   #11 (permalink)
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"Agree, but also don't think the vast majority of owners are concerned enough to take an interest in their dogs 'body language'."

Why Supervising Dogs and Kids Doesn’t Work | Robin Bennett
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In fact, I’ve consulted on hundreds of dog bite cases and 95% of the time the parent was standing within 3 feet of the child watching both child and dog when the child was bitten. Parents are supervising. The problem is not lack of supervision. The problem is no one has taught parents what they should be watching.
"There was a study a while back that said you should never let a dog look into your eyes as that gave them dominance.....I don't believe that either, I think communication is about eyes."

it is dangerous to extrapolate form dog v dog communication to dog v human, Dogs clearly know the difference between dogs and humans and communicate differently between the two . That said direct prolonged eye contact is an aggressive behavior in dog v dog and can be in dog v human and can be interpreted by the dog as an aggressive act by some dog if they get it from a human.

https://www.facebook.com/TheZakGeorg...28316293880719
" I think that very often, people misinterpret eye contact with a dog as being confrontational. And don't get me wrong, eye contact can be used to intimidate a dog if that is the motivation behind it. If one is trying to assert "dominance" and is confrontational during training, then a dog may react badly. Understandably so! If a strange man came up to you on the street and stared you down, you might become defensive. BUT when your first grade teacher encourages you to look at them so that they might teach you, you are not threatened by this eye contact. Eye contact, in and of itself , though, does not promote aggression for the overwhelming majority of dogs. This is a massive myth in dog training today and a classic example of how correlation is not always causality .
However, of course one should never go "eye to eye" with a dog they do not know or have a great relationship with as certain dogs can be thrown off by this (duh!). Anyone who has ever met a happy dog at a friend's house for the first time will tell you that that dog probably naturally looked at them in the eyes. The dog's ancestor, the wolf, does NOT naturally seek eye contact with people in the way that dogs do. Dogs have been bred for thousands of years to interact with people in one capacity or another. It is time to quit pretending that dogs are wild wolves! Over time, dogs collectively, have learned to seek eye contact with people as this is one of the easiest ways to understand people and dogs alike."
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Old 05-05-2016, 08:50 AM   #12 (permalink)
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"Agree, but also don't think the vast majority of owners are concerned enough to take an interest in their dogs 'body language'."

Why Supervising Dogs and Kids Doesnít Work | Robin Bennett
Quote:
In fact, Iíve consulted on hundreds of dog bite cases and 95% of the time the parent was standing within 3 feet of the child watching both child and dog when the child was bitten. Parents are supervising. The problem is not lack of supervision. The problem is no one has taught parents what they should be watching.
"There was a study a while back that said you should never let a dog look into your eyes as that gave them dominance.....I don't believe that either, I think communication is about eyes."

it is dangerous to extrapolate form dog v dog communication to dog v human, Dogs clearly know the difference between dogs and humans and communicate differently between the two . That said direct prolonged eye contact is an aggressive behavior in dog v dog and can be in dog v human and can be interpreted by the dog as an aggressive act by some dog if they get it from a human.

https://www.facebook.com/TheZakGeorg...28316293880719
" I think that very often, people misinterpret eye contact with a dog as being confrontational. And don't get me wrong, eye contact can be used to intimidate a dog if that is the motivation behind it. If one is trying to assert "dominance" and is confrontational during training, then a dog may react badly. Understandably so! If a strange man came up to you on the street and stared you down, you might become defensive. BUT when your first grade teacher encourages you to look at them so that they might teach you, you are not threatened by this eye contact. Eye contact, in and of itself , though, does not promote aggression for the overwhelming majority of dogs. This is a massive myth in dog training today and a classic example of how correlation is not always causality .
However, of course one should never go "eye to eye" with a dog they do not know or have a great relationship with as certain dogs can be thrown off by this (duh!). Anyone who has ever met a happy dog at a friend's house for the first time will tell you that that dog probably naturally looked at them in the eyes. The dog's ancestor, the wolf, does NOT naturally seek eye contact with people in the way that dogs do. Dogs have been bred for thousands of years to interact with people in one capacity or another. It is time to quit pretending that dogs are wild wolves! Over time, dogs collectively, have learned to seek eye contact with people as this is one of the easiest ways to understand people and dogs alike."
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Old 05-05-2016, 09:03 AM   #13 (permalink)
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looks like the Study was Done by Stanley Coren of Dog intelligence infamy here is a link https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog...nt-hug-the-dog
"I suppose that one aspect of the data that struck me as interesting comes from the fact that the photographs that I used were obviously posts by individuals who wanted to show how much they cared for and shared a bond with their pet. This means that the people who were doing the Internet posting probably chose photos in which they felt that both the person and the dog looked happiest. Nonetheless, around 82% of the photographs show unhappy dogs receiving hugs from their owners or children. This seems consistent with other research which suggests that people, especially children, seem to have difficulty reading signs of stress and anxiety based upon their dogs' facial expressions. (Click here for more about that.) Much more relevant for the current question is the fact that this data clearly shows that while a few dogs may like being hugged, more than four out of five dogs find this human expression of affection to be unpleasant and/or anxiety arousing."

While not explained in the article I thing there is a clear distinct between a hug and other forms of close physical contact i.e. Snuggling, I a hug is wrapping the arms about and around the shoulder or neck area of the dog an is the primary point of contact. It is well know for many dog experiencing anxiety squeezing the entire body and close close body contact can relieve some stress which is how ttouch wrap and thundershirts work. they real are not hugs.
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Old 05-06-2016, 09:38 AM   #14 (permalink)
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Agree, most people do not take the time to learn dog body language, or the subtle voice communications. Personally, I speak dog. I can even tell when Ester has "found" something in the other room she shouldn't have by the proud patter of her trot. Being tuned in to your dogs makes all the difference. As children do NOT have this capability, it very important to teach them to be careful around dogs, especially ones they do not know. I am appalled at people who let their kids run up to our dogs. The dogs behave fine, the kids do NOT.

BTW fossil finds in Asia and genomic studies are now suggesting that dogs and wolves share a common ancestor, dogs are no longer believed to have been descended from wolves....interesting.

Last edited by PollyEster; 05-06-2016 at 09:41 AM.
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