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Old 12-18-2011, 08:51 PM   #11 (permalink)
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In this particular case, though, we KNOW that there will be a problem with the boxer. I would make sure the boxer never has a chance to harass Oscar in the first place.
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Old 12-21-2011, 07:44 PM   #12 (permalink)
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It's funny. Following being asked to keep better tabs on her dog or leave, it had come to light she had previously been asked to leave another city-run park because of her dog. In that case, I guess a much larger Rottweiler took exception to its behavior and I guess it wasn't pretty. Much like Oscar, he was a happy-go-lucky dog, playing well with all dogs of all sizes. She was asked to leave.

I couldn't agree more. As much as it's the other owner's responsibility, if an incident is bound to happen, I need to nip it in the bud before it even occurs. The safety of my own dog is paramount, regardless of whether it's fair or not.

Thank you all for your help and support! I can;t tell you how much I appreciate it!

Shawn
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Old 12-12-2012, 09:30 AM   #13 (permalink)
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Mine does the same! I have a 3 yr male and one puppy, who is developing the very same behaviour now that he is growing up (they are father and son). I am also very embarassed when this happens. He has never been agressive to me, though. Even when I grab him hard saying bed dog! He is respectful to me, but to other dogs (bigger / male) he can be agressive!
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Old 12-12-2012, 12:00 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Don't also forget that young male dogs - teenagers - are full of hormones (if entire) & other dogs will react to this.
I'm afraid that since having one of ours attacked & paralysed, most of the time (I can't say all) I'm the one that chooses who my dogs play with should they want to, not some dog that charges in.
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Old 12-12-2012, 05:02 PM   #15 (permalink)
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I was at the dog park recently (before I had my pup - just checking it out) and there was one really cute dog - kind of mid sized, looked part shepherd, that all the other dogs decided was low man or something. The dogs were all playing nicely till one decided to hump this dog, then like 15 followed suit and had it cornered. The owners never did intervene. I just decided on only scheduled playdates with dogs I know. It's like taking my kids to the park, sometimes you just can't control the situation enough, and I almost think it's worse with dogs because it's harder to tell a strange dog to back down than a child whose parent isn't intervening.
I hope you find some good ways for Oscar to socialize - he sounds like a great dog!
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Old 12-12-2012, 07:06 PM   #16 (permalink)
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Next step: convincing him to sleep in his own bed for the WHOLE night. Anyone have an explanation as to why they seem to always have to have their butts up against you in bed or on the couch? And why do they sleep horizontally across the bed, and not vertically like us?!

Happy Holidays!!![/QUOTE]


I know the first answer: they like warm bums and who doesn't!

Can't help with the second - the horizontal thing drives us crazy too
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Old 12-13-2012, 08:00 AM   #17 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawnAnd View Post
It's funny. Following being asked to keep better tabs on her dog or leave, it had come to light she had previously been asked to leave another city-run park because of her dog. In that case, I guess a much larger Rottweiler took exception to its behavior and I guess it wasn't pretty. Much like Oscar, he was a happy-go-lucky dog, playing well with all dogs of all sizes. She was asked to leave.

I couldn't agree more. As much as it's the other owner's responsibility, if an incident is bound to happen, I need to nip it in the bud before it even occurs. The safety of my own dog is paramount, regardless of whether it's fair or not.

Thank you all for your help and support! I can;t tell you how much I appreciate it!

Shawn
This is funny :P You sound like you're being very responsible about the whole thing and Oscar is lucky to have you!


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Old 12-13-2012, 08:21 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Reading all this and all the theories put forward brings me to one thought only - your boy was castrated when he was 8+ months right? The other dogs are entire right? So, inbuilt into your boy is the fact that he knows he's at a disadvantage, as a neutered dog. As is often the case with neutered males, that the other entire dogs may well zero in on him. So he's getting his licks in first - 'attack always the best form of defence'. He feels vulnerable. I had something similar with my last home-bred Basset when he'd lost his sister and the others of his support group. He was entire, but was faced with having to deal with everything out there by himself with no back-up. In truth, he'd always stood back and let the girls sort out anything remotely 'dangerous'. He started putting his hackles up when he as much as saw another dog, bitch or male, approaching. It was very embarrassing!! Once we bought him a new friend he settled down again and went back to enjoying his walks.

I'd offer that you should, without babying him exactly, reinforce his confidence when it comes to approaching other unknown dogs. Keep him on his lead and perhaps find somewhere quieter to exercise him where he's not put in this kind of situation. But then I don't do places where loads of other dogs congregate. I much prefer to get out across the fields with mine.

And incidentally I hate it when Bassets are castrated at under a year because they do, from experience, so often remain silly puppies. This is not a breed that, medical reasons apart, really need to be castrated. Imvho.
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Old 12-13-2012, 11:54 AM   #19 (permalink)
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Quote:
This is not a breed that, medical reasons apart, really need to be castrated. Imvho.
when looking at the studies done there is more medical issue associated with nuetering than leaving intacts and a side for male male aggression more behavioral issue associated with castration than leaving intact. regardess of the breed. Nuetering is not routinely done in other countries other than the US.
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Old 12-13-2012, 04:47 PM   #20 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FranksMum View Post
Reading all this and all the theories put forward brings me to one thought only - your boy was castrated when he was 8+ months right? The other dogs are entire right? So, inbuilt into your boy is the fact that he knows he's at a disadvantage, as a neutered dog. As is often the case with neutered males, that the other entire dogs may well zero in on him. So he's getting his licks in first - 'attack always the best form of defence'. He feels vulnerable. I had something similar with my last home-bred Basset when he'd lost his sister and the others of his support group. He was entire, but was faced with having to deal with everything out there by himself with no back-up. In truth, he'd always stood back and let the girls sort out anything remotely 'dangerous'. He started putting his hackles up when he as much as saw another dog, bitch or male, approaching. It was very embarrassing!! Once we bought him a new friend he settled down again and went back to enjoying his walks.

I'd offer that you should, without babying him exactly, reinforce his confidence when it comes to approaching other unknown dogs. Keep him on his lead and perhaps find somewhere quieter to exercise him where he's not put in this kind of situation. But then I don't do places where loads of other dogs congregate. I much prefer to get out across the fields with mine.

And incidentally I hate it when Bassets are castrated at under a year because they do, from experience, so often remain silly puppies. This is not a breed that, medical reasons apart, really need to be castrated. Imvho.
Franksmum, could not have put it better.

Have a boy who came to us at ten months very insecure, badgered by vet & breeder to neuter. the worst thing I ever did to him & there's not a day I don't regret it. He used to play well with other dogs but within six months all they wanted to do was hump him, dogs would & still do, charge him. Now he has a few friends that he plays with who leave him alone otherwise find myself steering well clear of unknown dogs, but like you tend to take off for long walks where we don't meet many & if I don't know them slip him on lead & he walks at heel. Why we castrate dogs so young in this country sadness me & I would never never neuter another dog unless for medical reasons. Take a pup to the vet & as soon as it's finished it's vaccinations vets start to pester about when the poor dog's is going to be neutered, cynical I may be but it also is a nice little earner.
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